Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey there Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Newcastle University, Course transfer to Medicine

Announcements Posted on
Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
    • Thread Starter
    • 11 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Hi,

    I am interested in studying Medicine, however I also have an urging back bone to learn about pharmacology too.

    Newcastle University has a Pharmacology course that states after Stage one 'You may also apply to transfer to our degree in Medicine or Dentistry (places are available on a competitive basis).'

    So would it be worth me applying for Pharmacology, with the hope of transferring to Medicine after my first year, or just applying for Medicine first?

    (Either way I will obviously be making sure I have the correct grades, etc for Medicine)
    Thanks.
    • 4 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    So you only want to do this because you want to do some Pharmocology? That's ridiculous.

    Make up your mind which degree you want to do and apply for it.
    • Thread Starter
    • 11 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Elwyn)
    So you only want to do this because you want to do some Pharmocology? That's ridiculous.

    Make up your mind which degree you want to do and apply for it.
    I want to do this because I am interested in Pharmacology too, I think it would be a fascinating career. My overall passion is to be a Doctor, but why should I disregard all other interests, I'm not a robot programmed to follow one path, are you?
    Leeds University offer an intercalated degree where I can do medicinal pharmacology as well as my medical degree. So I can do both if I bloody well want too.
    Have you never been indecisive? How can I disregard one when I'm interested in both? More to the point, who are you to say I can't indulge in both? When it's obvious that I can, given that some Universities allow intercalation.

    Telling someone they can't explore their interests, and that they have to stick to one thing is bad advice.
    I'll leave my overall judgement of your reply in Zoidbergs hands... Well, claws. -

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Zoidy.jpg 
Views:	57 
Size:	41.8 KB 
ID:	134186
    Attached Thumbnails
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	xMiGl.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	41.8 KB 
ID:	134187  
    • Thread Starter
    • 11 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Elwyn)
    So you only want to do this because you want to do some Pharmocology? That's ridiculous.

    Make up your mind which degree you want to do and apply for it.
    Wait... You have bad advice AND you're a hypocrite.

    'Hi, I am a year 12 student, studying Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics. For years ive had my heart set on doing medicine, and beleived I could get the grades needed. However, after doing the C1 maths exam yesterday, im seriously worrying weather I can achieve AAAb (b in maths). Any ideas for similar courses, which incorporate science and medicine such as Biomedical Science will be greatly appreciated thanks.'

    Sound familiar?

    You were in a similar situation at my age, except you worried about getting the grades. Whereas I worry about not choosing the right one. You were indecisive and looking for other options too at my age, yet you have the indecency to tell me that I'm being ridiculous?

    Look, you got where you wanted to be, and I'm happy for you, you stuck in and got what you wanted. Good for you.
    I realise that my original post may of seemed greedy, but all I'm really looking for is some friendly advice because I can't choose, this is what I will be doing for the rest of my life.
    Instead of being a hypocrite and lending an unhelpful, rude answer. Try helping for once.
    And you want to be a Doctor? If you can't offer support for one person in need, you've got a lot of changing to do. It's all well and good getting the grades, writing a kick ass PS, doing some voluntary work experience and doing well in the interview. But you have no chance if you don't actually want to help people, despite how 'ridiculous' you might think they are.

    Because of your approach to this, I know for a fact I wouldn't want you as my Doctor if I needed some support.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Simmer down.

    I don't think two lines warranted such a hissy fit. If you want to be a medic or a pharmacist you're going to have to deal with patients and other health professionals who disagree with you.

    And he's right, it's a little bit ridiculous, although you may not know why. Apply for the course you could see yourself working through to the end. You should not apply to pharmacy with the intention of transferring after first year unless you have no other option, which you do. Numbers for transfers will be low and you'll have to be at the top of your year.
    Unless you want to be a pharmacist . (<----full stop)

    You'll be depriving a place of someone who does want to see it through as well.

    Finally, you do do pharmacology when reading Medicine, so . . . .
    • 5 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Tbh you will do some pharmacology in a medicine degree... if they weren't simmilar enough they wouldn't allow you to transfer. It isn't worht applying to pharmacology because it might be an 'easy' path into medicine... Lancaster has a simmilar scheme and it requires students to get 80-85% in thier first year, which is definitely difficult at universitiy level. Pick the degree you want to do.... yes, if you are not sure the pharmacology with the possibility of transferring into medicine may be a good route, but ultimately you would still restrict your options to a degree because transferring is unlikely to be a simple, straightforward process.
    • 37 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    If you really want to learn about pharmacology, you would get more out of doing medicine and intercalating in it than you would out of doing the first year and then transferring out. The first year course will be basic science on a similar kind of level to the medicine course, rather than the more advanced research-based pharm stuff you would do in an intercalated degree (which would generally be equivalent to doing a 3rd year pharm course). Intercalating would also give you an extra degree, whereas doing a first year and transferring out won't give you anything for your CV/FPAS application. If you're really into pharmacology then do the whole degree and think about grad medicine, but this is much harder to get into. IMO, the best option for combining the two would be to do medicine and intercalate in pharmacology. I did this, though for different reasons.

    Also, just to clarify for some other people in the thread, a degree in pharmacology does not make you a pharmacist - it's a different subject from pharmacy.
    • 4 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lsaul95)
    X
    No matter how 'rude' you think my answer to be, it's true.
    The type of course you described in the OP is NOT the same as an intercalated degree or graduate entry route. The route you suggested is for a very small number of people to transfer to medicine after a year, with no credit from their pharmacology degree and only basic science knowledge medicine covers anyway.
    Also, you'd be lucky if you could transfer, it's far harder to get into medicine that way than the normal undergrad route.
    • Thread Starter
    • 11 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Blorcyn)
    Simmer down.

    I don't think two lines warranted such a hissy fit. If you want to be a medic or a pharmacist you're going to have to deal with patients and other health professionals who disagree with you.

    And he's right, it's a little bit ridiculous, although you may not know why. Apply for the course you could see yourself working through to the end. You should not apply to pharmacy with the intention of transferring after first year unless you have no other option, which you do. Numbers for transfers will be low and you'll have to be at the top of your year.
    Unless you want to be a pharmacist . (<----full stop)

    You'll be depriving a place of someone who does want to see it through as well.

    Finally, you do do pharmacology when reading Medicine, so . . . .
    Fair one, thanks for your insight. Pharmacy is different from Pharmacology by the way. Pharmacology doesn't make you a pharmacist.


    (Original post by bownessie)
    Tbh you will do some pharmacology in a medicine degree... if they weren't simmilar enough they wouldn't allow you to transfer. It isn't worht applying to pharmacology because it might be an 'easy' path into medicine... Lancaster has a simmilar scheme and it requires students to get 80-85% in thier first year, which is definitely difficult at universitiy level. Pick the degree you want to do.... yes, if you are not sure the pharmacology with the possibility of transferring into medicine may be a good route, but ultimately you would still restrict your options to a degree because transferring is unlikely to be a simple, straightforward process.
    Thanks for your reply. Yeah, I didn't suspect that it would be easier, I know that it would be a lot more complicated than just applying for medicine straight off. Which shows that I really am clueless when it comes to choosing the right approach, hence why I asked for advice. Thanks again though, I'm going for medicine, I will look up courses which have some pharmacology in a module. If not, then it's not the end of the world, but I'd like the option to study an interest to a certain degree.

    (Original post by Helenia)
    If you really want to learn about pharmacology, you would get more out of doing medicine and intercalating in it than you would out of doing the first year and then transferring out. The first year course will be basic science on a similar kind of level to the medicine course, rather than the more advanced research-based pharm stuff you would do in an intercalated degree (which would generally be equivalent to doing a 3rd year pharm course). Intercalating would also give you an extra degree, whereas doing a first year and transferring out won't give you anything for your CV/FPAS application. If you're really into pharmacology then do the whole degree and think about grad medicine, but this is much harder to get into. IMO, the best option for combining the two would be to do medicine and intercalate in pharmacology. I did this, though for different reasons.

    Also, just to clarify for some other people in the thread, a degree in pharmacology does not make you a pharmacist - it's a different subject from pharmacy.
    Okay, yeah I realised after posting that the first year was just basic science, apparently the modules studied in first year are similar to most science degrees in Newcastle University, as a background knowledge sort of thing. I'm definitely going to apply for Medicine, I'd just like the option to learn more about an interest I have. If I get to the point where I can be offered intercalation for pharmacology, and I still want to learn more, then I will take up the complications at that time.
    Thank you for your reply, it was really helpful.


    (Original post by Elwyn)
    No matter how 'rude' you think my answer to be, it's true.
    The type of course you described in the OP is NOT the same as an intercalated degree or graduate entry route. The route you suggested is for a very small number of people to transfer to medicine after a year, with no credit from their pharmacology degree and only basic science knowledge medicine covers anyway.
    Also, you'd be lucky if you could transfer, it's far harder to get into medicine that way than the normal undergrad route.
    I know it's not the same, that's why I asked for advice about it. Yes, I understand that the route I suggested in OP was far more complicated than an intercalation. But I understand that now because people have told me about it and gave me advice about it instead of just stating that it was ridiculous.
    Additionally, I may of taken it a little too far with my reply earlier
    I'm not one to hold a grudge, your answer may not of benefited me in any way, however it was your opinion, so I apologise.
    I work hard because I've always been told 'you can't do that', 'you're not clever enough', I like to believe I can, so I'll never take it lightly when someone suggests that I can't do something. My bad. :^_^:
    • 1 follower
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lsaul95)
    Leeds University offer an intercalated degree where I can do medicinal pharmacology as well as my medical degree.
    You can do this at many medical schools, you won't need to go to Leeds.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    A far more sensible thing would be to apply for medicine at Newcastle, then intercalate in Pharmacology...
    • 8 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lsaul95)
    Hi,

    I am interested in studying Medicine, however I also have an urging back bone to learn about pharmacology too.

    Newcastle University has a Pharmacology course that states after Stage one 'You may also apply to transfer to our degree in Medicine or Dentistry (places are available on a competitive basis).'

    So would it be worth me applying for Pharmacology, with the hope of transferring to Medicine after my first year, or just applying for Medicine first?

    (Either way I will obviously be making sure I have the correct grades, etc for Medicine)
    Thanks.
    It's incredibly difficult to do the whole transferring in Newcastle thing, only 7 people transfer every year (the majority of the first year biomed/biomolecular students tend to want to transfer to either medicine or dentistry) and you have to get v. high grades to even be considered to apply. Probably better, if you really want to do medicine, as the above poster said, to apply for medicine and intercalate in pharmacology if you still wish to do so when you get to that stage.
    • 43 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by xconfetti)
    to apply for medicine and intercalate in pharmacology if you still wish to do so when you get to that stage.
    Which you probably won't. Because pharmacology blows.
    • 1 follower
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Beska)
    Which you probably won't. Because pharmacology blows.
    Not that the pharmacology you do as a medical student is anything like that you do in an actual pharmacology degree..
    • 43 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by theatrical)
    Not that the pharmacology you do as a medical student is anything like that you do in an actual pharmacology degree..
    I was being ridiculous facetious...
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lsaul95)
    Hi,

    I am interested in studying Medicine, however I also have an urging back bone to learn about pharmacology too.

    Newcastle University has a Pharmacology course that states after Stage one 'You may also apply to transfer to our degree in Medicine or Dentistry (places are available on a competitive basis).'

    So would it be worth me applying for Pharmacology, with the hope of transferring to Medicine after my first year, or just applying for Medicine first?

    (Either way I will obviously be making sure I have the correct grades, etc for Medicine)
    Thanks.
    Doesn't seem like a good idea to me. The transfer route is very competitive, the easiest way of getting into medicine (in relative terms) is as an undergraduate, if you have the grades. You could apply to the standard UG course and then intercalate as some have said already, this may give you a talking point in interview when then ask why you applied there. Or you could put Pharmacology as your backup choice and then do the graduate route. (if you were unsuccessful getting into med school)

    Although as you're considering this, I'm concerned as to how much you want to study medicine itself.

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: March 5, 2012
New on TSR

Join the Welcome Squad

Become a part of the TSR team!

Article updates
Reputation gems:
You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.