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Converting CIE A-Level grades to 4.0 Scale GPA

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    Hi everyone, I have seen this question asked many times without any proper answers, so I thought this should be the right moment for me to end such dilemma (Yes, I am a very smart guy, thanks :yes: ).

    First of all, what is the equivalent of "A-Level" courses in the US universities?

    We get such an answer from the British Council website, the OFFICIAL ORIGINAL AUTHENTICATED website, here:
    http://www.britishcouncil.org/usa-ed...tmGlossary#_a_

    If you don't want to open the links:
    Exams taken by English, Northern Irish and Welsh students in order to gain entrance to UK university, similar to Advanced Placement (AP) tests.

    So A Level in UK=AP in USA

    Now, how to calculate the CIE (A Level) GPA?
    From the OFFICIAL ORIGINAL AUTHENTICATED CIE website, here:
    http://www.cie.org.uk/docs/recogniti...or%20IGCSE.pdf
    Oo, but that is for IGCSE, not A Levels?
    Oh, you mean the O Level courses? never mind.
    Forget about the A Level for a while, and let's see the PDF:
    CIE US
    A,A* A
    B A-
    C B
    D C+
    E C
    F D+
    G D
    U F (FAIL)
    Alright, now the Numerical Values for the above US alpha grades are as follows (from the same PDF):
    A 4.0
    A- 3.7
    B+ 3.3
    B 3.0
    B- 2.7
    C+ 2.3
    C 2.0
    C- 1.7
    D+ 1.3
    D 1.0
    (This is seems to be the standard US values, I have found them on many webstes, here forexample:
    http://www.ncu.edu.tw/~joshua/gpa_charts.htm)
    Therefore we have:
    CIE Numerical US
    A* 4.0
    A 4.0
    B 3.7
    C 3.0
    D 2.3
    E 2.0
    F 1.3
    G 1.0 (Least possible passing US Numerical Grade, I guess)
    Alright till now?
    Now what is so special about AP (which are the equivalent to A Level) courses when calculating the GPA?
    Let's take the "OAK PARK HIGH SCHOOL" for example, how do they add A Level courses to the GPA?
    Here:
    http://www.ophs.opusd.k12.ca.us/gpa_&_class_rank.htm
    If you don't want to open the link:
    AP courses receive 1 extra point.
    Got it everybody?

    THAT SIMPLY, MEANS THAT EVERY AP COURSE (EQUIVALENT TO A LEVEL COURSE) RECEIVES 1 EXTRA POINT!!!

    For example, If I got A in an A-Level Mathematics, that would have the Numerical value of 5 (the O Level numerical value of A=4, add 1 extra point, 4+1=5), Got it?

    Another Example:
    I studied (for real) 8 O Level subjects, my Grades were as follows:
    Mathematics A*
    Chemistry A
    Accounting A
    Physics B
    Biology B
    IT B
    Arabic C
    English C
    That would be a GPA of (4+4+4+3.7+3.7+3.7+3.0+3.0)/8=3.64
    (That wat of calculation is from the above CIE pdf file, nothing I came by if from myself)
    Then I studied 2 A Level Subjects:
    Mathematics B
    Chemistry C
    They would have the numerical values of 3.7+3.0 respectively, plus 1 Extra Point for each of them, that would be 4.7+4.0 respectively.
    Then we calculate the GPA:
    (4+4+4+3.7+3.7+3.7+3.0+3.0+4.7+4)/10=3.78

    GOT IT everyone?

    (No wonder my IQ is 144, that's 2 points less than the US president)
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    OK question. I had to take the (stupid) PE short course and ended up with a B. If it wasn't for that, I'd have a 4.0! But apparently in the US they don't count PE grades into the GPA. So what happens here?

    Also, since PE is short course, it counts less than the normal IGCSE - so do I count it as half, or do I not count it at all?
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    This forum is great!! thanks so much!
    So sorry but I dont understand!
    What would the following A levels be: A, B, B (and a C in AS level)

    Thanks so muhc! :yes:
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    It's hard to say, A levels are much harder than US examinations since they put more emphasis on things like SATs.
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    Also, since PE is short course, it counts less than the normal IGCSE - so do I count it as half, or do I not count it at all?
    No, Actually it doesn't count (as far as I know), so I guess you shouldn't count it too.

    So sorry but I dont understand!
    What would the following A levels be: A, B, B (and a C in AS level)
    Well, read the above example, first of all you convert the A-Level grades into their equivalent US grades according to the tables in this file:
    http://www.cie.org.uk/docs/recogniti...or%20IGCSE.pdf
    Then you add one 1 extra point to the numerical value of each A-Level subject, and 0.5 to each AS-Level one, since the AS-Level is half the weighting of
    an A Level and is typically awarded half the credit value; see this document here:
    http://www.cambridgeschool.ro/csb/Ca..._Factsheet.pdf

    Therefore, An A A-Level would have a US Numerical value of 4.0+1=5
    B in the A-Level would have a US Numerical value of 3.7+1=4.7
    C in the AS-Level would have a US Numerical value of 3.0+0.5=3.5
    Then you add all the Numerical values and divide them by the number of courses (just like the very first PDF says)
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    (Original post by Mahran)
    Hi everyone, I have seen this question asked many times without any proper answers, so I thought this should be the right moment for me to end such dilemma (Yes, I am a very smart guy, thanks :yes: ).

    First of all, what is the equivalent of "A-Level" courses in the US universities?

    We get such an answer from the British Council website, the OFFICIAL ORIGINAL AUTHENTICATED website, here:
    http://www.britishcouncil.org/usa-ed...tmGlossary#_a_

    If you don't want to open the links:
    Exams taken by English, Northern Irish and Welsh students in order to gain entrance to UK university, similar to Advanced Placement (AP) tests.

    So A Level in UK=AP in USA

    Now, how to calculate the CIE (A Level) GPA?
    From the OFFICIAL ORIGINAL AUTHENTICATED CIE website, here:
    http://www.cie.org.uk/docs/recogniti...or%20IGCSE.pdf
    Oo, but that is for IGCSE, not A Levels?
    Oh, you mean the O Level courses? never mind.
    Forget about the A Level for a while, and let's see the PDF:
    CIE US
    A,A* A
    B A-
    C B
    D C+
    E C
    F D+
    G D
    U F (FAIL)
    Alright, now the Numerical Values for the above US alpha grades are as follows (from the same PDF):
    A 4.0
    A- 3.7
    B+ 3.3
    B 3.0
    B- 2.7
    C+ 2.3
    C 2.0
    C- 1.7
    D+ 1.3
    D 1.0
    (This is seems to be the standard US values, I have found them on many webstes, here forexample:
    http://www.ncu.edu.tw/~joshua/gpa_charts.htm)
    Therefore we have:
    CIE Numerical US
    A* 4.0
    A 4.0
    B 3.7
    C 3.0
    D 2.3
    E 2.0
    F 1.3
    G 1.0 (Least possible passing US Numerical Grade, I guess)
    Alright till now?
    Now what is so special about AP (which are the equivalent to A Level) courses when calculating the GPA?
    Let's take the "OAK PARK HIGH SCHOOL" for example, how do they add A Level courses to the GPA?
    Here:
    http://www.ophs.opusd.k12.ca.us/gpa_&_class_rank.htm
    If you don't want to open the link:

    Got it everybody?

    THAT SIMPLY, MEANS THAT EVERY AP COURSE (EQUIVALENT TO A LEVEL COURSE) RECEIVES 1 EXTRA POINT!!!

    For example, If I got A in an A-Level Mathematics, that would have the Numerical value of 5 (the O Level numerical value of A=4, add 1 extra point, 4+1=5), Got it?

    Another Example:
    I studied (for real) 8 O Level subjects, my Grades were as follows:
    Mathematics A*
    Chemistry A
    Accounting A
    Physics B
    Biology B
    IT B
    Arabic C
    English C
    That would be a GPA of (4+4+4+3.7+3.7+3.7+3.0+3.0)/8=3.64
    (That wat of calculation is from the above CIE pdf file, nothing I came by if from myself)
    Then I studied 2 A Level Subjects:
    Mathematics B
    Chemistry C
    They would have the numerical values of 3.7+3.0 respectively, plus 1 Extra Point for each of them, that would be 4.7+4.0 respectively.
    Then we calculate the GPA:
    (4+4+4+3.7+3.7+3.7+3.0+3.0+4.7+4)/10=3.78

    GOT IT everyone?

    (No wonder my IQ is 144, that's 2 points less than the US president)
    first of all thanks for this thread its really helpful as i wish to be going to a law school in america someday.

    But correct me if I'm mistaken but my a level predictions are BBC i know there not the best I'm currently raising them to A's.

    But with BBC would my gpa work out as the following;
    3.7+1=4.7
    3.7+1=4.7
    3+1=4

    13.4/3 = 4.46? if this is the case is this a good gpa?
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    first of all thanks for this thread its really helpful as i wish to be going to a law school in america someday.

    But correct me if I'm mistaken but my a level predictions are BBC i know there not the best I'm currently raising them to A's.

    But with BBC would my gpa work out as the following;
    3.7+1=4.7
    3.7+1=4.7
    3+1=4

    13.4/3 = 4.46? if this is the case is this a good gpa?
    Well, you didn't add the O Level courses you studied, did u?
    Anyway, Yes, definitly 4.46 is a good GPA!
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    (Original post by Mahran)
    Well, you didn't add the O Level courses you studied, did u?
    Anyway, Yes, definitly 4.46 is a good GPA!
    No my GCSE gpa is like 3.4 thats bad though and it will bring it down won't it? and i thought that the A level and GCSE GPA's had to remain separate as they are different types of qualifications.

    I think my GCSE GPA is 3.4. but i'm not 100% right my results were

    A,A,B,B,C,C,C,C
    ?
    Thanks for answering my question btw
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    No my GCSE gpa is like 3.4 thats bad though and it will bring it down won't it? and i thought that the A level and GCSE GPA's had to remain separate as they are different types of qualifications.
    Yes, you are right, but the problem is that, in the US High Schools, they equate the A-Level Courses with the AP courses, they don't calculate a different GPA for the AP courses, they just add them to the regular courses.
    So, you convert the O Level grades into the equivalent American ones, and then you add the A- Level ones to them too (after you add the extra points for them to).
    They might be two different qualifications, but for USA, AP are studied during the high school.

    Therefore for the GCSE grades of:
    A, A, B, B, C, C, C, C
    you would have the equivalent US grades of:
    A, A, A-, A-, B, B, B, B
    with the Numerical points of:
    4, 4, 3.7, 3.7, 3, 3, 3, 3
    and therefore a GPA of:
    (4+4+3.7+3.7+3+3+3+3)/8=3.425
    Then you studied BBC A-Levels, they would have the Numerical values of:
    B: 3.7+1=4.7
    B: 3.7+1=4.7
    C: 3+1=4
    Total of 13.4
    Therefore Cumulative High School GPA =
    [13.4+8(3.425)]/11=3.71

    Therefore A-Levels didn't bring it down, on the contrary, they raised it!
    (You can see my example in the first post too!)

    Anyway Good luck with raising them to As, that would definitly be much better.
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    (Original post by Mahran)
    Yes, you are right, but the problem is that, in the US High Schools, they equate the A-Level Courses with the AP courses, they don't calculate a different GPA for the AP courses, they just add them to the regular courses.
    So, you convert the O Level grades into the equivalent American ones, and then you add the A- Level ones to them too (after you add the extra points for them to).
    They might be two different qualifications, but for USA, AP are studied during the high school.

    Therefore for the GCSE grades of:
    A, A, B, B, C, C, C, C
    you would have the equivalent US grades of:
    A, A, A-, A-, B, B, B, B
    with the Numerical points of:
    4, 4, 3.7, 3.7, 3, 3, 3, 3
    and therefore a GPA of:
    (4+4+3.7+3.7+3+3+3+3)/8=3.425
    Then you studied BBC A-Levels, they would have the Numerical values of:
    B: 3.7+1=4.7
    B: 3.7+1=4.7
    C: 3+1=4
    Total of 13.4
    Therefore Cumulative High School GPA =
    [13.4+8(3.425)]/11=3.71

    Therefore A-Levels didn't bring it down, on the contrary, they raised it!
    (You can see my example in the first post too!)

    Anyway Good luck with raising them to As, that would definitly be much better.
    thanks soo much for your help a 3.71 gpa is good right though?
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    Will my GPA be affected at all my homework and the like if I'm in the UK?
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    I calculated my GPA, and it came out to be 3.79/4.

    O Level grades:

    5 As, 3 Bs, 1 C

    (5*4) + 3*3.7 + 3 = 34.1

    AS Level grades:

    A B B C C D

    4.5 + 4.2 + 4.2 + 3.5 + 3.5 + 2.8 = 22.7

    (34.1 + 22.7) / (6 + 9) = 3.79

    First of all, is this a good GPA?

    Secondly, considering the HIGHEST grade possible in O Level is an 'A'. Shouldn't O Level grades be weighted higher?

    As in,

    IGCSE - O Level
    A* = A
    A = B
    B = C
    ...

    Hence converting my GPA to:

    (35.7 + 22.7) / (9 + 6) = 3.89

    ???

    Thanks!
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    Um... this is all really great but I'm not very convinced. A levels are equal to AP ? Why didn't you give us a link that is a little more precise.
    All that first link you gave tells us is that "Exams taken by English, Northern Irish and Welsh students in order to gain entrance to UK university, similar to Advanced Placement (AP) tests"
    Similar to is NOT equivalent to Equal to.
    So unless you have something a bit more evidential than that I will not take this serious.
    Sorry mr. 144 IQ guy :/
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    hello...
    I have D in maths(A), d in General Paper(As) and e in computing(As). I calculated my GPA like you said above. But i got 3.225... is that correct??
    Is that a good GPA?
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    and i have 83% in till my school level which is like 3.9 GPA. so how do i calculate my total GPA???
    Thanks
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    No, that is not correct.

    You CANNOT convert A-level grades to a GPA, as the two systems are so fundamentally different. If you do, you'll be penalised by the university for doing so, as it'll be vastly overstated (as in the above calculation you made).
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    Why would you even want your A levels in GPA? Admissions officers are fine with looking at your raw grades.
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    how can one have a GPA of more than 4 ? isn't 4 the max?
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    No because IGCSEs are considered honors courses and A-levels are considered AP. AP are often out of 5.0.
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    Hello to the confused people.
    I live in Bermuda, which is a British Overseas Territory, but is actually (almost) right next to USA. We are provided opportunity for both education systems.

    AP courses are the US equivalent of a UK A-level.
    The systems are different, and you can argue which may be better than the other, but they are essentially the same thing for each system. SATs and PSATs have nothing at all to do with AP courses, they are entirely separate exams from AP exams.
    You can take an SAT in the UK if you so wish, but really it's a lot of hassle for no reason.

    If you wish to convert your A-levels or AP courses into a precise GPA, I suggest using the percentage based GPA scale.
    I cannot be bothered to find one at the moment, so look it up yourself if you do so care.

    The US will take your raw A-level grades, just as the UK will take raw AP grades.

    A good GPA is conditional; in order to play college football you need at least 3.0, 4.0 and higher is considered very good. The "average" range is from 3.3 to 3.7. For Ivy League colleges, they will probably want a 4.0, but most colleges are more relaxed.

    In most places GPAs are based on your class grades, not your exam grades, so it can be affected by homework. UK Year 10 + 11 are considered part of High School in the US, so you may need to include those grades in your GPA. You may also need to include your AS grades, as the US equivalent is still included in GPAs.

    Some of the calculations above appear to be incorrect. You should be including all GCSEs class grades and AS class grades in your calculations (except for PE, and any mandatory "life skills" class).

    But if you're simply applying to a US university, you can simply send your UK grades. It's probably a lot easier that way.

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Updated: December 22, 2013
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