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The "Are my grades good enough for Maths..." Thread

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    (Original post by Miyata)
    Thanks officeface and ttoby
    That relieved my stress a bit xD So if I would do maths + computer science course I would come out with 2 degrees? Does it mean each course would be smaller, or it's same as taking up two courses and if I would've chosen only computer science it would same computer science as in the course computer science + maths? Or if I would've chosen maths it would identical to the computer science + maths? That would mean I would've have to put in double the effort. I don't really get it as why there are two courses. If I want to be a programmer (I'm not sure exactly whom I would want to be, something to do with computers, but on higher end of salary), which would would be better to chose?
    If you do computer science and maths then the worload of each of the two subjects would be half of what it would be in a normal degree, so the total workload is the same and you would end up with one degree. I'm not really sure which one's better for going into programming.
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    (Original post by Jed123)
    Your choice on which you choose but you come out with one degree and for maths and comp. The applied maths modules are usually replaced with computer science modules so you don't do stats and mechanics but you do pure maths and comper science. I think.
    Thanks.
    (Original post by ttoby)
    If you do computer science and maths then the worload of each of the two subjects would be half of what it would be in a normal degree, so the total workload is the same and you would end up with one degree. I'm not really sure which one's better for going into programming.
    Thanks.

    So are there any people who are doing computer science and could help me with this question? I want to find out which one will do me better, or they are the same?
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    (Original post by Miyata)
    Thanks.

    Thanks.

    So are there any people who are doing computer science and could help me with this question? I want to find out which one will do me better, or they are the same?
    That's impossible to answer but if you generalise for computer programing comp science but for other jobs like finance and any other maths related career maths and comp would be better. But a 1st in comp is better than a 2.1 in maths and comp even for jobs that don't involve computer programming. So choose which one you will enjoy more. Option one pure maths and computer science or just comp science which still involves lots of maths but not a lo of pure maths.
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    (Original post by Miyata)
    Thanks.

    Thanks.

    So are there any people who are doing computer science and could help me with this question? I want to find out which one will do me better, or they are the same?
    You could ask in the computer science forum http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=52
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    (Original post by Jed123)
    That's impossible to answer but if you generalise for computer programing comp science but for other jobs like finance and any other maths related career maths and comp would be better. But a 1st in comp is better than a 2.1 in maths and comp even for jobs that don't involve computer programming. So choose which one you will enjoy more. Option one pure maths and computer science or just comp science which still involves lots of maths but not a lo of pure maths.

    (Original post by ttoby)
    You could ask in the computer science forum http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=52
    Thanks guys you were really helpful. I still have lots of time, so I think that's enough information for me. I will concentrate with my studies this moment, and when I will have more time, in summer or maybe on holidays I will research about it more and perhaps ask more about it in computer science forum. These answers satisfied me for now xD Thanks again.
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    I think I will say that as a general rule if you can get AA in Maths and Further Maths, you will be very well set for the vast majority of maths courses, though don't expect it to be necessarily easy.

    I suppose Cambridge (and possibly warwick) are the biggest (but by no means only) exception to this rule, if you are good enough for cambridge maths, the honest answer is, you should find it easy to get 95%+ in all the maths modules of A level, if this isnt true, it is unlikely you will be able to tackle STEP.

    Again if you strongly disagree with me, then by all means reply, neg repping without any sort of explanation does not help anyone.
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    (Original post by QuantumOverlord)
    I think I will say that as a general rule if you can get AA in Maths and Further Maths, you will be very well set for the vast majority of maths courses, though don't expect it to be necessarily easy.
    No. I have seen people with all A*s at A-Level (yes including Maths and Further Maths) struggle with degree level mathematics. It very much depends on the individual. A-Level maths (and indeed further maths) is a very weak indicator of how 'suited' someone is for a maths course. This tends to be the case, more so for maths than other subjects - when studied at univeristy level.

    (Original post by QuantumOverlord)
    I suppose Cambridge (and possibly warwick) are the biggest (but by no means only) exception to this rule, if you are good enough for cambridge maths, the honest answer is, you should find it easy to get 95%+ in all the maths modules of A level, if this isnt true, it is unlikely you will be able to tackle STEP.
    Not really. Imperial, Oxford?

    I got around an average of about 75% across all the modules I took (as is stands now) and am confident enough to say I'm comfortable with STEP (well, STEP I at least :rolleyes:).

    (Original post by QuantumOverlord)
    Again if you strongly disagree with me, then by all means reply, neg repping without any sort of explanation does not help anyone.
    I have - and as tempted as I was to neg you I thought I'd do this instead.
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    (Original post by ttoby)
    If you do computer science and maths then the worload of each of the two subjects would be half of what it would be in a normal degree, so the total workload is the same and you would end up with one degree. I'm not really sure which one's better for going into programming.
    Some unis take up to 2/3 from each subject in joint honours degrees.
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    (Original post by Jam')
    Some unis take up to 2/3 from each subject in joint honours degrees.
    I don't know where they do that, but they certainly don't at Oxford.
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    (Original post by Ree69)
    No. I have seen people with all A*s at A-Level (yes including Maths and Further Maths) struggle with degree level mathematics. It very much depends on the individual. A-Level maths (and indeed further maths) is a very weak indicator of how 'suited' someone is for a maths course. This tends to be the case, more so for maths than other subjects - when studied at univeristy level.

    Yes I did write in my post that I didnt expect it to be 'necesarily easy', my point was for most maths courses AA at A level shows that you should be able to hack it, and indeed most people do if you look at the statistics. Everyone will struggle at some point, this isnt unusual but they tend to come out with good honours degrees anyway

    Not really. Imperial, Oxford?

    I said Cambridge and warwick were the biggest exception, I also tried to make clear they certainly were not the only ones, I was just trying to make the point, Cambridge (and possibly warwick Degrees) are something else.

    I got around an average of about 75% across all the modules I took (as is stands now) and am confident enough to say I'm comfortable with STEP (well, STEP I at least :rolleyes:).

    The fact is this wouldnt be true of most people, the vast majority of people that get 11 in step will also get A*A* in A level, and score generally 90% plus across all their modules, as always there will be exceptions.



    I have - and as tempted as I was to neg you I thought I'd do this instead.

    Feel free to neg me, if you think I deserve it, I just rather people would tell me why, if they are going to do it, thanks therefore for your very reasoned responce
    Ps: I hope you pass Step are you just doing it for fun? or applying to warwick?
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    Yeah I mean I'd probably agree with most of the points you mentioned there - I'd just maybe put Imperial as a bigger exception to Warwick and possibly Oxford. The final two years of an Imperial maths degree look horrible.

    (Original post by QuantumOverlord)
    Ps: I hope you pass Step are you just doing it for fun? or applying to warwick?
    Cheers! Well both really, but now I'm somewhat looking to avoid STEP prep because of (laziness ) and I've got other ideas in mind of how to spend my gap year. I'm inevitably going to be spending the next 3/4 years doing maths - I thought maybe I should do something wild over the next few months haha.

    In case you're wondering, I've applied to both Maths and MORSE at Warwick and will probably firm the latter should I receive an offer - although I'm still waiting! If I get rejected, I should really get a crack on with this STEP preparation..
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    (Original post by Ree69)
    Yeah I mean I'd probably agree with most of the points you mentioned there - I'd just maybe put Imperial as a bigger exception to Warwick and possibly Oxford. The final two years of an Imperial maths degree look horrible.



    Cheers! Well both really, but now I'm somewhat looking to avoid STEP prep because of (laziness ) and I've got other ideas in mind of how to spend my gap year. I'm inevitably going to be spending the next 3/4 years doing maths - I thought maybe I should do something wild over the next few months haha.

    In case you're wondering, I've applied to both Maths and MORSE at Warwick and will probably firm the latter should I receive an offer - although I'm still waiting! If I get rejected, I should really get a crack on with this STEP preparation..
    I never took STEP but I did lots of practice papers, I will say that personally I found STEP 2 easier than STEP 1, so dont rule that out in your case, since warwick will take an offer from any of them, you could even do both to maximise your chances. I wouldnt reccomend STEP 3 though...
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    What would people say counts as a large maths department? 60+? 80+?
    I know this isn't the right thread for this but I thought it too trivial a question to open a new thread for.
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    (Original post by Julii92)
    What would people say counts as a large maths department? 60+? 80+?
    I know this isn't the right thread for this but I thought it too trivial a question to open a new thread for.
    There are quite a few listings of the size of various uni maths departments here
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    (Original post by Ree69)
    No. I have seen people with all A*s at A-Level (yes including Maths and Further Maths) struggle with degree level mathematics. It very much depends on the individual. A-Level maths (and indeed further maths) is a very weak indicator of how 'suited' someone is for a maths course. This tends to be the case, more so for maths than other subjects - when studied at univeristy level.
    Did you ask them why?
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    (Original post by AshleyB1)
    Did you ask them why?
    Not surprising. Degree level maths is so vastly different from A-Level, it's a completely different subject really (pure more than applied).
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    (Original post by AshleyB1)
    Did you ask them why?
    Things just don't 'click' as naturally as they did at A-Level. This means people have to work harder than expected - which a lot are reluctant to do! I'm not sure why, but I know a lot of lazy mathematics students .

    As the above poster emphasises, maths really is different ball game altogether at univeristy level.
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    (Original post by Ree69)
    Things just don't 'click' as naturally as they did at A-Level. This means people have to work harder than expected - which a lot are reluctant to do! I'm not sure why, but I know a lot of lazy mathematics students .

    As the above poster emphasises, maths really is different ball game altogether at univeristy level.
    Scary stuff. Thanks anyway tho. ^^

    But yeah, I'm in Y12;

    */AAAAA/BBBBB/C at GCSE, the * was for maths and one of the As was stats

    and, if I'm being realistic;

    AAAB in Further/Maths, Chemistry and Ancient History A-Levels respectively, plus Cs in English Language and Critical Thinking AS. I know my A-Level choices are kind of messed up but oh well they seemed like a good idea at the time. ;-;

    What sort of tier of university would I be looking at? I have at least three hundred hours of voluntary work experience on my side but presumably places like Oxbridge and Imperial and stuff would be a waste of an application, given the C and Bs at GCSE, plus poorly chosen A-Levels. I heard places called Manchester, Warwick and Bath are known for being good maths universities (and that Bath is lovely) but aren't really really really exclusive and things... But idk, I haven't really looked into stuff yet. :eek:
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    (Original post by AshleyB1)
    Scary stuff. Thanks anyway tho. ^^

    But yeah, I'm in Y12;

    */AAAAA/BBBBB/C at GCSE, the * was for maths and one of the As was stats

    and, if I'm being realistic;

    AAAB in Further/Maths, Chemistry and Ancient History A-Levels respectively, plus Cs in English Language and Critical Thinking AS. I know my A-Level choices are kind of messed up but oh well they seemed like a good idea at the time. ;-;

    What sort of tier of university would I be looking at? I have at least three hundred hours of voluntary work experience on my side but presumably places like Oxbridge and Imperial and stuff would be a waste of an application, given the C and Bs at GCSE, plus poorly chosen A-Levels. I heard places called Manchester, Warwick and Bath are known for being good maths universities (and that Bath is lovely) but aren't really really really exclusive and things... But idk, I haven't really looked into stuff yet. :eek:
    You do have a good combination of A-levels (maths, further maths, a science). You are doing quite a lot of subjects so I would recommend dropping English language and critical thinking after AS.

    If you get those predicted grades at AS then that would put you in a very good position for applications. My main question is: what sort of UMS marks have you been getting for maths/further maths and how confident are you of getting an A* in one or both of those subjects? Most of the universities you mentioned want A* in maths (Manchester only needs an A) and some ask for A* in further maths as well.

    Your GCSEs aren't too bad - six subjects at grade A or above. Universities would be focussing more on how you do at AS/A2. Have you heard of/looked at STEP papers? A few of the top universities are asking for these in some/all of their offers. You say you're looking for universities that are 'exclusive' - could you elaborate on what you mean by that?

    In terms of your chances of getting an offer, Warwick would give you one automatically (providing you maintain your current standards) but it will be a hard offer. For the other universities you would have to compete to get offers, but it's hard to say what your chances of meeting them are at this stage - it depends on how likely you are to get A*s at A2.
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    (Original post by ttoby)
    You say you're looking for universities that are 'exclusive'
    *aren't. I meant, "I presume that Oxbridge and Imperial would be overoptimistic, therefore which ones are there around which won't have quite such fierce competition for places?"

    A* in maths is very achievable, and probably further too if I work at it (though we're not doing that until next year, so I know very little of the course). I had a look at a few STEP and AEA questions. I could do many of the AEA ones, but haven't attempted any STEP questions yet - I only heard of them yesterday.

    Not entirely sure what UMS stands for but I averaged 85% for C1, C2 and M1, and got 90% in a C3 mock we had lately. That 85% was dragged down a lot by C2 which was something like 72% - I'm retaking that. Hopefully that's what you meant.

    And yeah I meant I'm expecting to finish with Cs in CT AS and English AS, and am dropping them so they will only be ASs, not A2s.

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