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    (Original post by SteveMz)
    My own thinking proves valid. Wherein anything I have said... proves that I follow a train of thought that validates the studying of a degree at Portsmouth university. Please quote me, without editing, and show me this.

    To be honest, from a supposed budding journalist, your inability to follow very straight forward English and understand suppositions is frankly worrying! But then again, you are studying at Portsmouth! Only proving my point further!

    I read law at Trinity College Cambridge and have committed myself as part of an team of Ph.D students to conduct thorough research into degree courses, their financial and otherwise benefits to students, and their viability given the latest rise in frees, to project a value of various courses, academic and vocational, from different universities. When it gets published this year, and most likely the head researcher will be interviewed on BBC's this morning, as well as the actual research being referenced and posted in journals. I shall send you a copy, for you to see exactly how great portsmouth is.

    The person prior to you, who mentioned anecdotal evidence, to which she can not even prove, could be entirely made up, that herself, and another friend of hers have been recruited by 'respectable' graduate employers - without actually mentioning who these employers are (only adding to the increasingly uncertainty of her story) never mind the definition of what a 'respectable employer' is:- Apparently believes that this little story of hers, summarises the entirety of Portsmouth students graduate prospects.

    Here's a quick fact... something I almost would have expected two people studying journalism to be acquainted with, rather than unfounded, unproven evidence based off anecdotes...because unlike your amazing journalism portsmouth brains, I understand the value of empirically proving what statements and points I make. 58% of your graduates get jobs within 12 months. Most of those jobs are within the public sector, around 32%. Generally speaking, these jobs tend to be within education (which is the easiest industry to enter as long as you have any degree from any university) including follow up PGCE courses to gain qualified teacher status.

    Teachfirst, a 2year programme, to train and place teachers into under-achieving academies:- This programme largely seen to take on some of the highest achieving graduates to put into it's teacher prpgramme, takes less than 0.12% of its yearly intake from Portsmouth. Meaning that 32% of the 58% that end up getting jobs within 12 months in the public sector (paid for by taxpayers) that then select teaching/education advisory are not even considered the best potential teachers, but must complete the 1 year PGCE programme prior to teaching. I'm looking through my statistics tables now.... and of all PGCE students, around 84% pass (It is a very very easy course), yet 21% of portsmouth graduates who take the PGCE do fail it.

    Go and learn how to structure arguments, you amazing 110 word a minute shorthand writers... and take the time to realise writing words fast, does not mean you can viably argue nor structure a piece of writing, using the correct semantics and lexis as required.
    well done for getting into Cambridge. I'm not going to be pedantic and comment on grammatical errors and whatnot. but i do disagree with the last sentence of your post. shorthand is actually quite a lot like learning a new language, it uses symbols to increase speed. it is not 'hey hows u bbe? wot u up 2?'. so really it does take some degree of intellect to master.

    http://www.englishspellingsociety.or...shorthand3.gif
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    (Original post by Lionslayer)
    what do you think of the person that lives at home?
    loser- anti social- awkward to be around? doesn't like to party or drink?
    I don't live at home. Spent my 2nd and 3rd year living with friends, I didn't really have a choice due to illness in my 1st. Quite a lot of Portsmouth students are local and so live at home for at least part of their degree.
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    (Original post by Arcanen)
    I didn't even read your reply, because I just couldn't give a **** what you actually think. But the fact that you're being such a complete dick made me want to find something pedantic to pick out in an attempt to mock you. Which was successful, in my opinion...
    Your reply does not require intelligent response. It's just too pathetic. I don't wish to sink to your level.
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    (Original post by LostInLaw)
    Which I also respect. I know a lot of people don't manage a high level career from the lower ranked unis but from being here, I would argue that's more about mentality than standards. There are a number of people on my course who I believe would have been quite capable of obtaining a training contract had they put the work in for extra curriculars, work experience, developing commercial awareness etc. It's not a question of mere ability, but a vast difference in ambition.

    If you mess around at Warwick - for example - for 3 years, you'll just come out with average grades and that's not much help in the current climate. The university you attended will grant you a slight boost but you won't stand a chance against everyone who has spent their time aiming for a specific career. If people decide to go to Portsmouth for whatever reason and want to succeed, they (probably) can. Of course there is a bias towards better unis but you work hard and you keep trying and eventually you get a break. Most people who have a realistic ambition to become a high achiever in their particular sector (especially more traditional areas) won't be attending an ex-poly though.

    Sorry, I'm very tired and fear I'm rambling rather a lot. What I'm trying to say is that reason you don't see a lot of Portsmouth graduates in top jobs is because nobody's applying for them. Clearly if you take Sports Science at an ex-poly, you're not going to become an investment banker but I'd be highly surprised if any of them wanted to be! A large amount of the students do come here for a bit of a jolly, won't amount to much and waste a lot of money on it. I loathe that as much as anyone (although it affects me less than others, people don't tend to pick law for a doss!). It takes motivation and drive to make something of yourself but right now, that's required everywhere.
    You're a role model to others. I have encountered far too many people exactly as you described above - there for a jolly. Who are you working for now? You deserve every success.
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    My word, SteveMz. Back off! If people want to go to Portsmouth and do their degree, then that's fine. Let them do that, it doesn't affect you. Why must you crash a perfectly helpful thread? Not everyone has the luxury of getting into Cambridge, you know...
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    (Original post by SteveMz)
    I read law at Trinity College Cambridge and have committed myself as part of an team of Ph.D students to conduct thorough research into degree courses
    Were you required to study Law to carry out this research?

    Just strange how you seem to have some sort of agenda against ex-poly universities, when those that go there may be studying a subject that will prove greatly useful to them, and the degree will become almost invaluable. Fair play to yourself for studying at Cambridge, but for what good? Studying Law only to finish your course and commit to this "thorough research" surely proves that League Table positions can sometimes be irrelevant. Students may not be there for a "jolly" as previously stated, they may work extremely hard, but on a course which they picked because it seemed like an obvious option, rather than they want a career in it.

    If you have some long-term Law related plan, then I do apoligise, as it renders this post useless..
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    (Original post by Swindan)
    Were you required to study Law to carry out this research?

    Just strange how you seem to have some sort of agenda against ex-poly universities, when those that go there may be studying a subject that will prove greatly useful to them, and the degree will become almost invaluable. Fair play to yourself for studying at Cambridge, but for what good? Studying Law only to finish your course and commit to this "thorough research" surely proves that League Table positions can sometimes be irrelevant. Students may not be there for a "jolly" as previously stated, they may work extremely hard, but on a course which they picked because it seemed like an obvious option, rather than they want a career in it.

    If you have some long-term Law related plan, then I do apoligise, as it renders this post useless..
    Hi, i'm a third year with a dedicated interest in commercial, tort and human rights law. I have a lot of time on my hands, after my reading is done, and wish to be a legal advisor to the government concerning new bills to be passed, aswell as the review of antiquated ones hence I am working for experience sake with the Ph.D students. It's not a mainstream job at all, but an important one none the less, a huge amount of thought from different angles must go into all proposed legislation before passed. I'm not working on a league table at all, I just referred to the Times one, whose methodology was created by one of our professors.

    It is exactly your last line that is the problem. I do not disagree with those who have no wish to work in traditional fields, after all how many doctors, bankers and lawyers can we have? They are very important, however, they are being tricked by universities into thinking to pursue their interest they must have a degree in it and pay them £9000 a year for it, which is simply them getting ripped off. Only last week I met with one of the head designers for all rolex watches for example, did he do a degree in watchmaking which is now available? No, he didn't. He took up an apprenticeship, learning practically whilst earning money and gaining better experience. This extends vastly to all other employees of a non-academic industry that does not require a thick understanding of theory, derivation and application.
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    (Original post by SteveMz)
    My own thinking proves valid. Wherein anything I have said... proves that I follow a train of thought that validates the studying of a degree at Portsmouth university. Please quote me, without editing, and show me this.

    To be honest, from a supposed budding journalist, your inability to follow very straight forward English and understand suppositions is frankly worrying! But then again, you are studying at Portsmouth! Only proving my point further!

    I read law at Trinity College Cambridge and have committed myself as part of an team of Ph.D students to conduct thorough research into degree courses, their financial and otherwise benefits to students, and their viability given the latest rise in frees, to project a value of various courses, academic and vocational, from different universities. When it gets published this year, and most likely the head researcher will be interviewed on BBC's this morning, as well as the actual research being referenced and posted in journals. I shall send you a copy, for you to see exactly how great portsmouth is.

    The person prior to you, who mentioned anecdotal evidence, to which she can not even prove, could be entirely made up, that herself, and another friend of hers have been recruited by 'respectable' graduate employers - without actually mentioning who these employers are (only adding to the increasingly uncertainty of her story) never mind the definition of what a 'respectable employer' is:-Apparently believes that this little story of hers, summarises the entirety of Portsmouth students graduate prospects.

    Here's a quick fact... something I almost would have expected two people studying journalism to be acquainted with, rather than unfounded, unproven evidence based off anecdotes...because unlike your amazing journalism portsmouth brains, I understand the value of empirically proving what statements and points I make. 58% of your graduates get jobs within 12 months. Most of those jobs are within the public sector, around 32%. Generally speaking, these jobs tend to be within education (which is the easiest industry to enter as long as you have any degree from any university) including follow up PGCE courses to gain qualified teacher status.

    Teachfirst, a 2year programme, to train and place teachers into under-achieving academies:- This programme largely seen to take on some of the highest achieving graduates to put into it's teacher prpgramme, takes less than 0.12% of its yearly intake from Portsmouth. Meaning that 32% of the 58% that end up getting jobs within 12 months in the public sector (paid for by taxpayers) that then select teaching/education advisory are not even considered the best potential teachers, but must complete the 1 year PGCE programme prior to teaching. I'm looking through my statistics tables now.... and of all PGCE students, around 84% pass (It is a very very easy course), yet 21% of portsmouth graduates who take the PGCE do fail it.

    Go and learn how to structure arguments, you amazing 110 word a minute shorthand writers... and take the time to realise writing words fast, does not mean you can viably argue nor structure a piece of writing, using the correct semantics and lexis as required.


    1. Actually reading history at Oxford not that that matters. Don't talk down about other universities in that tone it really is very unpleasant. There is a reason why people think people at Oxford and Cambridge are snobs, let's not give them ammunition shall we?

    2. Clearly not all Portsmouth students go on to the best jobs, neither do Cambridge students after their undergraduate studies.

    3. So some Portsmouth graduates are less able to pass a test for teaching. Talking of evidence where is the part where you challenge the industry respectability of a Portsmouth Journalism degree? You just suggest they are less able teachers (with percentage differences easily small enough to be statistical anomalies).

    4. If we're going to insult each others' writing I take issue with the sentence structure in your third and fourth paragraphs. A personal favourite was:

    "When it gets published this year, and most likely the head researcher will be interviewed on BBC's this morning, as well as the actual research being referenced and posted in journals."

    My original point stands. Don't be a snob on a well intentioned help thread. You are perfectly a liberty to make your own threads for that.
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    (Original post by SteveMz)
    Hi, i'm a third year with a dedicated interest in commercial, tort and human rights law. I have a lot of time on my hands, after my reading is done, and wish to be a legal advisor to the government concerning new bills to be passed, aswell as the review of antiquated ones hence I am working for experience sake with the Ph.D students. It's not a mainstream job at all, but an important one none the less, a huge amount of thought from different angles must go into all proposed legislation before passed. I'm not working on a league table at all, I just referred to the Times one, whose methodology was created by one of our professors.

    It is exactly your last line that is the problem. I do not disagree with those who have no wish to work in traditional fields, after all how many doctors, bankers and lawyers can we have? They are very important, however, they are being tricked by universities into thinking to pursue their interest they must have a degree in it and pay them £9000 a year for it, which is simply them getting ripped off. Only last week I met with one of the head designers for all rolex watches for example, did he do a degree in watchmaking which is now available? No, he didn't. He took up an apprenticeship, learning practically whilst earning money and gaining better experience. This extends vastly to all other employees of a non-academic industry that does not require a thick understanding of theory, derivation and application.
    I take no issue with what you are saying there at all, you're quite right that learning through apprenticeships is economically efficient and I would rather see people do this than gain a degree for a non-academic job.

    I simply take issue with your derogatory tone on this well meaning thread and would suggest there are courses more worthy of attack than Portsmouth's industry accredited Journalism degree.
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    Found a Portsmouth thread, wanted some information about the uni I'm going to and whilst there was a huge amount of info on here there was also a lot of unnecessary arguing about who's better than one another? Seriously guys, waste of time.

    But thanks for the useful info!
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    Hi, was just wondering how easy it is to get accommodation that isn't halls?
    As Portsmouth is my insurance offer, so am not very likely to get into halls, iv'e heard there is a secure housing weekend, but is it good?
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    (Original post by LizziePiz)
    Hi, was just wondering how easy it is to get accommodation that isn't halls?
    As Portsmouth is my insurance offer, so am not very likely to get into halls, iv'e heard there is a secure housing weekend, but is it good?
    The find a home days are really good. I found a house (although it was a tip! other did find good places) and got on with my housemates. I'm still living with the same housemates, and so it another guy that i met on the weekend who's on my course. Though i have heard of a few people having problems; it really depends on how laid back you are, but also on how picky you're gonna be (loadsa people unnecessarily 'settle', imo)
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    (Original post by HannahMortlock)
    Ummmm... well we have something for everyone.
    Guildhall Walk (next to James Watson) has pure, V bar (does amazingly weird shots and shooters), club 8, fuzzy duck, heaven sent (strip club...!), walkabout yates' and spoons. Then there's Liquid and Envy just up the road.

    There's also Babylon off of the Guildhall which is a 90's club as well as Fleet.

    In Gunwharf there is Highlight and TigerTiger.

    Basically everything is open until 2am!
    Would also like to point out that Babylon is FREAKIN' AWESOME if you like cheesy music and Fleet has a lot of live bands play there and amazing food... more of a bar than club!!!
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    I know this thread was from a while ago.. but I've put Portsmouth as one of my choices for 2012 entry and was wondering what the accommodation policies are like?

    Portsmouth would be my insurance, and I know Uni accommodation is not guarenteed if it is not your firm choice. But do some people who put it as their insurance still get accommodation in halls of residence? Or is it ONLY for people who put it as their firm choice? Because I'm not sure I'd wanna go there if I wasn't staying in halls!
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    (Original post by hey-hey-hey)
    why the neg rep? i was simply asking a question!
    bloody hell why are you crying over neg rep lol? you even went to the lengths of quoting a post by yourself in which you moaned about being negged in your edit!

    (btw, i negged you because it's funny, you can neg me if you want )
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    (Original post by BLONDEGIRL101)
    I know this thread was from a while ago.. but I've put Portsmouth as one of my choices for 2012 entry and was wondering what the accommodation policies are like?

    Portsmouth would be my insurance, and I know Uni accommodation is not guarenteed if it is not your firm choice. But do some people who put it as their insurance still get accommodation in halls of residence? Or is it ONLY for people who put it as their firm choice? Because I'm not sure I'd wanna go there if I wasn't staying in halls!
    I'm pretty sure you wouldn't get halls if it was your insurance, not even everybody who firms Portsmouth gets halls.
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    How nice is Portsmouth to live in as a student e.g. nightlife, living costs and the feel around the city.

    Thanks very much.
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    does anyone know what the shared rooms in portsmouth university are like, like cos i know theres 2 beds but is the rooms small or larger .... ect
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    Is it true we get free cars when we join? I got other unis offering similar deals and I need to make up my mind...

    No but seriously, do the halls have wifi???
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    (Original post by Silver Aurora)
    Is it true we get free cars when we join? I got other unis offering similar deals and I need to make up my mind...

    No but seriously, do the halls have wifi???
    Halls use Resnet through the phone line, there is WiFi in some of the teaching buildings and in the library.

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