Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey! Sign in to get help with your study questionsNew here? Join for free to post

German Learners' Society MKII

Announcements Posted on
Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
    • 15 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by najabri)
    Nope, Latin is the reason I understand cases, gender, number, tenses and moods.
    good. i'm not going mad. In GCSE Latin, the pluperfect tense was always called the 'having been done tense'. So for my eng-german translations if I see X had done Y, i know i'm needing to use the pluperfect.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by .snowflake.)
    'having been done tense'.
    Wow, what a professional approach from a teacher
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Catilina)
    Wow, what a professional approach from a teacher
    ^^ Although, I wonder if that would confuse me with perfect passive participles as they're normally translated as "having been {past participle}". I think my teacher has the "time line of tenses" to differentiate between completed past tense, imperfect tense etc...
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by najabri)
    ^^ Although, I wonder if that would confuse me with perfect passive participles as they're normally translated as "having been {past participle}". I think my teacher has the "time line of tenses" to differentiate between completed past tense, imperfect tense etc...
    Yeah, I guess it´s always easier to go from a language with more complex grammar to a simpler one and not vice versa.
    • 6 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    In German you can use six different tenses to express the historical sequel of action. In the moment you speak/write you are bound to the real time. It's this 'now' that constitutes your perspective.
    perhaps this will help with the 'time line of tenses':
    Nachdem wir die Pflaumen geerntet hatten (Plusquamperfekt) After we had harvested the plums, (past perfect)
    haben wir sie gewaschen (Perfekt) we have washed them. (present perfect)
    Dann mussten wir sie entsteinen (Präteritum) Then we had to deseed them. (simple past)
    Jetzt sind sie im Topf und kochen (Präsens). Now, they are in the pot and cook. (present tense)
    Danach werden wir die Marmelade in Gläser füllen (Futur I). Afterwards we will fill the jam in jars. (future I)
    Im nächsten Sommer werden wir sie aufgegessen haben (Futur II). Until summer next year, we will have eaten all of it. (future II)

    In German, we don't have a -ing form. If you told the story in English, would it be in the way I translated it?
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by grizzlybär)
    In German you can use six different tenses to express the historical sequel of action. In the moment you speak/write you are bound to the real time. It's this 'now' that constitutes your perspective.
    perhaps this will help with the 'time line of tenses':
    Nachdem wir die Pflaumen geerntet hatten (Plusquamperfekt) After we had harvested the plums, (past perfect)
    haben wir sie gewaschen (Perfekt) we have washed them. (present perfect)
    Dann mussten wir sie entsteinen (Präteritum) Then we had to deseed them. (simple past)
    Jetzt sind sie im Topf und kochen (Präsens). Now, they are in the pot and cook. (present tense)
    Danach werden wir die Marmelade in Gläser füllen (Futur I). Afterwards we will fill the jam in jars. (future I)
    Im nächsten Sommer werden wir sie aufgegessen haben (Futur II). Until summer next year, we will have eaten all of it. (future II)

    In German, we don't have a -ing form. If you told the story in English, would it be in the way I translated it?
    We would omit the "have" in "We have washed them", otherwise I think it would still be the pluperfect tense? :confused:

    We call the -ing a present participle and would use it in the sentence "Now they are in the pot and are cooking". You can use "cook" in the present tense but as you've already used "are", it doesn't make sense as it sounds like "are cook", which is incorrect. If you didn't want to say "cooking" you could say "we cook them in the pot".

    The first future sentence is the right tense, but I think we'd change the phrasing a bit... "Afterwards we will fill the jars with jam" or "Afterwards we will put the jam in the jars".

    Finally, in the last sentence I think we would just use "Next summer we will have eaten all of it" or "We will have eaten it by the summer of next year/next summer". :^_^:

    I wonder how some languages cope without all the different tenses/verb forms.
    • 6 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    'had washed' and 'have washed' are different tenses in German. 'had washed'- Plusquamperfekt (vollendete Vergangenheit) und 'have washed' Perfekt (vollendete Gegenwart), but I'm aware that, in spoken language the tenses mix happily all over the place. It's not unusual to hear someone say: 'gestern bin ich in München gewesen/yesterday, I have been in Munich' (in fact I'm not sure this would actually be grammatically wrong to say) instead of 'gestern war ich in München/yesterday, I was in Munich. In English, I have to use simple past with 'yesterday', haven't I?
    I knew it had to be 'are cooking' but we don't have that form in German. To express that something is happening at the moment we use words like jetzt, gerade, im Moment ... und present tense.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Here´s a little challenge in case you feel especially confident about understanding difficult dialects . It´s actually a yiddish song text, but it´s possible to understand most of it. (if you´ve got a bit of time on your hands). I put most words with a hebrew origin in red, obviously knowing german doesn´t help with those.

    Oyfn pripetshik (stove) brent a fayerl,
    Un in shtub iz heys,
    Un der rebe lernt kleyne kinderlekh,
    Dem alef-beys.

    Zet zhe kinderlekh, gedenkt zhe, tayere (~precious),
    Vos ir lernt do;
    Zogt zhe nokh a mol un take (truly) nokh a mol:
    Komets-alef: o!

    Lernt, kinder, mit groys kheyshek,
    Azoy zog ikh aykh on;
    Ver s'vet gikher (faster) fun aykh kenen ivre - (hebrew pronounciation)
    Der bakumt a fon.

    Ir vet, kinder, elter vern,
    Vet ir aleyn farshteyn,
    Vifl in di oysyes (letters) lign trern,
    Un vi fil geveyn.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by grizzlybär)
    'had washed' and 'have washed' are different tenses in German. 'had washed'- Plusquamperfekt (vollendete Vergangenheit) und 'have washed' Perfekt (vollendete Gegenwart), but I'm aware that, in spoken language the tenses mix happily all over the place. It's not unusual to hear someone say: 'gestern bin ich in München gewesen/yesterday, I have been in Munich' (in fact I'm not sure this would actually be grammatically wrong to say) instead of 'gestern war ich in München/yesterday, I was in Munich. In English, I have to use simple past with 'yesterday', haven't I?
    I knew it had to be 'are cooking' but we don't have that form in German. To express that something is happening at the moment we use words like jetzt, gerade, im Moment ... und present tense.
    Yeah, you'd have to say "I went to Munich yesterday", or "I was in Munich yesterday". "I have been in Munich" works but somehow if you say "I have been in Munich yesterday" it doesn't.

    Then there are always the colloquial ways of saying things... like people saying "In town" instead of "I am in town", and "gonna" instead of "going to".
    • 6 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    why is it e.g. 'someone has lost their job' ? 'someone' is singular and 'their' a plural pronoun. Is it because you don't know the gender and by saying 'their' have them both? In German 'jemand' is masculine, so it's 'jemand hat seinen Job verloren'
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by grizzlybär)
    why is it e.g. 'someone has lost their job' ? 'someone' is singular and 'their' a plural pronoun. Is it because you don't know the gender and by saying 'their' have them both? In German 'jemand' is masculine, so it's 'jemand hat seinen Job verloren'
    Basically, yes. "They" can be used as a gender-neutral third-person singular pronoun. I personally think it's fine and use it naturally quite a lot. But I have read that it's somewhat controversial and some people consider it wrong. Bah. It's better than writing he/she and his/her...

    [EDIT:] Here we go: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singular_they !
    • 16 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    how many words take the genitive? well not a specific number but general words used in conversation. I'm bored of things that just take the accusative and stuff

    Even though i suck so bad at german one day i will convince my teacher that i'm really a champion when it comes to german
    • 15 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by chickenonsteroids)
    how many words take the genitive? well not a specific number but general words used in conversation. I'm bored of things that just take the accusative and stuff

    Even though i suck so bad at german one day i will convince my teacher that i'm really a champion when it comes to german
    the prepositions trotz, wegen, waehrend, (an)statt, innerhalb, ausserhalb all take the genitive.
    • 6 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by chickenonsteroids)
    how many words take the genitive? well not a specific number but general words used in conversation. I'm bored of things that just take the accusative and stuff

    Even though i suck so bad at german one day i will convince my teacher that i'm really a champion when it comes to german
    verbs that take the genitive: gedenken, sich erinnern, sich bedienen, sich rühmen, jemanden überführen

    adjectives: des Weges kundig, einer Sache sicher, seines Lebens überdrüssig

    prepositions: aufgrund, wegen, anhand, mittels, längs, entlang, kraft (seines Amtes), zwecks, trotz, infolge
    • 16 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by .snowflake.)
    the prepositions trotz, wegen, waehrend, (an)statt, innerhalb, ausserhalb all take the genitive.
    *adds to vocab book*

    trotz - despite (how would you say despite this blah blah blah + does it make the verb go to the end?

    wegen - because of

    (an)statt - instead of

    innerhalb - within

    ausserhalb - outside of

    Are those in the right context?
    • 16 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by grizzlybär)
    verbs that take the genitive: gedenken, sich erinnern, sich bedienen, sich rühmen, jemanden überführen

    adjectives: des Weges kundig, einer Sache sicher, seines Lebens überdrüssig

    prepositions: aufgrund, wegen, anhand, mittels, längs, entlang, kraft (seines Amtes), zwecks, trotz, infolge
    Can you explain how i'd use them to show they take the genitive? only 1 out of each section would be ok... please? :daydreaming:
    • 15 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by chickenonsteroids)
    *adds to vocab book*

    trotz - despite (how would you say despite this blah blah blah + does it make the verb go to the end?

    wegen - because of

    (an)statt - instead of

    innerhalb - within

    ausserhalb - outside of

    Are those in the right context?
    yup. aand trotz doesn't change word order. Trotz des Regens spielen wir Fussball.
    • 16 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by .snowflake.)
    yup. aand trotz doesn't change word order. Trotz des Regens spielen wir Fussball.
    Do any of them change word order?

    thanks for helping me to my goal of german domination
    • 15 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by chickenonsteroids)
    Do any of them change word order?

    thanks for helping me to my goal of german domination
    I haven't a clue. Ask google?
    • 16 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by .snowflake.)
    I haven't a clue. Ask google?
    Google sucks balls at languages i'll find out, thanks for the help

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: October 12, 2014
New on TSR

A-level results day

Is it about making your parents proud?

Article updates
Reputation gems:
You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.