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Problems with walking my puppy

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    I've got an Alsatian puppy aged 20 weeks and we've been walking her for about a month now, but everytime I take her out she tries to chase after cars when they drive past her, and she pulls so strongly on her lead that I have to actually stop walking whenever I see a car coming before she can see it. I walk her near a busy road and I know this is really dangerous. Can anyone could give me some advice on how to stop her doing this? Thanks
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    You need to be stern with her, and tell her off when she does this, tug on the lead or maybe stopping and tapping her on the nose, i know its cruel but sometimes it's the only way they learn!
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    Make loud unpleasant noises whenever she does this. (embarrassing.. I know) also, when ever she does this stop and make her sit for about 10-15 seconds before patting her and continuing, and whenever she ignores a car praise her.

    The first is classical conditioning
    i.e Chasing cars = Loud noise = unpleasant = chase cars less to avoid unpleasantry

    the second is operant conditioning
    i.e Associating chasing with punishment and not chasing with rewards



    Hope this helps
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    Chasing cars/anything with moving wheels is quite common i think! Our border terrier puppies used to do that.
    In terms of how to stop them, there are a few ways

    1. When you see a car coming you could try keep your puppys attention on you by calling them, maybe holding a treat in your hand and giving it to them once the car has passed (if they dont try to chase it).
    2. Something we use- we have a collar which has pressurised water in it, so you put it on your puppy, and when they do an undesirable behaviour you click the remote, and it beeps (to warn them), if they continue you press it again, and it squirts water. This makes them learn by association to not do the said behaviour.

    The collars are a bit pricey, i think about £80 but we use it for so many things- stopping the dog running away on walks, stopping them barking early in the morning (you can buy ones that squirt water when they bark, so obviously only put it on at nights). They also are totally dog-friendly, the water only goes on their 'chin', so its not in their eyes or anything.

    Hope that helps a little
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    let go
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    (Original post by Polly1101)
    The collars are a bit pricey, i think about £80 but we use it for so many things- stopping the dog running away on walks, stopping them barking early in the morning (you can buy ones that squirt water when they bark, so obviously only put it on at nights). They also are totally dog-friendly, the water only goes on their 'chin', so its not in their eyes or anything.

    Hope that helps a little

    Classical conditioning to the rescue!

    Woo
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    Try Cesar Millan's tip of filling a bottle or can with gravel and shaking it hard to distract her when she goes for a car. It works quite well in general, but it depends on the manner in which she is going for the car, you know, like her motivation. But yeah, as above, a different type of collar or harness might help. Good luck.
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    (Original post by Sim188)
    Make loud unpleasant noises whenever she does this. (embarrassing.. I know) also, when ever she does this stop and make her sit for about 10-15 seconds before patting her and continuing, and whenever she ignores a car praise her.

    The first is classical conditioning
    i.e Chasing cars = Loud noise = unpleasant = chase cars less to avoid unpleasantry

    the second is operant conditioning
    i.e Associating chasing with punishment and not chasing with rewards



    Hope this helps
    You did a psychology A-Level I'm guessing? :P: But yes, good advice
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    (Original post by karateworm)
    You did a psychology A-Level I'm guessing? :P: But yes, good advice
    Hahaha we learned it for treating autism
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    (Original post by karateworm)
    You did a psychology A-Level I'm guessing? :P: But yes, good advice
    Haha, i think this too whenever someone feels the need to name 'classical' or 'operant' conditioning
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    You can buy special leads/collars as well if your dog is too strong. The best ones are head collars, they stop the dog using all their body weight to push forward.
    These wont stop the behaviour problem though, but it will at least mean you dont have to worry about your dog running under a car.
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    Thanks for the tips guys the collar's a little out of my price range at the moment, but I'll definitely try making her sit and giving her treats when she doesn't chase them, thank you
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    (Original post by Polly1101)
    Haha, i think this too whenever someone feels the need to name 'classical' or 'operant' conditioning
    If you've got it, flaunt it!

    (my psychology knowledge that is:P)
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    Even a harness could help control your dog. Mine pulls quite strongly too and this definitely helps.
    Would your dog carry something? I remember my dog used to bark on walks at people and we started giving her a stick to carry or a newspaper on the way back from the shops. Even a ball would work? Worth a shot!
    Keep talking to her when you're walking, praise her for good behaviour. Hold her lead across your body so she is forced to walk closer in, and on the opposite side from the traffic.
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    If all else fails, use corporal punishment.
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    Disagree with most of the above lol.

    She's a herding breed, she was bred to chase things away that came near her sheep!

    This behaviour is instinctive BUT treatable.

    Start on a quiet road, one with a car every so often, when she notices the car say GOOD GIRL!! and give treat. Therefore looking at car = so so so amazing it's the best thing she's ever done for you!
    Once she's mastered this, move to a slightly busier road, one with cars more frequently, if she freaks out at all/you miss it etc just go back a stage to the quieter road until she doesn't react. Then work your way gradually to the more busier road, it's possible she's scared of the cars as well, imagine something really fast coming towards you and you don't know what it is! Flight/fight response

    Positive reinforcement is the best way ^^ If you get stuck just drop me a message
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    I completely agree with Pawsies. I find it very disheartening that almost everyone has instantly jumped to punishment and aversion - especially saying that "it's the only thing that works", which is not only not true but positive methods have been shown time and time again to be more effective.
    How fantastic would it be if you could raise a happy, confident dog by encouraging her and educating her - rather than resorting to things she doesn't like, simply because she doesn't understand what you want yet?

    You can also try teaching her the "watch me!" command; you just put a treat by your eye, and when her eye contacts yours, you praise and reward. Eventually when you tell her this she will look straight into your eyes; that's what you want.
    That way, you have her full attention. Then, if you see a car in the distance, you can get her full attention and try to keep it - but remember, the TINIEST improvements - even if she looks at you for several seconds than longer - need reward. Draw lots of attention to it when she pays attention to you, rather than the cars.
    Also, when she DOES lunge for the car, make a loud, abrupt "ah-ah!" noise (you know, like if a child does something naughty? that noise. It's more sharp, and dog-like, than our "no"s, and will grab her attention and be easier to understand as "wrong" behaviour, than saying "no, stop" which is gobbley-gook to dogs), and quickly turn in the opposite direction to the car/she is lunging. It should get her attention sharply. Or as ridiculous as it feels, if you struggle to get her attention, make lots of extremely high pitched "lalablupblah" ridiculous noises, haha. It really grabs their attention, and you can clap and try to get her to come to YOU rather than following the cars.
    Don't tug the lead, or pull her - just turn and walk away. She'll feel the lead go, and will follow eventually. Tugging and pulling doesn't work.
    A clicker might really help in this respect - when you've paired the click and treat enough times for her to know that's good, you can then mark the brief moments of her looking at you, or the moments BEFORE she chases (but be careful, then, not to mark her just about to lunge - but when she's standing normally, even if she's looking at the cars). Then, you can prolong the amount of time of her watching the cars rather than chasing, until she just watches them go past.
    Then, you can shape her to behave normally instead of staring at the cars.

    Also, is there anywhere you can walk her NOT by this busy road? Not forever - just until you can get this habit nipped in the bud. You can desensitise her to the cars, to ignore them, by walking her where there are fewer cars, and then when she's ready, you can take her to your usual busy road when she can handle it.

    But just remember, either way - REWARD. Always, always, always give her feedback when she does the right thing, even if it is only for two seconds - then build on it.
    And good for you, for correcting it while she's a pup! So many don't and then they get a biiiiiig strong dog with these kind of problems.
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    I also agree with Pawsies rather than earlier replies. I was going to add a suggestion of teaching a watch me command, but farawayheartbeat has also done that! Remember while this is an undesirable behaviour your dog isn't doing it to be naughty, it's just instinct, so keep calm and consistent and don't expect instant results.

    In order to give you more control a Halti is useful for stopping big dogs pulling dangerously. The dog may not love wearing a Halti but if it's a choice between a Halti and causing a road accident there's an obvious choice. Just make sure you read the instructions that come with it.
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    i saw a program on the tv last week about a collie type who wanted to chase cars (and bikes). Apparently this is a natural instinct and more dominate in certain dogs. The owners were taught to act before the car caught the dogs attention. So to wave a treat, or something that the dog responds positively too, in front of the dogs face and let him eat it while the car goes by. But you have to have faster reactions to the car than the dog, or you wont get his attention quick enough. If you have only got a puppy, stick with it. Good luck
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    (Original post by Helena107)
    I've got an Alsatian puppy aged 20 weeks and we've been walking her for about a month now, but everytime I take her out she tries to chase after cars when they drive past her, and she pulls so strongly on her lead that I have to actually stop walking whenever I see a car coming before she can see it. I walk her near a busy road and I know this is really dangerous. Can anyone could give me some advice on how to stop her doing this? Thanks
    Hey,
    I've had dogs my whole life and have corrected this behaviour before so I can definitely help you out.

    1. Stand next to the road and distract her barking with her favourite toy or tasty treat. Everytime a car goes past, give her one AS it goes past. Be sure to praise her because when she is busy with something else she isn't barking.
    2. Do this everyday for 3 days to a week (your choice).
    3. Then give her a treat AFTER everytime a car goes past, but only if she is silent. Praise her LOTS AND LOTS!


    If this doesn't work then feel free to message me and I can help you out - there are a couple other ways of fixing it, but the one I've written offers a version that doesn't involve punishment and telling off.

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