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How to quit my job?

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    I work as a waitress at a fine dining restaurant and hate it.
    No other reason, I just really dislike my job. The average hours I get in a week can range up to around 20 hours which is far too much for me I feel (I'm 16). It is very high pressure and I have been working there for two months and I just don't think the job suits me and I feel miserable about it. Also, shifts can go on to 3/4am at weekends and we work without breaks or food for what can go up to 10 hours which I'm pretty sure is illegal.
    So, basically, yeah, I just want to quit.
    My question is however, how?
    How do I tell them? There was no notice written on any of the forms I signed so can I just leave them in the lurch? Ring them up and never go back?
    Also, what is a reference? I hope to get another job not related to food or waitressing when I start college so will I desperately need it?
    Answers to any of these questions would be helpful. Thanks!
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    Anyone? Slightly desperate.
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    Just say you want to quit, and if you did a good job, your boss is not gonna give you a bad reference.
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    You should have a contract. It should say how much notice you need to give them, and usually it has to be done in writing. So it can just be a brief note, you don't need to explain why you want to go.

    It's best not to just walk out. A reference would be useful for any job. A new employer might be curious as to why you don't want your previous employer to be your referee. Unless you don't plan on mentioning it to anyone.
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    Hand in a written notice stating that your resigning and you'll work your notice period (whatever that is) and thank them for giving you the opportunity and wish them well blah blah. Leave on good terms as you will need a reference if you choose to use them in the future.
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    just say that you have alot of work to do from school right now and that you need to stop working for a while and will let them know later on when you can come back... but obviously dont go back lol.
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    (Original post by heyAmy)
    Anyone? Slightly desperate.
    tell your boss you feel your study/personal issues (delete as appropriate) are too much of a burden combined with the job and that you feel that the time has passed to try out other jobs for work experience on your C.V. and that you didnt fully understand and appreciate how hard and time consuming waitressing would be
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    (Original post by PJ991)
    You should have a contract. It should say how much notice you need to give them, and usually it has to be done in writing. So it can just be a brief note, you don't need to explain why you want to go.

    It's best not to just walk out. A reference would be useful for any job. A new employer might be curious as to why you don't want your previous employer to be your referee. Unless you don't plan on mentioning it to anyone.
    Definitely never got a contract, it was only part time.

    Do I actually need them to write me a reference? I was never late, always hard working etc. Or could I just write them as a reference on other job applications?
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    (Original post by heyAmy)
    I work as a waitress at a fine dining restaurant and hate it.
    No other reason, I just really dislike my job. The average hours I get in a week can range up to around 20 hours which is far too much for me I feel (I'm 16). It is very high pressure and I have been working there for two months and I just don't think the job suits me and I feel miserable about it. Also, shifts can go on to 3/4am at weekends and we work without breaks or food for what can go up to 10 hours which I'm pretty sure is illegal.
    So, basically, yeah, I just want to quit.
    My question is however, how?
    How do I tell them? There was no notice written on any of the forms I signed so can I just leave them in the lurch? Ring them up and never go back?
    Also, what is a reference? I hope to get another job not related to food or waitressing when I start college so will I desperately need it?
    Answers to any of these questions would be helpful. Thanks!
    Ask them how much notice you need to give to resign, this should bering up a conversation about it on what to do.

    Basically, in terms of references, don't piss them off and say thanks and w/e so you can use them for a reference if necessary.
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    (Original post by JAZZA007)
    tell your boss you feel your study/personal issues (delete as appropriate) are too much of a burden combined with the job and that you feel that the time has passed to try out other jobs for work experience on your C.V. and that you didnt fully understand and appreciate how hard and time consuming waitressing would be
    Thanks!
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    (Original post by heyAmy)
    Definitely never got a contract, it was only part time.

    Do I actually need them to write me a reference? I was never late, always hard working etc. Or could I just write them as a reference on other job applications?
    If you use that job on future applications than your future recruiter could call them up asking about you. Most jobs want you to state your last employer.
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    Sounds like you are casual so you won't necessarily need to work a formal notice period, but you it would be far more polite to give a written notice and give a date at which you will be leaving stipulating study pressures etc, be polite in the letter and don't insult them as a general rule

    Although many employers do now wish for a reference specifically written for them it may be best to ask for a reference from them as you leave and permission for future employers to contact them. It's polite to ask first and the chances are they may not really remember you in two years time when it comes to you getting a new job or whenever.

    In terms of the law I believe you should be allowed to take a 10 minute paid break after 4 hours work and a half hour unpaid break if you work 6 hours or more. (We have to take the half hour break if we work over 6 hours where I work as they won't pay us for it).
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    (Original post by heyAmy)
    Also, what is a reference?
    A reference is something an employer usually wants as part of a successful job application. Usually only the very most basic, entry level jobs don't need references, or jobs with very strictly formulated entry qualifications. So most employers will ask for references.

    However, they don't usually ask for references until they are about to, or have offered you a job (subject to references). It takes time and money to check references, so they usually only do it for the one person they intend to offer the job (school jobs and other roles with strict governance rules may take up references before interview, in which case they say so and ask for permission).

    A reference is given by a Referee. Usually a Referee is a person who knows you in a professional capacity, usually your most recent line manager in a job. Most employers want a second reference so you need a second Referee, often a tutor if you are at College/uni, or a teacher from school.

    Friends and relatives are not usually eligible to be Referees. This is because the Referee is supposed to be staking his/her professional reputation on the statement they are making about you. If they write you are great, when in fact you are a lousy worker, it reflects badly on their professional judgement (as well as being illegal in many cases). It is just custom that friends and family are deemed to have a stronger impulse to support you, than to defend a professional reputation, so they can't be Referees.

    You should always ask a person if they will stand as a Referee for you before you put their details on an application form, or give their details to a potential employer. This then gives them the opportunity to decline, rather than give you a bad reference. If you don't ask first, and then get a bad reference, you've only yourself to blame.

    So you need to leave this job in a friendly, organised manner so that you can keep the Manager as a Referee. When you leave, ask the Manager if they will act as a Referee in the future, and if they say yes, ask for their email address, postal address and phone number. A future employer may have a preference as to which means of contact they use.

    A pre-written letter of reference/recommendation has very limited value. It might work for very small businesses. However, many larger employers have specific questions and facts they want to check, and they want to make direct contact themselves with the Referee, not go through you.
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    Same predicament as you! Need to ensure i have a job before leaving though! Don't know how i will tell my boss:/ i have been there the longest and he always relies on me for everything.

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Updated: May 25, 2012
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