Conversation Between monk_keys and victoryshinesonus

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My messages
  1. victoryshinesonus
    30-03-2012
  2. monk_keys
    30-03-2012
    Yes to everything.

    From the looks of your module options there are some really good ones in there that I would obviously recommend you take (banking and finance, business economics, keep it practical). Big firms especially will look at your individual units and the corresponding grades as something to gauge you on, more so because of your major in history (it was mine too).
  3. victoryshinesonus
    30-03-2012
    Hi, you were right, I've found 12 top 30 firms which don't look at or just want a C in Maths + English GCSE. What I found interesting was a fair few Oxford grads in their graduate profiles they also tended to come from more traditional unis, although one firms seemed to just pick business/accounting/AF grads, and they seemed to not care about the uni you attended, but most of the profiles I saw were not like that
  4. victoryshinesonus
    30-03-2012
    Hiya, this is the course: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/undergra...ode=00340&pg=1

    It's not quite 50:50 but certainly each year you can take at least 2 economics modules.

    Most things would be open to me, as long as I take Introductory Mathematics and Introductory Statistics. It's aimed at people who have only got GCSE Maths, so that should be good, though, once A-levels are over, I will be starting to learn differentiation and the other stuff. Already got some books which some fella recommended on here, they take you step by step which is good

    The number after 'ECON' indicates what year I enter for it. http://www.socialsciences.manchester...l?department=3

    I'm sort of leaning towards Accountancy now, but haven't really spoken to friends/family because it's a bit early. But from what I've seen, it requires you to remember a lot of information etc. and I'm quite interested in that sort of thing having done essay subjects at A-level. But I was worried about my C, I'm happy to re-take it, especially as I'm doing some Economics at uni, most of the tough stuff from higher tier is BOUND to be covered, however, I've seen many firms say 'exams taken at the same time', which has just made me think...if I do retake and enter the new grade, they may discard my app because they'll assume I got a D first time round of something, whereas a C doesn't shout 'crap' at Maths. Hard choice. I'm sort of motivated by the money as well, I'm not gonna lie, but the hours are great as well! It seems like it's relatively stress free upon qualifying, which is also a bonus, that's why I was interested in salaries I will google it now Thnx
  5. monk_keys
    30-03-2012
    An important point to remember is that information on the internet is skewed towards the big 4 because they are harder to get into and so candidates require more information, that's why here are wikijobs only talk about them.

    It would definitely be worth writing an email that honestly states your position and you interest in accountancy and simply ask the question about your C grade, just copy and paste it and send it off to a range of firms. As mentioned already there are many other things you can do over the next three years to increase your employability so stay focused. It's a real advantage to start thinking about it now. Universities have great careers advice for free, not to mention careers fairs where PwC will most likely have a stall at your uni. I think you said you're doing combined honours with economics? I would say you can't afford to mess up any of those units, you just can't afford to for a larger firm.

    I'm really not in a position to say with regards to salaries at small firms. The thing to focus on is not what you'll be earning by the end of the scheme, but what you'll be earn in your first job out of the scheme. This is the type of thing that can quite easily be googled 'newly qualified ACA' or something. Remember you will earn less outside of London (thought there are small firms in London) and once qualified you will earn more or less depending on your sector of industry. So I have a friend who is at a small regional firm specialising in agriculture, however he also gets to work directly with the Partner.
  6. victoryshinesonus
    30-03-2012
    Just wanted to say thanks so much for those links! I thought the only ways into accountancy were through the big 4, I think that people who want to pursue accountancy rather than just a big 4 job will apply to the smaller firms. From what I've seen they don't have GCSE requirements; the smaller ones anyway. RSM Tenon didn't state if they had any. Do you think it's still possible to enter the sector and earn a good deal of money with a C in Maths. I must stress it DOES NOT represent my true mathematical ability. If I went to a small firm, how much would I be earning by the end of the scheme, say by age of 24?
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