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Foundation Degree Vs A Levels

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    Hi all,
    I currently only hold GCSE's and am considering returning to full time education. I intend to study for a degree but will need to improve on my current qualifications first.

    If my intention was to study Civil or Structural Engineering what would be preferred by the universities and which would position me best for starting a full time degree - a Foundation Degree or A Levels?
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    I was under the impression that Foundation degrees required at least one A level of a decent standard to be accepted onto the course.
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    But as a mature student (29) and a part qualified accountant would that still be the case?
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    (Original post by Lsmiles)
    But as a mature student (29) and a part qualified accountant would that still be the case?
    You'll need to contact the universities, some of them don't even accept foundation degrees.
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    (Original post by Lsmiles)
    Hi all,
    I currently only hold GCSE's and am considering returning to full time education. I intend to study for a degree but will need to improve on my current qualifications first.

    If my intention was to study Civil or Structural Engineering what would be preferred by the universities and which would position me best for starting a full time degree - a Foundation Degree or A Levels?
    Do the A Levels, if you do a foundation degree funding will become an issue (if you don't, you'll be able to get a loan every year of your full degree)
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    I'd do the A-Levels if I were you.
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    (Original post by Lsmiles)
    Hi all,
    I currently only hold GCSE's and am considering returning to full time education. I intend to study for a degree but will need to improve on my current qualifications first.

    If my intention was to study Civil or Structural Engineering what would be preferred by the universities and which would position me best for starting a full time degree - a Foundation Degree or A Levels?
    I think it depends on if you've made your mind up about which course and uni you want to progress to. The foundation courses are set up specifically for that uni and they will expect you to progress to their degree after it. I'm on a foundation year at the moment (durham) and I've found it great as it gets you used to the area and uni and gives you a chance to meet people etc before you start the degree. Also I've found it is tailor made to their degree so you only do the bits that are relevant for next year. The funding side hasn't been an issue to be honest, its one year of funding out of four (and if you do an industrial placement year you'll usually get paid for it). In fact this was one reason I chose a foundation year over an access course as I wouln't have to work as well. Different foundation year's have different entry requirements though, I'm a mature student and got on mine with pretty much nothing but I know some ask for one A level. Hope this helps
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    (Original post by Supersharpshooter)
    I think it depends on if you've made your mind up about which course and uni you want to progress to. The foundation courses are set up specifically for that uni and they will expect you to progress to their degree after it. I'm on a foundation year at the moment (durham) and I've found it great as it gets you used to the area and uni and gives you a chance to meet people etc before you start the degree. Also I've found it is tailor made to their degree so you only do the bits that are relevant for next year. The funding side hasn't been an issue to be honest, its one year of funding out of four (and if you do an industrial placement year you'll usually get paid for it). In fact this was one reason I chose a foundation year over an access course as I wouln't have to work as well. Different foundation year's have different entry requirements though, I'm a mature student and got on mine with pretty much nothing but I know some ask for one A level. Hope this helps
    You're talking about a degree with a foundation year.

    That is not the same as a foundation degree (which is a two year qualification at a uni or college which you can then top up to an honours degree with an extra year if you want).

    However, it's not clear which the OP means...OP, it would help if you would be clear about what you were talking about. Do you mean doing a foundation degree (FdA/FdSc/FdEng), or a degree with an integrated foundation year?
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    (Original post by heidigirl)
    You're talking about a degree with a foundation year.

    That is not the same as a foundation degree (which is a two year qualification at a uni or college which you can then top up to an honours degree with an extra year if you want).

    However, it's not clear which the OP means...OP, it would help if you would be clear about what you were talking about. Do you mean doing a foundation degree (FdA/FdSc/FdEng), or a degree with an integrated foundation year?
    Sounds like he means a foundation year to me....

    Would you do a foundation degree then go to uni?
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    you can do A levels at ICS : http://www.icslearn.co.uk/distance-l...qualification/ : its home learning, you don't have to rub shoulders with 16 year olds.
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    (Original post by Lsmiles)
    Hi all,
    I currently only hold GCSE's and am considering returning to full time education. I intend to study for a degree but will need to improve on my current qualifications first.

    If my intention was to study Civil or Structural Engineering what would be preferred by the universities and which would position me best for starting a full time degree - a Foundation Degree or A Levels?
    If I were in your position I would first look at a degree with a foundation year. So you would normally study four years at university and end up with the same qualification as students doing a 3 year degree.

    The extra year, or Year 0, would bring you up to the equivelant of A level standard in subjects directly related to the degree. You then go into year 1 of the normal degree.

    Finance is available for all four years, assuming you have no previous study at university.

    Entry requirements will vary between univeristies of course, but they all seem to be flexible. Contact the admissions tutor for the course that interests you rather than going through UCAS at first.

    If you can find somewhere that will accept you, you could be at university this year with finance rather than having to spend a year or two studying A levels.

    Well, that's what I am doing in October anyway :cool:
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    (Original post by Lsmiles)
    Hi all,
    I currently only hold GCSE's and am considering returning to full time education. I intend to study for a degree but will need to improve on my current qualifications first.

    If my intention was to study Civil or Structural Engineering what would be preferred by the universities and which would position me best for starting a full time degree - a Foundation Degree or A Levels?
    Consider neither and contact all your local colleges about 'Access' Courses. They'll much better than the other two and will give you the appropriate help and support you need to get back into the swing of things again. Every uni recognises them as well....
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    I would suggest A-Levels. I applied to LSE for BSc (Government & Economics ) in 2008 , with my Access to Business studies. They asked me to take their entry test, which they would have not if I had A-Levels. Anyways got rejected by the end of March. Upon query they told me that my marks were not the highest. Try Ealing College or Westminster Kingsway College. Both of them offer A-Levels for adults.

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Updated: March 23, 2010
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