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Home Fundraising Ltd and other door to door charity fundraising companies

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    I may start working for Home Fundraising Ltd and I'm just wondering about people's experiences with such companies, specifically this one. I've heard some bad things about these kinds of places.
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    I did all the training and such then ended up not going for it, for reasons out of my control. From what I have heard, it can be quite hard work, and they arn't shy about kicking you out if you don't meet targets. But during my training and everything, everyone was great it all looked pretty positive.
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    (Original post by rick_james)
    I did all the training and such then ended up not going for it, for reasons out of my control. From what I have heard, it can be quite hard work, and they arn't shy about kicking you out if you don't meet targets. But during my training and everything, everyone was great it all looked pretty positive.
    Ah right cheers. How long did you stay there for? How long is the training and are you paid during that period? Do they tell you to be pushy during training? Can this sort of work be quite demoralising? thanks for the message.
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    (Original post by Yosso)
    Ah right cheers. How long did you stay there for? How long is the training and are you paid during that period? Do they tell you to be pushy during training? Can this sort of work be quite demoralising? thanks for the message.
    The training was 2 days, about 12 hours in total I think(not entirely sure on that) you do get paid however you have to work for a certain period of time before you get it. Think it was a couple of months. The training is quite heavy, a lot of learning about the charities, can be quite depressing really.

    The techniques they use arn't really underhanded, they just pretty much tell you to honestly sell the charity, kind of guilt trip them into signing up. The training basically teaches you to be confident welcoming and friendly.

    I heard it can be very demoralising, your going to have to put up with rejection 100's of times, and some can be very rude. Also there is a lot of traveling involved, if your lucky enough to be put in a group with someone who drives it wouldn't be too bad, but I was looking at traveling about an hour every day, unpaid might I add.
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    (Original post by rick_james)
    The training was 2 days, about 12 hours in total I think(not entirely sure on that) you do get paid however you have to work for a certain period of time before you get it. Think it was a couple of months. The training is quite heavy, a lot of learning about the charities, can be quite depressing really.

    The techniques they use arn't really underhanded, they just pretty much tell you to honestly sell the charity, kind of guilt trip them into signing up. The training basically teaches you to be confident welcoming and friendly.

    I heard it can be very demoralising, your going to have to put up with rejection 100's of times, and some can be very rude. Also there is a lot of traveling involved, if your lucky enough to be put in a group with someone who drives it wouldn't be too bad, but I was looking at traveling about an hour every day, unpaid might I add.
    thanks a lot. you have to pay for your own travel? how much does that detract from the pay? is the work safe? Call me paranoid, but knocking on random people's doors does sound a little daunting - you never know what's going to be behind there, what kind of areas does the company target? surely not rough areas? thanks again.
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    Home fundraising? Oh i used to work for them. Its a hard job really especially with the cold and like knocking on people's doors. A lot of people's doors you would knock on, will probably be not in the mood tbh due to like its getting dark and a lot of people don't really want to be talking with random strangers on their door stepes. Then again not everyone you may meet, will be rude.

    There is also a targets system for the job and i think that is like you have to meet your set targets every week you work...and something about if you go through like 3 or 4 weeks without getting enough sign ups, they fire you.

    Personally i'm glad i left the job, i found it to be very sales like. Like especially with my team leader and group, the whole charity ethos went out through the window and it was all very sales like. And like i never felt comfortable trying to push people into giving their bank details , however my team leader kept pressuring me into using all these very sneaky, maunpliative sales tactics to try and get people to sign on. I think thats caus he got a bonus if he's team managed to get sign ups lol.

    The training is pretty intense and i guess its caus they want to make sure they have the right people. Good luck though, you may enjoy it.
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    (Original post by Yosso)
    thanks a lot. you have to pay for your own travel? how much does that detract from the pay? is the work safe? Call me paranoid, but knocking on random people's doors does sound a little daunting - you never know what's going to be behind there, what kind of areas does the company target? surely not rough areas? thanks again.
    No worries mate, but yeah you have to pay for your own travel.

    I felt the same as well, they teach you how to deal with conflict resolution but I could imagine that is only useful to a certain extent. And surprisingly they do target rough areas, the more affluent areas actually donate less, it is the poorer, more rough areas that they make the most, so target they these quite exclusively.

    As far as being safe goes, you are basically left to your own devices if something kicks off, you will hit a street in your group of about 4. But required to go to doors on your own and your partners could be down the street, not to mention you could be invited in to fill out the forms (recomended not go in). I'm sure the majority of the time it is very safe, but if your unlucky I suppose things could turn ugly.
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    (Original post by Yosso)
    thanks a lot. you have to pay for your own travel? how much does that detract from the pay? is the work safe? Call me paranoid, but knocking on random people's doors does sound a little daunting - you never know what's going to be behind there, what kind of areas does the company target? surely not rough areas? thanks again.

    You pay for travel going to whatever destination you will be working at. However when it comes to outside london trips, they pay for your travel to and from the london station to the outside london destination. The work i would say is safe, but like i said before not everyone you meet is nice..and i know what you mean, i found it very daunting the whole experience. Well when i was working for them, we targeted like usually middle class areas.
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    I recently got a job at home fundraising and to put it down to a T is a sales job.

    At first i was very excited for it as i thought I'd be making a difference while getting paid and in some ways you are making a difference, but when i went in for the training it soon hit home that you might as well be selling double glazing to them.

    In the training you learn about the charity that you have been selected to work for you have to do a presentation about it all and sit in front of slides for a good few hours while some one goes on about how ethical the company is. ( Training isn't paid until 30 shifts after)

    The flat rate of 7 pound an hour is true, and is what tempted me to work for them but they want you in the offices at least 1/2 hours before your shift starts which are unpaid so it doesn't work out as that as well as travelling to the location you are on that day. Also you are expected to pay for your own travel to the areas that you are working at.

    They also say that it's not a commission based job but you can get a lot more wages in 'bonus' which is just a sugar coated way of saying commission.

    They supply you with a script that you are meant to learn off by heart, and you can easily replace the said charities names with npower or some double glazing company and it works just the same.

    If you can deal with walking about knocking on peoples doors in the cold, getting rejected over and over again and getting the odd 'donor' it's the job for you, but as soon as i realized that it wasn't what it wast cracked up to be i got out.
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    I worked for 3 shifts all in all, before giving in. I got no signups in my first 2 shifts so received a disciplinary. You are left to your own devices by team leaders who seem to struggle to know what to do themselves (some are promoted after just 2 weeks), I was threatened to have the police called on me at half 8 for knocking on someone's door.

    The 7 pound an hour was great, except it cost around a fiver to go to wherever we had to go to, plus on my last shift, I was getting angry phonecalls at 1pm because I'd not come into the office yet because I was in a lecture, and my shift didn't start til 3. The 18 hours a week pretty much was 25 hours and a lot of time had to be invested in learning about the charities you were working for too.

    I have a friend who has stuck with the job for over a year now, but he works 'full time' there - and he's also a reason I wouldn't go back. The 'successful' people there tended to be the drug dealers/stoners/piss-heads who just so happened to talk the talk, and the lax approach to the personal hygeine, appearance and etiquette of the staff who are representing respected charities did concern me.
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    (Original post by Snammus)
    I worked for 3 shifts all in all, before giving in. I got no signups in my first 2 shifts so received a disciplinary. You are left to your own devices by team leaders who seem to struggle to know what to do themselves (some are promoted after just 2 weeks), I was threatened to have the police called on me at half 8 for knocking on someone's door.

    The 7 pound an hour was great, except it cost around a fiver to go to wherever we had to go to, plus on my last shift, I was getting angry phonecalls at 1pm because I'd not come into the office yet because I was in a lecture, and my shift didn't start til 3. The 18 hours a week pretty much was 25 hours and a lot of time had to be invested in learning about the charities you were working for too.

    I have a friend who has stuck with the job for over a year now, but he works 'full time' there - and he's also a reason I wouldn't go back. The 'successful' people there tended to be the drug dealers/stoners/piss-heads who just so happened to talk the talk, and the lax approach to the personal hygeine, appearance and etiquette of the staff who are representing respected charities did concern me.
    You said you only worked for 3 shifts, did you still get paid for these 3 shifts the following week?
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    I've never done it personally, yet I've done sales, cold calling, etc. You have to deal with a lot of rejection - people hanging up in your face, being rude to you and so forth, but it's a great skill to have for countless life situations.

    Definitely not your dream job but it can teach you a lot. Props for "good communication skills".
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    Don't get a job with them. Awful company. I was a manager and main job was sacking people or disciplinaries. It is not a secure job and likely to be sacked before you can get a reference. It's a saturated market and most are under performing. Very few hit bonus.
    Very unprofessional environment!

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