Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey! Sign in to get help with your study questionsNew here? Join for free to post

Choosing your A levels? Your questions answered here!

Announcements Posted on
    • 15 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Y07jamesp)
    I would like to do Architecture once at university,but i am struggling to choose A-levels that the course needs. At the moment I am thinking of taking-
    - Maths
    - Further Maths
    - Chemistry
    - Biology
    - Physics
    Then i will drop either biology or physics in A2. Will it matter that i am not taking an art based subject?
    I'm doing art GCSE anyway, but even though i work at a solid A/ A* grade i don't think i will get as good of a grade if i do this rather than a science or math subject.
    Help :s
    It depends where you want to apply eg. Sheffield, Manchester Liverpool, UCL, Cambridge all want a portfolio. GCSE art work will NOT stand out compared to A-level art/art foundation applicants, if you compare my GCSE to A-level it looks awful, I didn't put any in for my Sheffield portfolio.

    Choose subjects you enjoy though, and then decide on universities you can apply to afterwards as your subjects will probably inevitably lead you to the right course anyway. Architecture can be a really flexible subject for allowing you to do the A-levels you enjoy, I am doing Art, Geography, Biology (and general studies) and Chemistry AS.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Hello
    I am from Greece and i would like to ask you how i can apply for the A-levels exam in June.
    thank you!
    • 62 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    A-Levels for Maths and Philosophy?
    • 12 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    A-Levels for Maths and Philosophy?
    Try Maths and Philosphy A-Levels and then pick what other one's you want. Maybe Further Maths. Jheez some people.
    • 3 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    A-Levels for Maths and Philosophy?
    for lse you only need maths
    http://www2.lse.ac.uk/study/undergra...ficMethod.aspx

    same with oxford

    http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/under...ics_and_2.html

    i don't think any maths and philosophy courses requires philosophy at a level but there might be a few.
    • 62 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by non)
    for lse you only need maths
    http://www2.lse.ac.uk/study/undergra...ficMethod.aspx

    same with oxford

    http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/under...ics_and_2.html

    i don't think any maths and philosophy courses requires philosophy at a level but there might be a few.
    I'm looking at what the best A-Levels to take for the course would be?Oxford will obviously prefer some over others because of the course.Does Maths,Further Maths,Geography and RE sound right?I can't take Philosophy and I have been told that English Lit could be very useful but I'm not that good at it-I expect to get a high A* in Maths,Geography and RE and only a high A in English Lit.
    • 3 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    I'm looking at what the best A-Levels to take for the course would be?Oxford will obviously prefer some over others because of the course.Does Maths,Further Maths,Geography and RE sound right?I can't take Philosophy and I have been told that English Lit could be very useful but I'm not that good at it-I expect to get a high A* in Maths,Geography and RE and only a high A in English Lit.
    Yes those subjects are good.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Hi

    I am currently down to take maths, physics, chemistry and french for AS next year however i am not 100% sure on my choices. I am pretty certain on maths and physics but i am also interested in economics and am considering doing that instead of chemistry or french, probably french. I am likely to get an A* in french but im still not sure whether i would be able to get one of the top grades at AS and i also think there would be opportunities to do languages outside of school at other points in my life? I'm not really sure i want to take either chemistry or french to A2

    If i did choose to swap french for economics i would be left with maths, physics, chemistry and econmics. Have i narrowed down too much? there would appear to be a lack of variety in those 4? and is it really 'always good to have to a language' as i so often hear? and is, for example, a C grade at AS in a language considered ok?

    If i stick with my current choices i am planning to drop french (or maybe chemistry) at the end of year 12 and take up economics. This seems a sensible option as i have never studied economics before - it doesn't matter if i delay studying for a year. Whereas if i take maths, physics, chemistry and economics i am stuck for something to pick up in year 13 because i would presumably be unable to go back to french after a year out of studying

    i appreciate your advice and sorry for the long post and many questions, i hope i was clear enough

    thanks
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ThePepperRobot)
    Hi

    I am currently down to take maths, physics, chemistry and french for AS next year however i am not 100% sure on my choices. I am pretty certain on maths and physics but i am also interested in economics and am considering doing that instead of chemistry or french, probably french. I am likely to get an A* in french but im still not sure whether i would be able to get one of the top grades at AS and i also think there would be opportunities to do languages outside of school at other points in my life? I'm not really sure i want to take either chemistry or french to A2

    If i did choose to swap french for economics i would be left with maths, physics, chemistry and econmics. Have i narrowed down too much? there would appear to be a lack of variety in those 4? and is it really 'always good to have to a language' as i so often hear? and is, for example, a C grade at AS in a language considered ok?

    If i stick with my current choices i am planning to drop french (or maybe chemistry) at the end of year 12 and take up economics. This seems a sensible option as i have never studied economics before - it doesn't matter if i delay studying for a year. Whereas if i take maths, physics, chemistry and economics i am stuck for something to pick up in year 13 because i would presumably be unable to go back to french after a year out of studying

    i appreciate your advice and sorry for the long post and many questions, i hope i was clear enough

    thanks
    Yes there are outside opportunities to do languages but it can be expensive, even at university. At my university first years can do an evening class for free. I do think it's "always good to have a language" because it means you can study or work abroad, whatever your field, or just travel. On top of that, if you have French A level then when you get to uni you can push that standard up even higher and get really good at the language - which is life changing really. I wouldn't want you to miss the opportunity

    It's good that you're thinking about picking things up in year 13 and it's true that French would be particularly difficult, though not impossible, to get back into after a year. I had a similar problem with maths You need to remember though, that you can't predict now how you'll feel at the end of year 13. You may find that one of your subjects is unexpectedly boring or difficult - that's why it's essential you take four subjects.

    I think you need to decide which four interest you the most (taking into account what I said about French ) and pick the best four. Don't put off a subject you're really interested in until year 13 because by then it's too late to get the A2 and do it at uni.

    Do you have any idea about whether you want to go to uni and if so what might you study?
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Clumsy_Chemist)
    Yes there are outside opportunities to do languages but it can be expensive, even at university. At my university first years can do an evening class for free. I do think it's "always good to have a language" because it means you can study or work abroad, whatever your field, or just travel. On top of that, if you have French A level then when you get to uni you can push that standard up even higher and get really good at the language - which is life changing really. I wouldn't want you to miss the opportunity

    It's good that you're thinking about picking things up in year 13 and it's true that French would be particularly difficult, though not impossible, to get back into after a year. I had a similar problem with maths You need to remember though, that you can't predict now how you'll feel at the end of year 13. You may find that one of your subjects is unexpectedly boring or difficult - that's why it's essential you take four subjects.

    I think you need to decide which four interest you the most (taking into account what I said about French ) and pick the best four. Don't put off a subject you're really interested in until year 13 because by then it's too late to get the A2 and do it at uni.

    Do you have any idea about whether you want to go to uni and if so what might you study?
    Even if i do take french just at AS will that be considered ok by universities? If i was choosing subjects that i enjoyed i would probably pick economics over both french and chemistry. I sort of feel like i am only choosing french so that i have more variety in my subjects and im not really confident that i could get a worthwhile grade, even though im doing well at gcse, so i may swap it for economics.

    On the other hand, if i swapped economics for chemistry i would be left doing only 1 science - would this put me at a disadvantage when applying for university? I am hoping to do something reasonably academic although im not sure what or sure about my career path. I have been considering something science based but im also interested in perhaps doing something to do with banking or finance. I have also read that you dont necessarily have to do economics at A level to do it at university?

    Thanks for your advice, i appreciate it
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Hi, I have already chosen my subjects, but it is easy enough to change them, they'll just be a bit cross.

    I've picked English Lit, Chemistry, ICT and Biology in that order with French as my 5th.

    But we've just started theory work again in ICT and I have never been as bored as I am in that double, seriously it's terrible. We were given a past paper to do over the Easter break I only got round to it today because I was avoiding ICT and its just horrible. I know all of the answers but I just really can't be bothered writing a 12 mark answer for the advantages of touch screens.
    I've never really liked ICT, but I've only come to realise how very very boring and useless it is. The thing is, that I've never done a scrap of revision for ICT, and I barely listen, but I'm still the best in the year and I have an A* in coursework so even if I didn't answer the twelvemarker purely out of lazyness I will probably get an A.

    Basically, should I do ICT because I'm naturally good at it (It runs in my family, my sister came best in n.Ireland when she did her a-levels) or French because its actually useful and that class has never (so far) made me want to lay down and have a snooze.

    If it helps I'm predicted a high A to an A* in French aswell, but I really do have to work in that class.
    • 6 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ThePepperRobot)
    Hi

    I am currently down to take maths, physics, chemistry and french for AS next year however i am not 100% sure on my choices. I am pretty certain on maths and physics but i am also interested in economics and am considering doing that instead of chemistry or french, probably french. I am likely to get an A* in french but im still not sure whether i would be able to get one of the top grades at AS and i also think there would be opportunities to do languages outside of school at other points in my life? I'm not really sure i want to take either chemistry or french to A2...
    French at A-level isn't as difficult as it appears; it's building upon your KS3 and GCSE knowledge of the language so it's not a massively scary step up; if you're on for an A* at GCSE, with a bit of work you should be able to do well! Having a language would be beneficial and would offer a non-science subject, but only take it if you would have the interest to do it and put the work in; you do have a good selection of subjects anyway. A-level French is brilliant and the topics are much more interesting than those at GCSE
    I think it's best if you take 4 that you'd like to take to A2 and not think about dropping them before you've started; you may be surprised at what/if you want to drop next year after starting your A-levels.
    Hope that helps
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ThePepperRobot)
    Even if i do take french just at AS will that be considered ok by universities? If i was choosing subjects that i enjoyed i would probably pick economics over both french and chemistry. I sort of feel like i am only choosing french so that i have more variety in my subjects and im not really confident that i could get a worthwhile grade, even though im doing well at gcse, so i may swap it for economics.

    On the other hand, if i swapped economics for chemistry i would be left doing only 1 science - would this put me at a disadvantage when applying for university? I am hoping to do something reasonably academic although im not sure what or sure about my career path. I have been considering something science based but im also interested in perhaps doing something to do with banking or finance. I have also read that you dont necessarily have to do economics at A level to do it at university?

    Thanks for your advice, i appreciate it
    You don't have to do economics A level to do it at uni but you can't know if you want to dedicate three years of your life to it without trying it first.

    Having just physics and maths is fine for most engineering, physics, maths and electronics courses but chemistry would let you do chemistry, biochemistry, chemical engineering, medicine and some other things. So you would be limiting yourself without it, but a scientific career is by no means ruled out, just limited.

    I'm not sure what you mean about French AS being acceptable - acceptable for what? It's not going to be enough to study French at uni but in terms of doing extra language classes there will be levels suitable for everyone regardless of level. I wouldn't worry too much about grades, it's hard to predict what A level will be like and it sounds like you have every chance of success.

    It sounds like economics interests you and it's relevant to the sort of career you're interested in so do and decide which of the other two you want, both will open doors. What's more appealling? Broadening the range of science you can do or adding a language to your CV?

    (Original post by wontdeny)
    Hi, I have already chosen my subjects, but it is easy enough to change them, they'll just be a bit cross.

    I've picked English Lit, Chemistry, ICT and Biology in that order with French as my 5th.

    But we've just started theory work again in ICT and I have never been as bored as I am in that double, seriously it's terrible. We were given a past paper to do over the Easter break I only got round to it today because I was avoiding ICT and its just horrible. I know all of the answers but I just really can't be bothered writing a 12 mark answer for the advantages of touch screens.
    I've never really liked ICT, but I've only come to realise how very very boring and useless it is. The thing is, that I've never done a scrap of revision for ICT, and I barely listen, but I'm still the best in the year and I have an A* in coursework so even if I didn't answer the twelvemarker purely out of lazyness I will probably get an A.

    Basically, should I do ICT because I'm naturally good at it (It runs in my family, my sister came best in n.Ireland when she did her a-levels) or French because its actually useful and that class has never (so far) made me want to lay down and have a snooze.

    If it helps I'm predicted a high A to an A* in French aswell, but I really do have to work in that class.
    Do you mean French is your 5th AS or your backup subject? I strongly advise you to do French instead of ICT. Do not study an easy subject just because it's easy, it will weaken your CV and university application.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kayleigh.jean)
    French at A-level isn't as difficult as it appears; it's building upon your KS3 and GCSE knowledge of the language so it's not a massively scary step up; if you're on for an A* at GCSE, with a bit of work you should be able to do well! Having a language would be beneficial and would offer a non-science subject, but only take it if you would have the interest to do it and put the work in; you do have a good selection of subjects anyway. A-level French is brilliant and the topics are much more interesting than those at GCSE
    I think it's best if you take 4 that you'd like to take to A2 and not think about dropping them before you've started; you may be surprised at what/if you want to drop next year after starting your A-levels.
    Hope that helps
    Yes, i see what you mean about thinking about dropping them before i start. I quite enjoy french and i dont think motivation will be a problem, particularly if the topics are interesting. Thanks for your advice
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    What options (as in university courses or careers) does an A-level in Maths unlock, compared to an A-level in Chemistry? Trying to decide between these two as my fourth A-level. I realize Maths will generally be more useful, but I like it a lot less and can fairly easily do it myself in a gap year (unlike Chemistry) if I need to. Cheers.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Clumsy_Chemist)
    You don't have to do economics A level to do it at uni but you can't know if you want to dedicate three years of your life to it without trying it first.

    Having just physics and maths is fine for most engineering, physics, maths and electronics courses but chemistry would let you do chemistry, biochemistry, chemical engineering, medicine and some other things. So you would be limiting yourself without it, but a scientific career is by no means ruled out, just limited.

    I'm not sure what you mean about French AS being acceptable - acceptable for what? It's not going to be enough to study French at uni but in terms of doing extra language classes there will be levels suitable for everyone regardless of level. I wouldn't worry too much about grades, it's hard to predict what A level will be like and it sounds like you have every chance of success.

    It sounds like economics interests you and it's relevant to the sort of career you're interested in so do and decide which of the other two you want, both will open doors. What's more appealling? Broadening the range of science you can do or adding a language to your CV?
    Taking that into account I am considering sticking with my original 4. I would like to keep open the broadest range of degree courses i can, so taking chemistry would help with this. The idea of another language is appealing, and although economics interests me I will probably be able to do the AS in year 13. If i chose to take economics in year 12 i would be stuck for an AS to pick up in year 13. I think these are the 4 that would show the widest range of ability?
    • 6 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by wontdeny)
    Hi, I have already chosen my subjects, but it is easy enough to change them, they'll just be a bit cross.

    I've picked English Lit, Chemistry, ICT and Biology in that order with French as my 5th.

    But we've just started theory work again in ICT and I have never been as bored as I am in that double, seriously it's terrible. We were given a past paper to do over the Easter break I only got round to it today because I was avoiding ICT and its just horrible. I know all of the answers but I just really can't be bothered writing a 12 mark answer for the advantages of touch screens.
    I've never really liked ICT, but I've only come to realise how very very boring and useless it is. The thing is, that I've never done a scrap of revision for ICT, and I barely listen, but I'm still the best in the year and I have an A* in coursework so even if I didn't answer the twelvemarker purely out of lazyness I will probably get an A.

    Basically, should I do ICT because I'm naturally good at it (It runs in my family, my sister came best in n.Ireland when she did her a-levels) or French because its actually useful and that class has never (so far) made me want to lay down and have a snooze.

    If it helps I'm predicted a high A to an A* in French aswell, but I really do have to work in that class.
    You should choose which one you think you'll enjoy more and get the most benefit from for you.
    I've replied to someone else a few posts earlier here regarding French A-level - I really do recommend it. If French GCSE hasn't bored you then I seriously doubt A-level will!
    With regards to ICT, I don't take it, but one of my friends does and from what he's said A-level is really a step up from GCSE which he found incredibly easy (got one of the highest marks ever at our school). The demand of the work seems a lot higher and being naturally good at it doesn't mean you won't have to work very hard.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dan673)
    What options (as in university courses or careers) does an A-level in Maths unlock, compared to an A-level in Chemistry? Trying to decide between these two as my fourth A-level. I realize Maths will generally be more useful, but I like it a lot less and can fairly easily do it myself in a gap year (unlike Chemistry) if I need to. Cheers.
    Maths is needed for physics, finance and science in general including chemistry. Chemistry helps with biology, physics and geography. My advice is to do chemistry unless you have plans that specifically require maths because at A level it's important to do subjects you like to have a chance of doing well.
    (Original post by ThePepperRobot)
    Taking that into account I am considering sticking with my original 4. I would like to keep open the broadest range of degree courses i can, so taking chemistry would help with this. The idea of another language is appealing, and although economics interests me I will probably be able to do the AS in year 13. If i chose to take economics in year 12 i would be stuck for an AS to pick up in year 13. I think these are the 4 that would show the widest range of ability?
    Economics instead of chemistry would let you show you a broader range of ability because it's a social science and quite essay based. Chemistry doesn't offer much beyond what physics offers in terms of skills, but whichever you choose they're good subjects.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Clumsy_Chemist)
    Economics instead of chemistry would let you show you a broader range of ability because it's a social science and quite essay based. Chemistry doesn't offer much beyond what physics offers in terms of skills, but whichever you choose they're good subjects.
    But if i stick with these 4 then do economics in year 13 at AS i will have done all 5, to at least AS, and have an essay based subject as well?
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ThePepperRobot)
    But if i stick with these 4 then do economics in year 13 at AS i will have done all 5, to at least AS, and have an essay based subject as well?
    But the advantage of doing it in year 12 is that then you'll have a grade for it on your UCAS application instead of just a predicted grade.

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: November 26, 2014
New on TSR

Exclusive Nick Clegg interview

Your questions answered by the deputy prime minister

Article updates
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.