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New driver - stalling

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    I passed my test a couple of weeks ago and got an Astra SXi a couple of days ago.

    I learnt to drive in a Ford Focus and never really stalled in that as much - well I did at first, but got used to the pedals and pretty much stopped stalling.

    Now, on this new car, I have stalled quite a few times. I know it is normal to stall at first, but what I am wondering is how high should the revs be when taking off from biting point?

    The revs in my car go up in 10s, and in the Focus i went 1-2-3 so I am confused:confused:

    Anyway, any tips on how to prevent stalling. How bad is it if you give the car lots of power?

    And did you stall at first?

    I stalled in the middle of a fairly busy junction today whilst turning right and, well it was a horrific experience
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    Remember it is all about matching revs and gears to your road speed so 1-2-3 does not always apply- rest assured you will get used to it though. It isn't bad at all (save for using a little extra petrol) to give the car more revs but you need to be prepared for the extra power those revs will give when you're releasing the clutch. Often times I catapulted myself across roundabouts early on by giving my car a few too many of the old beans.

    Try to apply the gas gradually while in turn releasing the clutch and you can't go far wrong as you'll be able to control it all (you'll feel/hear the revs decreasing as the clutch matches in and the engine is connected to the wheels, this is when you apply more to compensate.)
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    (Original post by garlicbreadman)
    what I am wondering is how high should the revs be when taking off from biting point?
    It shouldn't be any more than when you learned in the Ford Focus (assuming it was a petrol engine). The zeros on the rev counter are neither here nor there; it's the first digit that matters, so 20 in your car is the equivalent of 2 in the focus. Some dials use 100 as the multiplier, some use 1000 - it's in the small print.

    What matters more is how suddenly you are popping the clutch, which is what causes a stall, particularly at busy junctions where you feel the need to move away quickly. If the clutch is more sensitive, just hold it still while the car creeps and gathers momentum. If you gradually squeeze the gas just after the car begins to creep, you can afford to ease the clutch a little more until you achieve a more pacey send-off.
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    (Original post by garlicbreadman)
    I passed my test a couple of weeks ago and got an Astra SXi a couple of days ago.

    I learnt to drive in a Ford Focus and never really stalled in that as much - well I did at first, but got used to the pedals and pretty much stopped stalling.

    Now, on this new car, I have stalled quite a few times. I know it is normal to stall at first, but what I am wondering is how high should the revs be when taking off from biting point?

    The revs in my car go up in 10s, and in the Focus i went 1-2-3 so I am confused:confused:

    Anyway, any tips on how to prevent stalling. How bad is it if you give the car lots of power?

    And did you stall at first?

    I stalled in the middle of a fairly busy junction today whilst turning right and, well it was a horrific experience
    Just keep practising. You are bound to stall at first so keep at it and you will soon get used to the car. The stalling willl soon stop with time. I was the same after i passed my test and got a car.
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    (Original post by garlicbreadman)
    I passed my test a couple of weeks ago and got an Astra SXi a couple of days ago.

    I learnt to drive in a Ford Focus and never really stalled in that as much - well I did at first, but got used to the pedals and pretty much stopped stalling.

    Now, on this new car, I have stalled quite a few times. I know it is normal to stall at first, but what I am wondering is how high should the revs be when taking off from biting point?

    The revs in my car go up in 10s, and in the Focus i went 1-2-3 so I am confused:confused:

    Anyway, any tips on how to prevent stalling. How bad is it if you give the car lots of power?

    And did you stall at first?

    I stalled in the middle of a fairly busy junction today whilst turning right and, well it was a horrific experience
    Sorry but this is what happens if you learn to drive looking at the tacho. If you learn to feel the revs rather than relying on the numbers then it doesn't matter what the rev counter says...

    If you drive listening to, and responding to, the car then changing cars becomes a lot easier - not necessarily completely problem free, but certainly easier.
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    (Original post by garlicbreadman)
    he revs in my car go up in 10s, and in the Focus i went 1-2-3 so I am confused:confused:
    Sorry but how is that confusing? Some cars rev counters operate on x100 scales and others on x1000. It even says that in the centre of the dials.
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    (Original post by garlicbreadman)
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    (Original post by Emma-Ashley)
    Sorry but this is what happens if you learn to drive looking at the tacho. If you learn to feel the revs rather than relying on the numbers then it doesn't matter what the rev counter says...

    If you drive listening to, and responding to, the car then changing cars becomes a lot easier - not necessarily completely problem free, but certainly easier.
    Totally agree with Emma, i learnt in a 1993 Peugeot 106 no tachometer, i had to feel the engine (Avatar ), its a skill you can pass on to every car you will every drive, you can feel the biting point, and when you've given too much gas that it will jolt. Tachometer in cars are different not every car has the same rev's were you've reached biting point so theirs no use in staring, feel the engine and listen out.

    If your in a car park or in a safe place with enough space where you can just let the car roll forward or backward when your in first gear clutch in and then slowly press the gas and let the clutch out really slowly and you can feel the biting point, do that a few times, just let it roll and find the biting point. Then you'l find the right spot.

    You could always keep the clutch slightly in and then you'l find the biting point and move of then slowly let go of the clutch.


    I only stalled when i first learnt and now rarely only time i stall is when im moving of from being parked at a angle, because i shift gears relatively fast i sometimes neglect the fact that the revs are getting me up from the angled position and not powering on. But i haven't done that in 6months and i passed over a year ago.

    If you stall don't panic even if theirs a retard honking their horn, when i passed and i stalled a few times the honking just made it worst, worst was 4 consecutive stalls because i was so panicky, but it all comes down to experience.

    P.S dont look at the revs look at the road ahead of you.
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    I literally don't even remember. I'm like the PPs who said you just feel it. I never look at my revs, I can just feel by the car whether I'm in the right gear. You'll get used to it, it's just something you pick up on the way.
    However, all drivers stall sometimes. Even if you've been driving 30 years sometimes you just miss it and stall. I wouldn't worry about it. Just don't let people fluster you. If there is someone facing you who is giving you filthy looks, abusive hand gestures etc I like to just smile sweetly and wave....it drives them nuts and makes me giggle....maybe that's just me though
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    (Original post by FXX)
    Sorry but how is that confusing? Some cars rev counters operate on x100 scales and others on x1000. It even says that in the centre of the dials.
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    (Original post by Spexzzz)
    Totally agree with Emma, i learnt in a 1993 Peugeot 106 no tachometer, i had to feel the engine (Avatar ), its a skill you can pass on to every car you will every drive, you can feel the biting point, and when you've given too much gas that it will jolt. Tachometer in cars are different not every car has the same rev's were you've reached biting point so theirs no use in staring, feel the engine and listen out.

    If your in a car park or in a safe place with enough space where you can just let the car roll forward or backward when your in first gear clutch in and then slowly press the gas and let the clutch out really slowly and you can feel the biting point, do that a few times, just let it roll and find the biting point. Then you'l find the right spot.

    You could always keep the clutch slightly in and then you'l find the biting point and move of then slowly let go of the clutch.


    I only stalled when i first learnt and now rarely only time i stall is when im moving of from being parked at a angle, because i shift gears relatively fast i sometimes neglect the fact that the revs are getting me up from the angled position and not powering on. But i haven't done that in 6months and i passed over a year ago.

    If you stall don't panic even if theirs a retard honking their horn, when i passed and i stalled a few times the honking just made it worst, worst was 4 consecutive stalls because i was so panicky, but it all comes down to experience.

    P.S dont look at the revs look at the road ahead of you.

    (Original post by alibobs)
    I literally don't even remember. I'm like the PPs who said you just feel it. I never look at my revs, I can just feel by the car whether I'm in the right gear. You'll get used to it, it's just something you pick up on the way.
    However, all drivers stall sometimes. Even if you've been driving 30 years sometimes you just miss it and stall. I wouldn't worry about it. Just don't let people fluster you. If there is someone facing you who is giving you filthy looks, abusive hand gestures etc I like to just smile sweetly and wave....it drives them nuts and makes me giggle....maybe that's just me though
    Thanks for the advice guys. It's because it was much easier to "feel" the ford focus cos it would judder when you lifted the clutch too high so u had enough time to prevent stalling but in the vauxhall, everything very silent and smooth, and the pedals are shorter.

    But, I will definitely try taking it to a quiet place and feeling the biting point!
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    (Original post by garlicbreadman)
    Thanks for the advice guys. It's because it was much easier to "feel" the ford focus cos it would judder when you lifted the clutch too high so u had enough time to prevent stalling but in the vauxhall, everything very silent and smooth, and the pedals are shorter.

    But, I will definitely try taking it to a quiet place and feeling the biting point!
    I know what you mean, I learnt in a fiesta and drove a fiat straight after which was semi automatic so didnt need a clutch (it was also a heap of crap but anyway!) then I got a corsa and they definitely drive differently!
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    It's all about being gradual with your clutch and responding to the noise your car is making. Stop looking at your rev counter.

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