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Edexcel Unit 4: Life on the Margins - The Food Supply Problem

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    Yay! The pre-release day has finally come :P

    This is what it says:

    Explore the characteristics of a range of current socio-economic, political and environmental issues affecting food insecurity in both rural and urban areas.

    Research contrasting rural and urban locations, at different levels of development, that experience a range of issues linked to food insecurity.

    Glad it's on casues of food insecurity rather than management and desertification! (ESPECIALLY desertification! :P) However, it's still a HUGEEEEE topic!

    Anyone got any ideas of how we should go about on this report? Possible case studies? All thoughts are welcome
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    I haven't had a lesson yet, but I will definatily post any resources I have when I do.
    I am fairly happy with it I think. Would have been happy with management but very glad it's not desertification
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    (Original post by Alicelouise134)
    I haven't had a lesson yet, but I will definatily post any resources I have when I do.
    I am fairly happy with it I think. Would have been happy with management but very glad it's not desertification
    I've had a lesson on it however we just analysed the question (in that it's asking you to research only the causes of food insecurity and that it has to be 'current' and that it shouldn't really be focused on solutions...)

    However I'm not that great a human geography (only doing this option as the rest of the class decided to do it unanimously) and I much prefer physical geography however looking at the physical options I'm glad I went with Life on the Margins as it seems to be the simplest out of all of them, although the topic of food insecurity is sooooo broad.

    You don't know how much I would appreciate it if you guys were kind enough to post up some resources here, I haven't got any more lessons of geography as my teacher decided to go and take her maternity leave right before my exams start and to be honest I'm absolutely crap at independent research
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    Is it really causes???

    That's what I thought, but my teacher is telling us that it is to do with "issues" from the first section of the spec, so about obesity, food miles, globalisation of food tastes etc.

    Anyone shed some light on this? I'm so confused
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    (Original post by DylanLJG)
    Is it really causes???

    That's what I thought, but my teacher is telling us that it is to do with "issues" from the first section of the spec, so about obesity, food miles, globalisation of food tastes etc.

    Anyone shed some light on this? I'm so confused
    I thought it was on causes, and so did my teacher.
    Although now you've mentioned this I am curious, it does specifically say issues. So I am super unsure now.
    Any ideas?!
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    (Original post by DylanLJG)
    Is it really causes???

    That's what I thought, but my teacher is telling us that it is to do with "issues" from the first section of the spec, so about obesity, food miles, globalisation of food tastes etc.

    Anyone shed some light on this? I'm so confused

    My teacher has said the same thing, under and over nutrition, food miles, food production methods....
    you need case studies for each of the issues.
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    my teacher has come up with some questions that she thinks will come up:

    1.evaluate the range of factors which lead to food insecurity in rural and urban areas.
    2. the factors that affect food insecurity differer between rural and urban areas. discuss

    can anybody help me with findings case studies for rural and urban areas of sub-saharan africa and the socio-economic, environmental and political factors causing them food insecurity.

    i'm desperate to find soem case studies
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    Any updates on how this is going for everyone? :woo:
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    (Original post by sarahsmith_1994)
    my teacher has come up with some questions that she thinks will come up:

    1.evaluate the range of factors which lead to food insecurity in rural and urban areas.
    2. the factors that affect food insecurity differer between rural and urban areas. discuss

    can anybody help me with findings case studies for rural and urban areas of sub-saharan africa and the socio-economic, environmental and political factors causing them food insecurity.

    i'm desperate to find soem case studies
    Hopefull I can help
    The way I did it was to list all my case studies and put next to them whether they were Rural/Urban Socio-economic/poitical/environmental and MEDC/NIC/LEDC. This isn't the only way to do it, but I find it to help. By this method you can also create match-ups e.g. overnutrition (USA) vs undernutrition (Somalia). So here's my lists of Case studies:

    Obesity in China - Urban, Socio-economic, NIC

    China's Food Insecurity - Rural and Urban, socio-economic, NIC

    Famine in Somalia - Both, socio-economic/political/environmental, LEDC <---this one's good cause you can pick and choose what you wanna focus on e.g. for socio-economic factors you can talk about the food prices rises of 2008 (i think), political there's political instabilty the sort of sets the tone for entirety of Africa as well as Al-Shabaab (terrorists) who shut down food supply routes for aid organisation. For enviro you have erratic rainfall leading to drought and therefore famine etc.

    Pests (locusts and stuff) - Rural, Environmental, MEDC (USA)/ NIC (China)/ LEDC (Any African country, I prefer Ethiopia)

    Ethiopia Famine - Rural/Urban, Environmental/Socio-economic/Political, LEDC Remember for that Ethiopia's famine was mainly down to erratic rainfall, but you can also talk about % of national budget spent on war instead of more appropriate technology for food production or how pressure is put on the nation from migrants escaping famines in places like Somalia.

    Eritrea - Urban/Rural, Political/Envrio/Socio-eco, LEDC. In my class we were taught the case study of Ethiopia and Eritrea as one because of their military history, so don't be afraid to condense the two. You'll see a trend that many of the African case studies have a mixture of everything leading to their food insecurity.

    Cattle Ranching in the High Plains, USA - Rural, Socio-economic and Enviro, MEDC. This case study outline how Americans have reached a state of developement in which they can afford to use inappropriate farming techniques on what should be used for arable farming, thus creating my next case study.

    The US dust bowl - Rural, Environmental and socio-economic, MEDC. Not a recent case study (It occured during an 8-year long drought between 1931 and 1939) however you can mention it's historical importance as it came about due to inappropriate farming methods.

    Kalahandi Syndrome - Rural, Socio-economic and political, NIC and LEDC. This is the idea that farmers grow cash crops to satisfy the global markets rather than feeding themselves, usually become they have to make money to pay for the land that they are farming and living on. Originating in India, if you do some research you'll turn up some dark stuff such as mass suicides over the whole event. Great case study as it outlines the how money can often be considered as more important than food.

    Burkina Faso Famine - Rural and Urban, Enviro, Political and Socio-eco, LEDC. Another African case study which has all the regular features of political instability and erratic rainfall. However, this famine (April this year if I recall correctly) was partly due to the loss of jobs in the fishing industry in the Ivory Coast leading to a decrease in funds returning home so the poor couldn't afford staple foods.

    The Sahel - Rural, Environmental, LEDC. The Sahel is the region just outside of the Sahara, countries like Burkina Faso and Mali have part of the Sahel within their borders. The Sahel often causes desertification and harsh growing conditions with nomadic pastorialists roaming and putting pressure on each country they pass. More desertification than anything else, but it's worth putting here just for the future.

    The Great Green Wall of Africa - Rural, Socio-economic, enviro and political, LEDC. This is a huge project involving 11 African nations attempting to construct a wall 7,775km long to keep out encroaching Sahara sand. Similar to following case study.

    The Great Green Wall of China - Rural, Socio-economic and enviromental, NIC. The original guys behind the green wall concept, aims to stop encroaching Gobi sands from spoiling rural farmlands which China desperately needs. Grab yo'self some reseach!

    Cuapa Kokoo Fairtrade Co-operative - Rural, Political and Socio-economic, LEDC. This case study outlines the importance of free trade in bringing development to Africa, and thus helping to resolve food security. This case study is in the A2 book so give it a little look and keep it in mind just incase you need a solution. Be aware however that free trade is under criticism as a form of neo-colonialism (former world powers exerting influence over LEDC's) and as such it may not be as great as it sounds.

    Green and Gene (GM) Revolution -Rural, Socio-eco and enviro, MEDC and NIC (GM) and LEDC MEDC and NIC for green rev. The Green revolution (1960's) and Gene Revolution (1990's) explain the attempts to create advances in yeild from crops and farmlands. Be aware the the green revolution mostly passed Africa by and GM crops are often too expensive for African farmers to afford. Should both be in the A2 book. Also be aware of the plans of a new green revolution for Africa (AGRA) funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates and Rockerfeller foundations.

    Women and HYV's - Rural, Socio-economic, NIC. This case study outlines the importance of taking local decision making and tastes when attempting to apply solutions to food insecurity. Focusing on India, it explains how farmer's rejected High Yielding Varieties (HYV's) of rice because of its poor flavour and cooking qualities, not to mention how researchers overlooked the key role of women in rice production.

    Golden Rice - Neither, Socio-economic, MEDC. This case study outlines how GM can solve common problems within the population. It foucses on Golden Rice which seem to be a solution to the common Vitamin A micro-nutrient deficiency. It outline strengths and weaknesses of the plan. Research this, it's definately worth keeping just in case.

    Desertification in MEDC's - Rural, Socio-economic and envrio, MEDC. This case study outlines how MEDC's can fall victim to desertification (the USA for instance) without the aftermath of famine. Perhaps not so useful for this exam this time, but we'll keep it here for future reference.

    I hope this helps, if you need anymore i'll do my best to find some or if you need anything explained i'll answer A.S.A.P! I'm taking the exam on the 19th as well so good luck to you all!
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    (Original post by Jackjack996)
    Hopefull I can help
    The way I did it was to list all my case studies and put next to them whether they were Rural/Urban Socio-economic/poitical/environmental and MEDC/NIC/LEDC. This isn't the only way to do it, but I find it to help. By this method you can also create match-ups e.g. overnutrition (USA) vs undernutrition (Somalia). So here's my lists of Case studies:

    Obesity in China - Urban, Socio-economic, NIC

    China's Food Insecurity - Rural and Urban, socio-economic, NIC

    Famine in Somalia - Both, socio-economic/political/environmental, LEDC <---this one's good cause you can pick and choose what you wanna focus on e.g. for socio-economic factors you can talk about the food prices rises of 2008 (i think), political there's political instabilty the sort of sets the tone for entirety of Africa as well as Al-Shabaab (terrorists) who shut down food supply routes for aid organisation. For enviro you have erratic rainfall leading to drought and therefore famine etc.

    Pests (locusts and stuff) - Rural, Environmental, MEDC (USA)/ NIC (China)/ LEDC (Any African country, I prefer Ethiopia)

    Ethiopia Famine - Rural/Urban, Environmental/Socio-economic/Political, LEDC Remember for that Ethiopia's famine was mainly down to erratic rainfall, but you can also talk about % of national budget spent on war instead of more appropriate technology for food production or how pressure is put on the nation from migrants escaping famines in places like Somalia.

    Eritrea - Urban/Rural, Political/Envrio/Socio-eco, LEDC. In my class we were taught the case study of Ethiopia and Eritrea as one because of their military history, so don't be afraid to condense the two. You'll see a trend that many of the African case studies have a mixture of everything leading to their food insecurity.

    Cattle Ranching in the High Plains, USA - Rural, Socio-economic and Enviro, MEDC. This case study outline how Americans have reached a state of developement in which they can afford to use inappropriate farming techniques on what should be used for arable farming, thus creating my next case study.

    The US dust bowl - Rural, Environmental and socio-economic, MEDC. Not a recent case study (It occured during an 8-year long drought between 1931 and 1939) however you can mention it's historical importance as it came about due to inappropriate farming methods.

    Kalahandi Syndrome - Rural, Socio-economic and political, NIC and LEDC. This is the idea that farmers grow cash crops to satisfy the global markets rather than feeding themselves, usually become they have to make money to pay for the land that they are farming and living on. Originating in India, if you do some research you'll turn up some dark stuff such as mass suicides over the whole event. Great case study as it outlines the how money can often be considered as more important than food.

    Burkina Faso Famine - Rural and Urban, Enviro, Political and Socio-eco, LEDC. Another African case study which has all the regular features of political instability and erratic rainfall. However, this famine (April this year if I recall correctly) was partly due to the loss of jobs in the fishing industry in the Ivory Coast leading to a decrease in funds returning home so the poor couldn't afford staple foods.

    The Sahel - Rural, Environmental, LEDC. The Sahel is the region just outside of the Sahara, countries like Burkina Faso and Mali have part of the Sahel within their borders. The Sahel often causes desertification and harsh growing conditions with nomadic pastorialists roaming and putting pressure on each country they pass. More desertification than anything else, but it's worth putting here just for the future.

    The Great Green Wall of Africa - Rural, Socio-economic, enviro and political, LEDC. This is a huge project involving 11 African nations attempting to construct a wall 7,775km long to keep out encroaching Sahara sand. Similar to following case study.

    The Great Green Wall of China - Rural, Socio-economic and enviromental, NIC. The original guys behind the green wall concept, aims to stop encroaching Gobi sands from spoiling rural farmlands which China desperately needs. Grab yo'self some reseach!

    Cuapa Kokoo Fairtrade Co-operative - Rural, Political and Socio-economic, LEDC. This case study outlines the importance of free trade in bringing development to Africa, and thus helping to resolve food security. This case study is in the A2 book so give it a little look and keep it in mind just incase you need a solution. Be aware however that free trade is under criticism as a form of neo-colonialism (former world powers exerting influence over LEDC's) and as such it may not be as great as it sounds.

    Green and Gene (GM) Revolution -Rural, Socio-eco and enviro, MEDC and NIC (GM) and LEDC MEDC and NIC for green rev. The Green revolution (1960's) and Gene Revolution (1990's) explain the attempts to create advances in yeild from crops and farmlands. Be aware the the green revolution mostly passed Africa by and GM crops are often too expensive for African farmers to afford. Should both be in the A2 book. Also be aware of the plans of a new green revolution for Africa (AGRA) funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates and Rockerfeller foundations.

    Women and HYV's - Rural, Socio-economic, NIC. This case study outlines the importance of taking local decision making and tastes when attempting to apply solutions to food insecurity. Focusing on India, it explains how farmer's rejected High Yielding Varieties (HYV's) of rice because of its poor flavour and cooking qualities, not to mention how researchers overlooked the key role of women in rice production.

    Golden Rice - Neither, Socio-economic, MEDC. This case study outlines how GM can solve common problems within the population. It foucses on Golden Rice which seem to be a solution to the common Vitamin A micro-nutrient deficiency. It outline strengths and weaknesses of the plan. Research this, it's definately worth keeping just in case.

    Desertification in MEDC's - Rural, Socio-economic and envrio, MEDC. This case study outlines how MEDC's can fall victim to desertification (the USA for instance) without the aftermath of famine. Perhaps not so useful for this exam this time, but we'll keep it here for future reference.

    I hope this helps, if you need anymore i'll do my best to find some or if you need anything explained i'll answer A.S.A.P! I'm taking the exam on the 19th as well so good luck to you all!
    OMG. Thank you so much!
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    Anyone have any ideas on possible questions that will come up?

    Also - how are people planning to structure their answers?

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by strange ghost)
    Anyone have any ideas on possible questions that will come up?

    Also - how are people planning to structure their answers?

    Thanks!
    Another reply for you eh? :P
    My structure will be:
    -Intro: definitions and general waffling
    -Methodology: What sources im gonna talk about, what case studies, where some of my quotes will be from etc.
    -Main body of the essay numbered into different sections each with its own sub-conclusion.
    -Final conclusion
    -Bibliography

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    (Original post by Jackjack996)
    Another reply for you eh? :P
    My structure will be:
    -Intro: definitions and general waffling
    -Methodology: What sources im gonna talk about, what case studies, where some of my quotes will be from etc.
    -Main body of the essay numbered into different sections each with its own sub-conclusion.
    -Final conclusion
    -Bibliography

    Hi! Thanks for the PM too

    When I meant structure, I was sort of referring to the main body, but obviously this depends on the question.

    I figured it's likely that rural vs urban will be part of the question (since it's in both the explore and research parts of the pre-release!) so I thought:

    1. RURAL
    1.1 Env issues
    1.2 Socio-ec issues
    1.3 political issues
    1.4 sub-conc

    2. URBAN
    2.1 env issues
    2.2
    2.3
    2.4 sub conclusion

    3. Conclusion

    well, obviously intro + methodology would be parts 1 + 2, so the numbers are a bit wrong, but I think you get the idea...

    I'm just concerned that having two large sections will 4 sub-sections will look too chopped up? I'd usually have a thematic link going between sections but sometimes I write rubbish in the exam


    What do we think?


    Oh, and I definitely think rural vs urban insecurity will be a hook in the question. Might be wrong, so no one take my word for it.
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    (Original post by strange ghost)
    Anyone have any ideas on possible questions that will come up?

    Also - how are people planning to structure their answers?

    Thanks!
    Assess the extent to which a range of issues affecting food insecurity differ between rural and urban areas

    I'm planning on structuring it by environmental, socio-economic and political with two sub sections in each such as climate change, land degradation, population growth, affordability, conflict and poor governance. Then in each section I will discuss how they differ between rural and urban. Obviously with intro, methodology and conclusion as well.
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    (Original post by Jackjack996)
    Another reply for you eh? :P
    My structure will be:
    -Intro: definitions and general waffling
    -Methodology: What sources im gonna talk about, what case studies, where some of my quotes will be from etc.
    -Main body of the essay numbered into different sections each with its own sub-conclusion.
    -Final conclusion
    -Bibliography

    The main part to this report we'll be writing will most probably be about the contrast of food insecurity in rural and urban.
    Although I will be explaining about how different issues affect food insecurity for example, natural hazards (an environmental issue) creates desertified land and thus affecting the AVAILABILITY of food.

    The thing my teacher has drilled into our brains is that the question can be anything, maybe just the economic issue, or just the political, or contrasting developments (rather than rural and urban).


    Structure:
    Intro
    - Definition
    - Focus
    - Framework and model
    - Methodology

    Main Body:
    - Economic
    - Rural
    - Urban
    - Subconclusion of the contrasts between the two

    Same again for env and pol

    Conclusion:
    - A repeat of the subconclusions of the previous 3 issues.
    - Overall
    - Problems and anomolies

    so yeah.. 70 marks and ****
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    So is the focus of the question defintly going to be a comparison of rural and urban. I've prepared all my case studies in terms of causes, not sure how to differentiate between urban and rural as the problems seem to be country/area related and not specific to rural/urban. Getting myself very confused now :/ any clarification would be helpful
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    How many case studies do you do for the main body? And which ones are you guys doing? Extremely unprepared for this paper


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
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    (Original post by cheekymonkey_x)
    How many case studies do you do for the main body? And which ones are you guys doing? Extremely unprepared for this paper


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    I have around 16-18 case studies (environmental, socio-economic and political all together) which range from urban to rural and HICs, NICs and LICs.

    Obviously you'd never have time in 1.5hrs to go through ALL of them in detail, but some are just to 'drop in' as examples (like throwing in a statistic for a rural case study to contrast an urban one you just wrote about)

    I think the important thing is to structure and write conceptually and use relevant snippets of case studies to illustrate your points.

    Rule of thumb is DO NOT write something unless it adds to the argument/analysis OR proves/backs up your point. aanything else is probably just descriptive and won't really gain you marks or anything.


    I don't feel as prepared for this exam as I want to be
    BUT we still have the rest of today AND the whole day tomorrow... so let's get some good revision in


    I'm struggling to remember the 'references' though you know, like [Edexcel A2 geog, 2009] etc... It's kind of annoying to have to 'revise' a list of them with my notes so I can put them in, but apparently if you don't reference (not everything, but enough) then you drop QWC marks! And that's 10 easy marks...

    Intro - 10
    Research/methodology - 15
    QWC - 10

    These are the EASIEST marks to get... so if you get full marks/close to then that's already 35 marks! Then you'll just need 20/35 for the 'main body' to get an A!

    Hope that makes people feel a little less uneasy... I know it made me feel a little bit better haha
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    (Original post by Jackjack996)
    Hopefull I can help
    The way I did it was to list all my case studies and put next to them whether they were Rural/Urban Socio-economic/poitical/environmental and MEDC/NIC/LEDC. This isn't the only way to do it, but I find it to help. By this method you can also create match-ups e.g. overnutrition (USA) vs undernutrition (Somalia). So here's my lists of Case studies:

    Obesity in China - Urban, Socio-economic, NIC

    China's Food Insecurity - Rural and Urban, socio-economic, NIC

    Famine in Somalia - Both, socio-economic/political/environmental, LEDC <---this one's good cause you can pick and choose what you wanna focus on e.g. for socio-economic factors you can talk about the food prices rises of 2008 (i think), political there's political instabilty the sort of sets the tone for entirety of Africa as well as Al-Shabaab (terrorists) who shut down food supply routes for aid organisation. For enviro you have erratic rainfall leading to drought and therefore famine etc.

    Pests (locusts and stuff) - Rural, Environmental, MEDC (USA)/ NIC (China)/ LEDC (Any African country, I prefer Ethiopia)

    Ethiopia Famine - Rural/Urban, Environmental/Socio-economic/Political, LEDC Remember for that Ethiopia's famine was mainly down to erratic rainfall, but you can also talk about % of national budget spent on war instead of more appropriate technology for food production or how pressure is put on the nation from migrants escaping famines in places like Somalia.

    Eritrea - Urban/Rural, Political/Envrio/Socio-eco, LEDC. In my class we were taught the case study of Ethiopia and Eritrea as one because of their military history, so don't be afraid to condense the two. You'll see a trend that many of the African case studies have a mixture of everything leading to their food insecurity.

    Cattle Ranching in the High Plains, USA - Rural, Socio-economic and Enviro, MEDC. This case study outline how Americans have reached a state of developement in which they can afford to use inappropriate farming techniques on what should be used for arable farming, thus creating my next case study.

    The US dust bowl - Rural, Environmental and socio-economic, MEDC. Not a recent case study (It occured during an 8-year long drought between 1931 and 1939) however you can mention it's historical importance as it came about due to inappropriate farming methods.

    Kalahandi Syndrome - Rural, Socio-economic and political, NIC and LEDC. This is the idea that farmers grow cash crops to satisfy the global markets rather than feeding themselves, usually become they have to make money to pay for the land that they are farming and living on. Originating in India, if you do some research you'll turn up some dark stuff such as mass suicides over the whole event. Great case study as it outlines the how money can often be considered as more important than food.

    Burkina Faso Famine - Rural and Urban, Enviro, Political and Socio-eco, LEDC. Another African case study which has all the regular features of political instability and erratic rainfall. However, this famine (April this year if I recall correctly) was partly due to the loss of jobs in the fishing industry in the Ivory Coast leading to a decrease in funds returning home so the poor couldn't afford staple foods.

    The Sahel - Rural, Environmental, LEDC. The Sahel is the region just outside of the Sahara, countries like Burkina Faso and Mali have part of the Sahel within their borders. The Sahel often causes desertification and harsh growing conditions with nomadic pastorialists roaming and putting pressure on each country they pass. More desertification than anything else, but it's worth putting here just for the future.

    The Great Green Wall of Africa - Rural, Socio-economic, enviro and political, LEDC. This is a huge project involving 11 African nations attempting to construct a wall 7,775km long to keep out encroaching Sahara sand. Similar to following case study.

    The Great Green Wall of China - Rural, Socio-economic and enviromental, NIC. The original guys behind the green wall concept, aims to stop encroaching Gobi sands from spoiling rural farmlands which China desperately needs. Grab yo'self some reseach!

    Cuapa Kokoo Fairtrade Co-operative - Rural, Political and Socio-economic, LEDC. This case study outlines the importance of free trade in bringing development to Africa, and thus helping to resolve food security. This case study is in the A2 book so give it a little look and keep it in mind just incase you need a solution. Be aware however that free trade is under criticism as a form of neo-colonialism (former world powers exerting influence over LEDC's) and as such it may not be as great as it sounds.

    Green and Gene (GM) Revolution -Rural, Socio-eco and enviro, MEDC and NIC (GM) and LEDC MEDC and NIC for green rev. The Green revolution (1960's) and Gene Revolution (1990's) explain the attempts to create advances in yeild from crops and farmlands. Be aware the the green revolution mostly passed Africa by and GM crops are often too expensive for African farmers to afford. Should both be in the A2 book. Also be aware of the plans of a new green revolution for Africa (AGRA) funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates and Rockerfeller foundations.

    Women and HYV's - Rural, Socio-economic, NIC. This case study outlines the importance of taking local decision making and tastes when attempting to apply solutions to food insecurity. Focusing on India, it explains how farmer's rejected High Yielding Varieties (HYV's) of rice because of its poor flavour and cooking qualities, not to mention how researchers overlooked the key role of women in rice production.

    Golden Rice - Neither, Socio-economic, MEDC. This case study outlines how GM can solve common problems within the population. It foucses on Golden Rice which seem to be a solution to the common Vitamin A micro-nutrient deficiency. It outline strengths and weaknesses of the plan. Research this, it's definately worth keeping just in case.

    Desertification in MEDC's - Rural, Socio-economic and envrio, MEDC. This case study outlines how MEDC's can fall victim to desertification (the USA for instance) without the aftermath of famine. Perhaps not so useful for this exam this time, but we'll keep it here for future reference.

    I hope this helps, if you need anymore i'll do my best to find some or if you need anything explained i'll answer A.S.A.P! I'm taking the exam on the 19th as well so good luck to you all!
    You absolute star!

    roughly how long would you write for each case study and how many would you do in a report?
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    (Original post by cheekymonkey_x)
    You absolute star!

    roughly how long would you write for each case study and how many would you do in a report?
    Well it depends entirely on the question.
    Personally I aim to write about a paragraph to two paragraphs on about 8 or so casestudies, so 4 for rural and 4 for urban; detailing the different factors.
    If you don't think you could manage 8 or if the question doesn't permit for it then make sure that you have 3 or 4 that you know in depth and a few others to chuck in to support yourself

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