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MSc Economics module broadness

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    I have a simple question about MSc Economics that could really assist me in my choice of Undergrad course as I am determined to attain a masters degree.
    If you take Economics BSc and you take quantitative optional modules such as Econometrics, do you, at MSc level, have the opportunity to study modules containing content that you missed out on totally at BSc, eg Labour Economics, or do you have to have done the BSc Labour Economics option to take and undertstand the MSc module? Essentially, do they allow you to start afresh in a new area or is it building upon only undergrad modules?
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    Hey,

    For almost all MSc's it's a totally free choice and there are no pre-requisites barring you from taking an elective if you hadn't taken a module in it at undergrad.

    The MSc is highly technical and doing well in the undergraduate quantitative courses will help you both to get admission to good programs and have a higher chance of performing better on those programs. The trade off is that the quantitative programs are perhaps not as interesting as some of the other electives.

    Also, take a look at a few MSc courses, not all are the same and some offer less flexibility. At LSE, for example, students usually taken only one elective.

    Have a word with your professors and let them know you want to go on to the MSc. They will like the fact that you are interested in postgraduate study and will be able to guide you in the best courses to take.

    Good luck!

    AW







    (Original post by SonnyBeatle)
    I have a simple question about MSc Economics that could really assist me in my choice of Undergrad course as I am determined to attain a masters degree.
    If you take Economics BSc and you take quantitative optional modules such as Econometrics, do you, at MSc level, have the opportunity to study modules containing content that you missed out on totally at BSc, eg Labour Economics, or do you have to have done the BSc Labour Economics option to take and undertstand the MSc module? Essentially, do they allow you to start afresh in a new area or is it building upon only undergrad modules?
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    I certainly intend to take Mathematical and Econometric modules as my options at undergraduate level, as I am aware this will get me into MSc courses. However topics that interest me are Labour, Industrial, Public, Trade and Monetary Economics. Warwick allows it's students to take 3 options, which seems like a decent number to choose. However If MSc Econometrics will be a duplication of BSc content that I would be less certain about taking such options at undergraduate level. Would It be a good idea for me to do Interesting stuff at BSc before trying for an MSc?
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    Hey,

    Sounds like you're really enjoying your undergrad! At MSc level it's all a bit tougher - and there's much more maths. The econometrics isn't an exact duplication, a lot of it will be familiar from undergrad but you'll cover things in more depth. If you've scored highly in the core second year courses then there's no real need to take more technical courses. Have a chat with the course organisers and see what they advise.

    Good luck!!

    AW




    (Original post by SonnyBeatle)
    I certainly intend to take Mathematical and Econometric modules as my options at undergraduate level, as I am aware this will get me into MSc courses. However topics that interest me are Labour, Industrial, Finance, Trade and Monetary Economics. Warwick allows it's students to take 3 options, which seems like a decent number to choose. However If MSc Econometrics will be a duplication of BSc content that I would be less certain about taking such options at undergraduate level. Would It be a good idea for me to do Interesting stuff at BSc before trying for an MSc?
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    (Original post by SonnyBeatle)
    I have a simple question about MSc Economics that could really assist me in my choice of Undergrad course as I am determined to attain a masters degree.
    If you take Economics BSc and you take quantitative optional modules such as Econometrics, do you, at MSc level, have the opportunity to study modules containing content that you missed out on totally at BSc, eg Labour Economics, or do you have to have done the BSc Labour Economics option to take and undertstand the MSc module? Essentially, do they allow you to start afresh in a new area or is it building upon only undergrad modules?
    Actually, I have taken a look at quite a few MSc Econ programs and was rather disappointed. There is not much of a choice in terms of electives. You have to take Micro I and II, Macro I and II, and Econometrics. This is almost always the case. After that, given that most UK programs are one year, you hardly have much time left. Usually there are 3 or 4 electives, but they can only be taken in the end and you have to see what this particular program has to offer.

    If you want to have more choice in terms of the electives I would suggest looking for 2 year Masters programs, like one at Oxford, or going some place outside UK.
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    4 electives is fine, I'd only really want to do Labour, Monetary, Industrial, Trade, and Public. I'd do one of those at undergrad level anyway. Also, Warwick do Maths and Stats as part of the course.
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    1- Where are you doing your undergrad?
    2- Where are you applying for postgrad?

    The more quantitative modules you do at undergrad, the better. Also the overlap between say advanced econometrics at undergrad and the core econometrics at postgrad depends entirely on the universities in question. Pretty much all universities have their MSc follow on directly from their own BSc. Hence if you go to a top uni and do advanced quantitative modules and then go to a technically weak MSc programme at a pretty weak university, you're unlikely to cover anything new.

    On the other hand, the reverse is true. So if you go to a good uni for your BSc, choose very quantitative modules, and then go to an even better university for your MSc, there will be a noticeable step up and hence doing the more quantitative modules during your BSc will help to bridge the gap.

    Apart from that, the MSc tends to be much more quantitative and none of the optional modules (i.e.: trade, labour, industrial, etc.) will require more than the preliminary maths/stats module and also the core micro/macro module covered during the MSc.

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