Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Do students have to pay for prescriptions?

Announcements Posted on
    • Thread Starter
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    If yes, can they get any discounts? I'm on frequent meds and I really don't want to pay 7.20 every time I get one! I'm a uni student by the way, with no income; just student finance loans. Can I get some sort of discount. How much discount roughly would I be entitled to?
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    i've got a feeling it's only until your 19, not 100% sure though
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pimpman777)
    If yes, can they get any discounts? I'm on frequent meds and I really don't want to pay 7.20 every time I get one! I'm a uni student by the way, with no income; just student finance loans. Can I get some sort of discount. How much discount roughly would I be entitled to?
    Fill in a HC1 form to get a HC2 certificate if you qualify. If not, you can get pre-paid certificates that last 3 or 12 months which will offer you a discount. Check with the NHS that your condition doesn't mean that you get free/reduced costs meds anyway. Diabetes,Addisons, any form of cancer etc are examples of conditions where you can get free medication
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    How old are you? If your 16-18 and in full-time education they are free. After that you have to pay full price unless you hold a HC2 certificate. To get one you need to be assessed using a HC1 form (can get from doctor, chemist, hospital, job center ect.) which takes into account your income and savings.

    If you don't and get regular medication it may be better to pre-pay your prescriptions.

    For the following conditions you get free prescriptions:

    Treatment for cancer; note this includes treatment for the effects of cancer, or treatment for the effects of a current or previous cancer treatment. (Not available for patients in Scotland.)
    A permanent fistula requiring dressing.
    Forms of hypoadrenalism such as Addison's disease.
    Diabetes insipidus and other forms of hypopituitarism.
    Diabetes mellitus except where treatment is by diet alone.
    Hypoparathyroidism.
    Myxoedema (underactive thyroid) or other conditions where thyroid hormone replacement is necessary.
    Myasthenia gravis.
    Epilepsy requiring continuous anti-convulsive medication.
    A continuing physical disability which means you cannot go out without help from another person.

    Your doctor should have informed you if this is the case, but if you've just turned 18 it's worth checking.
    • 91 followers
    Offline

    Go to the post office, fill out a HC1 form and apply for HC2 exemption charges if you have no income!
    Or, next time you have a review, ask your GP to check the drug tariff and see how much the item would be in private prescription. (PM me and I might be able to give you a rough idea whether you can get it cheaper on private prescription or not - I work in a pharmacy as a dispenser and have a recent (but not up to date - July 2010) drug tarrif next to me now)
    • Thread Starter
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Thank you for the replies. I'll see to getting this supposed HC1 form. Roughly how much discount would I be entitled to this way?

    And also, it's not for diabetes or anything like that. I'm 19 btw, on the prescription it says only 16-18s can get free.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    What about 18 in University?
    • 91 followers
    Offline

    (Original post by bestie)
    How old are you? If your 16-18 and in full-time education they are free. After that you have to pay full price unless you hold a HC2 certificate. To get one you need to be assessed using a HC1 form (can get from doctor, chemist, hospital, job center ect.) which takes into account your income and savings.

    If you don't and get regular medication it may be better to pre-pay your prescriptions.

    For the following conditions you get free prescriptions:

    Treatment for cancer; note this includes treatment for the effects of cancer, or treatment for the effects of a current or previous cancer treatment. (Not available for patients in Scotland.)
    A permanent fistula requiring dressing.
    Forms of hypoadrenalism such as Addison's disease.
    Diabetes insipidus and other forms of hypopituitarism.
    Diabetes mellitus except where treatment is by diet alone.
    Hypoparathyroidism.
    Myxoedema (underactive thyroid) or other conditions where thyroid hormone replacement is necessary.
    Myasthenia gravis.
    Epilepsy requiring continuous anti-convulsive medication.
    A continuing physical disability which means you cannot go out without help from another person.

    Your doctor should have informed you if this is the case, but if you've just turned 18 it's worth checking.
    If you're 18 and in FT education you still get option C exemptions. Also the pre-payment certificate isn't worth it if a patient only gets 1 item a month; its worth it if they have 4 items in 3 months or 14 items in 12 months.
    • 91 followers
    Offline

    (Original post by pimpman777)
    Thank you for the replies. I'll see to getting this supposed HC1 form. Roughly how much discount would I be entitled to this way?

    And also, it's not for diabetes or anything like that. I'm 19 btw, on the prescription it says only 16-18s can get free.
    You'd be completely exempt if you are entitled to a HC2 certificate.

    If thats not feasable, and its more expensive on private Rxs then maybe ask for a 2 months worth of meds on 1 scripts. You'll be paying the usual charge of £7.20 for 2 months worth. If your meds are regular with little chance if dosage change most doctors don;t usually mind.
    • 91 followers
    Offline

    (Original post by Witchita)
    What about 18 in University?
    It'd be free if you study on a full time course until your 19th birthday.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Loz17)
    If you're 18 and in FT education you still get option C exemptions.
    I didn't say different.
    • 91 followers
    Offline

    (Original post by bestie)
    I didn't say different.
    Sorry that was more general. My point was more for the pre-payment certificates :blush:
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Loz17)
    Sorry that was more general. My point was more for the pre-payment certificates :blush:
    Oh see, sorry.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    You should be ok
    I'm 20 and managed to get the HC2 form =]
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by bestie)
    How old are you? If your 16-18 and in full-time education they are free. After that you have to pay full price unless you hold a HC2 certificate. To get one you need to be assessed using a HC1 form (can get from doctor, chemist, hospital, job center ect.) which takes into account your income and savings.

    If you don't and get regular medication it may be better to pre-pay your prescriptions.

    For the following conditions you get free prescriptions:

    Treatment for cancer; note this includes treatment for the effects of cancer, or treatment for the effects of a current or previous cancer treatment. (Not available for patients in Scotland.)
    A permanent fistula requiring dressing.
    Forms of hypoadrenalism such as Addison's disease.
    Diabetes insipidus and other forms of hypopituitarism.
    Diabetes mellitus except where treatment is by diet alone.
    Hypoparathyroidism.
    Myxoedema (underactive thyroid) or other conditions where thyroid hormone replacement is necessary.
    Myasthenia gravis.
    Epilepsy requiring continuous anti-convulsive medication.
    A continuing physical disability which means you cannot go out without help from another person.

    Your doctor should have informed you if this is the case, but if you've just turned 18 it's worth checking.
    useful post. Also a good reminder of how completely random health policy is.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I just got approved for one of these - I owe it all to the uni pharmacist they even let me claim back £25! Going to save me so much money next year, definatley apply, even if you dont think you are eligible although the form is a bit of a pain.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    If you're 18 and in full time education, you'll get free prescriptions til your 19th bday.

    Then, fill in an HC1 form. Their policy seems to be a little hit and miss however, in my 1st year at uni I got free prescriptions, in my 2nd I didn't despite being worse off!! I think it was cos my Dad was giving me more money, but the reason was that my accomodation was more expensive (house rather than halls). They only seemed to look at money coming in, not going out.

    To give you an idea, I lived off about £5000 in my first year, and about £6000 in my 2nd year. This was 4 years ago so maybe the cut offs will have changed a bit but if your income is much more than that there's probably no point applying!
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Never had to pay for it in Cardiff but I've heard you have to pay around 7 bucks if you're in England. Not too sure about Scotland and NI.

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: September 10, 2010
New on TSR

Exclusive Nick Clegg interview

Your questions answered by the deputy prime minister

Article updates
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.