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Graduate training scheme after an MSc

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Got a question about Student Finance? Ask the experts this week on TSR! 14-09-2014
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    Hi folks,

    I'm starting an MSc in September which'll run through until the following January (16 months), with graduation in July 2012. I'm going straight from my undergrad which I finished last month.

    By the end of the MSc, I'll be 25 years old and it'll be two full years since I completed my undergrad.

    Am I right in thinking that I'm screwed in terms of graduate training schemes after I finish my MSc? I reckon that

    • I'll be considered too old
    • There'll be lots of young (aged 21-22) whippersnappers coming out of their undergrads and fighting for the places
    • The recruiters will look at an MSc and wonder why I did it
    • Even if I do get in, I'll feel out of place


    Are my fears founded or not? I'm looking to the future and need to decide whether a scheme like this is for me. Fact is, I don't have too much work experience (I've got a few summer admin jobs and a three month software engineering internship under my belt) so I really do worry about getting a conventional job at age 25 with this little experience. I'm fully intending on getting an internship or job next summer as I missed the boat this year. I also have plenty of bits of relevant extra-curricular dabbling and background knowledge which can go on my CV.

    Or, maybe, would the MSc be considered advantageous when applying for such a scheme?

    The reason I'm concerned and confused is that I can't find any examples of people who have done what I'm wondering about - most go straight in from undergraduate degrees and that's them sorted.

    Thanks in advance for your help, much appreciated.
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    My mate recently went into a graduate training scheme after finishing an MSc, a PhD and a postdoc! 25 is not old at all and depending on what type of industry you are going into being a bit older can be considered advantageous.
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    What industry do you want to go into?

    -You probably won't be too old - people start grad schemes quite late - and you'd be suprised how many people go onto postgrad study.

    -Age won't make a difference when it comes to making the decision - either your eligible for the job or not.

    -Be prepared to answer questions on why you did the MSc

    -That depends on your social skills! Again, wouldnt be surprised if you weren't the only person your age. Plus there are more than just grads in the office!
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    I'm doing the same, i can't see why it would be a hinderance. Surely an Msc would be considered better!
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    (Original post by ch0llima)
    Hi folks,

    I'm starting an MSc in September which'll run through until the following January (16 months), with graduation in July 2012. I'm going straight from my undergrad which I finished last month.

    By the end of the MSc, I'll be 25 years old and it'll be two full years since I completed my undergrad.

    Am I right in thinking that I'm screwed in terms of graduate training schemes after I finish my MSc? I reckon that

    • I'll be considered too old
    • There'll be lots of young (aged 21-22) whippersnappers coming out of their undergrads and fighting for the places
    • The recruiters will look at an MSc and wonder why I did it
    • Even if I do get in, I'll feel out of place


    Are my fears founded or not? I'm looking to the future and need to decide whether a scheme like this is for me. Fact is, I don't have too much work experience (I've got a few summer admin jobs and a three month software engineering internship under my belt) so I really do worry about getting a conventional job at age 25 with this little experience. I'm fully intending on getting an internship or job next summer as I missed the boat this year. I also have plenty of bits of relevant extra-curricular dabbling and background knowledge which can go on my CV.

    Or, maybe, would the MSc be considered advantageous when applying for such a scheme?

    The reason I'm concerned and confused is that I can't find any examples of people who have done what I'm wondering about - most go straight in from undergraduate degrees and that's them sorted.

    Thanks in advance for your help, much appreciated.
    I have similar worries because if I decide not to go into education (further or higher) then most employers will wonder what I have done with myself for the last x amount of years; you cannot even get a job in Waterstones these days without previous retail experience...
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    (Original post by ch0llima)
    Hi folks,

    I'm starting an MSc in September which'll run through until the following January (16 months), with graduation in July 2012. I'm going straight from my undergrad which I finished last month.

    By the end of the MSc, I'll be 25 years old and it'll be two full years since I completed my undergrad.

    Am I right in thinking that I'm screwed in terms of graduate training schemes after I finish my MSc? I reckon that

    • I'll be considered too old
    • There'll be lots of young (aged 21-22) whippersnappers coming out of their undergrads and fighting for the places
    • The recruiters will look at an MSc and wonder why I did it
    • Even if I do get in, I'll feel out of place


    Are my fears founded or not? I'm looking to the future and need to decide whether a scheme like this is for me. Fact is, I don't have too much work experience (I've got a few summer admin jobs and a three month software engineering internship under my belt) so I really do worry about getting a conventional job at age 25 with this little experience. I'm fully intending on getting an internship or job next summer as I missed the boat this year. I also have plenty of bits of relevant extra-curricular dabbling and background knowledge which can go on my CV.

    Or, maybe, would the MSc be considered advantageous when applying for such a scheme?

    The reason I'm concerned and confused is that I can't find any examples of people who have done what I'm wondering about - most go straight in from undergraduate degrees and that's them sorted.

    Thanks in advance for your help, much appreciated.
    Graduate schemes will generally not take into the account of your age (age discrimination law etc). I can think of a couple of people who were in their mid-30s when they started their graduate scheme.

    Graduate schemes like mature applicants in general as they have work experience already and can offer relatively cheap labour for the company given their experience. However, there are some schemes who may have reservations about mature applicants as they want fresh graduates to be malleable, shaped and moulded to the company's ideal (i.e. older applicants are moulded/shaped by their previous work experience already).

    However, the OP has stated they have little experience, which in this case, they'll be treated like any other fresh graduates who are 21/22 when applying.

    An MSc is only advantageous if it's an entry requirement for the particular graduate scheme or they have explicitly said they prefer postgraduates. Otherwise, it makes no difference and one will be treated more or less equally with applicants with bachelors only.
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    (Original post by seel)
    An MSc is only advantageous if it's an entry requirement for the particular graduate scheme or they have explicitly said they prefer postgraduates. Otherwise, it makes no difference and one will be treated more or less equally with applicants with bachelors only.
    At least, an additional MSc is a costly signal. Having invested in yourself through studying another year signals confidence in your own potential - whether you've learned anything or not (though this is at the very least, most of the time you learn considerably, often even more than in your entire bsc in my experience).

    Then I do not see how a candidate for any job with a MSc degree would not be favored over a BSc candidate. Actually, as a company, I would be worried that those 21/22 yr olds do not perform because they're immature..
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    (Original post by lev nikolaevich)
    At least, an additional MSc is a costly signal. Having invested in yourself through studying another year signals confidence in your own potential - whether you've learned anything or not (though this is at the very least, most of the time you learn considerably, often even more than in your entire bsc in my experience).
    You need to think of it in blue chip employers perspective. You fill in an online app, and the filter is already happening, they need to reduce the number of applicants to the next round. They will filter out the people not meeting the school grades, degree grades, filled the app wrong, spelling mistakes and perhaps pick up buzz words in your answers.

    Off the top of my head, the only signal I can think of a masters may have in this online app system is if the university is one of the employers' target school. Humans reading the applications happen later in the app process, so the aim for grads is to make sure they can get pass the initial filter so it can be read by the recruitment team.

    Whether or not a master signals your own potential - not really unless the masters related or wanted by the job you're applying for. Employers know people are staying longer in education as they cannot get a job so they're not surprised anymore if they receive apps from ppl holding masters.

    Then I do not see how a candidate for any job with a MSc degree would not be favored over a BSc candidate. Actually, as a company, I would be worried that those 21/22 yr olds do not perform because they're immature..
    See my answer in my previous post. Unless the employer stipulate they prefer a masters or say the qual is advantageous, it seriously makes no difference. It's a graduate scheme, as long as one makes the minimum education requirement to get pass the initial filter, it's fair game for all.

    Also, your comment about 21/22 yo are misleading as you are suggesting maturity (in the workplace) is generally related to age. It may be so for say, people in their teens who are still in development. However, young people can be mature and there are plenty of people in their late 20s/30s/40s who have yet to grow up. That's why graduate employers use competency interviews to find the top applicants - people who can give examples that would indicate maturity in their outlook and shows certain capabilities.
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    (Original post by seel)
    there are plenty of people in their late 20s/30s/40s who have yet to grow up.
    :o:

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