Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey there Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Disabled Students Allowance - will I get it?

Announcements Posted on
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I have just applied for the DSA and I was wondering whether I will receive it as I have diabetes? If so does anyone know how much I might be entitled to if so?

    Thanks
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Depends really if you have to spend any money I guess. I have a metabolic condition and I applied and they wouldn't give me it - but all my stuff was on prescription. (Now you've reminded me, I'm tempted to reapply since my prescriptions are no longer free).
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I reckon you probably would but I can't be 100%! My brother has crohnes disease and he got it - free laptop, loads of books, accommodation help, a free medication card for the year - loads of stuff! I don't know the exact details but I imagine you would get it xxx
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Wesssty)
    How many mars bars you want?
    I love you for thinking the same as me, but hate you for beating me to it.

    Seriously though, I understand students have certain disabilites that need allowances for certain things, but OP, what does diabetes do that you would need an allowance for?
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Why does diabetes mean that you need extra help with studying?
    • 76 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Does diabetes mean you have any study related costs that students without it would have? You can't include prescriptions, but you'll get those free anyway.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Juno)
    Does diabetes mean you have any study related costs that students without it would have? You can't include prescriptions, but you'll get those free anyway.
    Damn. Prescriptions not included even when you have to pay bloody £120 a year or whatever for a pass? Grr.
    • 9 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thatwhichiam)
    Depends really if you have to spend any money I guess. I have a metabolic condition and I applied and they wouldn't give me it - but all my stuff was on prescription. (Now you've reminded me, I'm tempted to reapply since my prescriptions are no longer free).
    If that's because you got too old for free prescriptions; then do you know about HC1 form to get free prescriptions if you are on a low income? (As most students are)

    If not then ignore me lol.
    • 18 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by A-W-H)
    Seriously though, I understand students have certain disabilites that need allowances for certain things, but OP, what does diabetes do that you would need an allowance for?
    Depends on what impact it has on their studies and academic life but, especially if it isn't particularly well controlled (with can result in things like fatigue), I can see why someone with diabetes might need certain things like a voice recorder (to record lectures) or a book allowance.

    (Original post by jellybelly92)
    I have just applied for the DSA and I was wondering whether I will receive it as I have diabetes? If so does anyone know how much I might be entitled to if so?
    You don't get an actual allowance or amount of money as such, it's not a grant in that sense.

    You have a needs assessment and, during this needs assessment, your academic needs are highlighted. You are able to discuss problems you think you'll have with an advisor and they'll produce a report recommending support (things you can claim through DSA). The money from the DSA itself is usually paid directly to the university, supplier or organisation involved in providing the support although there are exceptions.

    There are three components of DSA

    Specialist equipment (up to 5k for the duration of the course)
    Non-medical helper allowance (up to 20.5k a year)
    General allowance (£1,724 a year)

    The specialist equipment can include things like a computer and apporpriate software, a voice recorder (to record lectures), a PDA or anything else that might be relevant and essential to your study.

    Non-medical helper (things like someone to carry equipment or books, an assistant to help with labwork or in the library, study skills sessions and a mentor)

    General allowance (non-essential books, photocopying, Internet costs or, if you face additional costs as a result of your disability, travel costs).

    How much you get really depends on the extent to which your study is affected by your condition. The amounts stated above are maximum amounts, and it's rare for any student to even get close to those amounts (those who do will have complex needs and/or mulitple disabilities).
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    i stubbed my toe the other week, thinking of applying for DSA for next year of uni.
    • 18 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RightSaidJames)
    Diabetes is hardly a disability, it's just a condition that requires you to schedule your meals, stab yourself 4 times a day and regularly prick your fingers. I don't see how DSA would be of any benefit to your studying.
    (Original post by morecambebay)
    Why does diabetes mean that you need extra help with studying?

    Diabetes meets the definition of a disability under the Disability Discrimination Act (1995), the "official" means of determining whether something is a disability or not.

    Whether someone with diabetes thinks they have a disability is another matter. But the same can be said for a number of things like autism, dyslexia, epilepsy or dyspraxia.

    Disabled Student Allowances are to cover additional study related costs as a result of disability or chronic medical conditions. So even if it's not accepted as a disability (which officially it is) then it's certainly a chronic medical condition.

    Read the literature on disabled students allowance or the information on individual university websites and ALL will state that diabetes is a disability and someone with diabetes can apply for DSA if it affects their study.

    If it's well controlled, and doesn't present any problems with regards to study, then it's unlikely the OP will receive much (if any) support. But diabetes isn't always well controlled and, depending on the person, can have a direct effect on their study.

    But it's still worth informing the university of the situation (so they can provide a fridge in halls if necessary) and, if the student does feel unwell/their condition worsens, can be more understanding when it comes to occasional absence.

    So it's worth the OP having a needs assessment, it's just no one can say how much she'll get (if anything) because it's such an individual thing.
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by A-W-H)

    Seriously though, I understand students have certain disabilites that need allowances for certain things, but OP, what does diabetes do that you would need an allowance for?
    Yeah that's what I wonder lol but seeing as it is counted as a disability I thought i'd apply just to see...
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    And the woman who suggested it to me was on about having a mini fridge for insulin and stuff...so maybe that's where the money will go if I am entitled. But I understand everyone's points, diabetes isn't that big a deal and the only thing I would necessarily need is some extra change if my sugar level was low and I didn't have anything on me.. and I don't think that's a good enough reason really!
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    My friend has been diagnosed with MS could she apply for disabled student allowence?
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kpwxx)
    If that's because you got too old for free prescriptions; then do you know about HC1 form to get free prescriptions if you are on a low income? (As most students are)

    If not then ignore me lol.
    I honestly never thought of myself as being on a low income so I just ignored that part of the form.

    *investigates*

    Thank you!
    • 9 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thatwhichiam)
    I honestly never thought of myself as being on a low income so I just ignored that part of the form.

    *investigates*

    Thank you!
    Yeah I had some horrid woman on the phone shout at me about being a student not meaning you get it. But I did, and that was with my loans/grants/bursary and a little help from my parents. Just have to have the perseverance to fill in that horrid form. I mainly use it for free dentist check-ups, they charge a bomb for those!
    • 6 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    You'll get a fridge, most likely. Can't see anything else that you would need for university due to your disability.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    You do understand DSA is like an expenses claim, not just a set amount of money to do what you like with?
    Sorry but you give the impression that it doesn't impact your studies and your just milking a medical condition... If you discuss it with your unis disability advisor and they think you can apply for things then fair enough, bit they're pretty good at telling if a person really needs support or just wants some free stuff.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ILoveOrangeJuice)
    My friend has been diagnosed with MS could she apply for disabled student allowence?
    Yes she can, if MS means she has study related costs.
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Shuvel)
    You do understand DSA is like an expenses claim, not just a set amount of money to do what you like with?
    Sorry but you give the impression that it doesn't impact your studies and your just milking a medical condition... If you discuss it with your unis disability advisor and they think you can apply for things then fair enough, bit they're pretty good at telling if a person really needs support or just wants some free stuff.
    Well no it doesn't really impact my studies, but why is it called a disability then? Just because I control my diabetes doesn't mean I shouldn't be able to have what others have to help them. I have had a major hypo during an exam before, and it affected me so much I had to leave the exam as I couldn't concentrate. What if this happens often during lectures and I miss out on vital notes? So really it's up to them but because I've heard nothing from a 'disability advisor' apart from when I went and asked, I'm quite unsure of what to do.
Updated: May 20, 2012
New on TSR

Find out what year 11 is like

Going into year 11? Students who did it last year share what to expect.

Article updates
Reputation gems:
You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.