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GCSE Revision & Exam Tips Thread

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    (Original post by BookWormShanti)
    I saw this too late (and the thread link is invalid) but what was he like when you met him? Say anything useful?
    Didn't know you made this thread!
    Very helpful, Shanti
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    (Original post by Ears)
    Didn't know you made this thread!
    Very helpful, Shanti
    Yeah (see the massive OP!) Thanks
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    thanks for the helpful thread
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    (Original post by BookWormShanti)
    Post your tips for exam success/how to revise and we can help each other out to get the best grades possibly This way as well as supporting each other in the chat thread, we can more easily get study help too.
    We get loads of similar threads asking these sorts of questions, hopefully this means it is easier to find advice.

    My tips:

    Credit goes to Wizard of Oz, Ree-Ree, Xurvi, Rae, LilyAcademia etc - I have moved some of their posts up here to make this thread easier to search through.

    English Language & English Literature (AQA)
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    Generally:
    • practice papers are your best friends - love them
    • learning to write well will make your life much easier
    • quote well and often
    • plan to keep a good structure


    Poetry:

    For the poetry exams the examiners want to see how well you know the poems. Upside down, inside out etc so the best thing you can do is read through your annotations/revision sites to make sure you have all the material necessary and filed away in your brain. Then you will want to be doing past papers: the more timed essays you write, the more chance the one you get in the exam is very similar to something you’ve already written.

    Make sure that for each poem (I'll focus on Lang as I've already taken the exam but this applies for Lit) you know the keys points of analysis and have it up in a page which you can easily revise from. This makes it easier when you come to do practice papers to form PEE (point, evidence, explanation) paragraphs without having to think on your feet how to write it. You can mould the material then to most questions ie if you like setting in Nothing’s Changed you can bring it in to questions asking about feelings, providing you word it right. It is crucial though that you do answer the question – there is no way you can write everything you know down about the poem so make sure you only stick to the points which are relevant and sophisticated, while covering structure as well as language etc (though the latter should be your main focus). Quality really is more than quality – analyzing one line in a lot of detail can get you more marks than several only fleetingly.

    One of the key discriminators between the A and A* is the way in which you express your ideas. This is English – a lot of it tests whether you can write well. The examiners are looking for style, fluency and just a little bit of flair. There is much you can do to learn this if you don’t have it – except reading anything always helps to improve your own writing voice. It may be worth trying to learn neat ways of putting across your points so they come across well in the exam or noting down nice phrases your teacher uses. It is especially important that your introduction and conclusion don’t just follow the formulaic “in the essay I am going to” but instead make a point and make it well: this will be the last thing your examiner reads so you want to it to wow them.

    The other key thing is linking. A lot of candidates fall down because they don’t effectively move between the two poems throughout their essay – if you write all about one poem, then the next etc you are looking at a C. You need to make sure you know how and why the poems fit together – this is especially important with literature. Teachers swear by different structures for the literature essays: say, link poem A & B with regards to language, then B&C with regards to theme, then C&D with regard to tone, then D&A with regards to structure, then variants on the same. There is no set way to get you the marks. While it’s true these do work, I find it is best to mould your plan around the poems – if you find lots comparable with style but little with language, that’s okay. Just make sure you talk about them roughly equally. For language you’ll want to be doing 1 paragraph one poem, next para the other and so on – although I often find almost every para ends up mentioning both at least briefly. Try and explain the relevance and impact of the links rather than just stating them. You may find it helpful to plan before you start (especially with Lit) so that you can get your ideas straight.

    Media
    This is the area I struggled with most – so I’m not sure I’ll be that much help! However, I found that the thing which helped me – which you should focus most of your time on – was doing lots of practice papers. For media the question are all centered around for AOs which the examiner needs to spot:
    • Engage with the texts and quote appropriately, developing your points (PEE)
    • Know the difference between fact and opinion
    • Follow an argument (what does a text say? Where is the author wrong?)
    • Again, quote effectively and reference all sources making good links
    • Know how writers use linguistic, structural and presentational devices (think rhethorical questions/emotive language, order of piece/repetition, use of pictures/layout) and how these impact the reader.
    This means that the exam papers (while having different texts) are all remarkably similar: once you can follow one argument, you should be able to follow them all and so on. Going over papers and learning the set answers (with your teacher pointing you in the right direction) are the best things to do. Try and analyse media things all around you – the mag you’re reading or a billboard sign – to get in the swing of it.

    Original Writing tasks
    It’s very hard to give advice on this given the level of subjectivity there is – but I’ll have a stab. My teacher advised us to do the Persuasion and Description tasks 99.99% of the time if you were aiming for an A/A* as apparently they are the easiest to score highly on.

    For persuasion you want to be cramming in the rhetorical devices (emotive lang, rhetorical questions, rule of 3 etc) as much as possible and writing fluently and concisely. Again, reading may help you develop your style. Read through famous persuasive speeches (I’m thinking Obama, MLKing etc) and see what they have done and try to imitate it. The examiners seem set on giving the most boring tasks about developing your school/young people’s issues year on year so those are the best to practice on. Keep your audience and appropriate tone in mind but don’t be afraid to be a little outrageous stereotyping-wise. If you can work in humour it will liven up the marking for the examiner!

    For description you need to be using all those language techniques (similes, metaphors, personification etc) while trying to write in a lively, engaging manner. Zoom in on small details of a scene and try your best to not write a story. Maybe try putting a slightly original slant on the question to liven up the marking for the examiners (though don’t go too far… like I did!). It is often best to do a quick plan for both of these two to ensure you cover the important areas and don’t just ramble on without any focus.

    Novel
    (I will fill this in as soon as I have started revising myself – as I haven’t done the exam yet. Maybe someone more qualified could give me a hand?)

    Science (AQA)
    Spoiler:
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    Generally:
    • Learn the content well
    • Do lots of past papers
    • Make sure you can do calculations
    • Try to understand rather than regurgitate


    I’m going to group it all together as the skills required are identical, while the content is different.

    For the sciences it is much less about exam technique and far more about the content. While this can be annoying if you like having a bit more freedom, it does make it far more straightforward to revise. Boiled down very simply your revision should consist almost entirely of the following things: learning the content, revising it in the way best for you & past papers.

    Again, because I’m quite a passive learner, the first thing I would do is to read through the textbooks and make notes, because I find it helps me cement it in my brain before I do all the fancy revision techniques stuff. If just sitting and reading/note taking doesn’t help you take stuff in though, don’t feel like you have to do it. You’ve heard it before but I’ll say it again, mind maps/rhymes etc can all really help. I find podcasts are great because they force you to take in the information slowly and concentrate on it 100%, and you can listen to them on the bus or whatever – check on bitesize for them.

    The key to science is (again) past papers. Even when you are revising the content and not sure of everything they help you to apply what you’ve learnt so you remember it better and keep it fresh. Plus it means at the end of a revision session you can actually see that you have achieved something concrete. Mark them yourself with the mark schemes available on the website and try to learn the little phrases the examiners like, as they are often the same year on year. If you do enough of these you should find yourself more able to answer the questions as they are often very similar.

    It seems to be true for the individual sciences that Biology is more content but less understanding; Chemistry is the most difficult to understand but has less stuff to learn; Physics is middling with both but has an awful lot of calculations, so it may be worth keeping that in mind. Calculations are easy to pick up marks on, so make sure you practice them and don’t forget the units!

    A lot of the content is repitive – much of Triple links back to Core an Additional for example, and the carbon cycle is in core Chem and add Bio. Use this to your advantage to mean you have as little as possible to learn.


    French & other Modern Foreign Languages (AQA)
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    Generally:
    • Emerse yourself in the language as much as possible
    • Don't panic - try to think clearly in the exam
    • Regularly revise vocab if you can
    • Practice makes perfect!

    Listening:

    This may sound obvious but the best thing you can do to improve your listening skills is listen to more French. People who go on exchanges often come back saying how much their skills have improved and this is largely due to the amount of exposure they get to the language. The more you here French pronunciation, the easier you will find it to pick up what they are saying. My teacher reckons that the standard of French in the listening is easier than the reading, yet this is where most people lose marks as it tends to be a bit scary! (I’m just as bad, it is by far my weakest area). Try getting some podcasts of French/songs to listen to on your iPod or do the boring thing and ask your teacher to borrow some tapes. It’s not like reading where you have a whole textbook to read in practice so make sure you don’t ignore it when you revise.

    As for the exam itself – my teacher swears that you should never write down your answer the first time you hear it and this seems to be pretty advice. This way you can ensure that you are listening fully, enabling you to have the best stab at the answer possible. Get the gist the first listen, details the second. An awful lot of what you hear will be supercilious so do your best to discern what you need from what you don’t the first time, so you can focus on the important stuff the second. Always read the question first so you know what to expect.

    I’m awful for panicking – if I don’t get something I freak out then miss the next couple of questions. Try not to be like me! If you’re stuck, it’s ok, focus on the rest of the paper. Use the “easier” starter questions to get into it.

    Reading

    Just like with the listening, the best revision you can do is to read French! Go over passages in your textbook (or even try reading French books – Harry Potter or something you’re familiar with...or French magazines about whatever it is you are into...). It will make you more familiar with the language itself and processes you need to go through to go about translating it. It is a beautiful language – try to find something about it you love and can relate to, even if the lessons at school are boring.

    Read the question before the passage so you know what you are looking for in it. Maybe you would find it helpful to underline key words or phrases or circle stuff you aren’t sure with to come back to later. I usually find I have time left at the end of my exam so will go back and translate literally word for word passages where I have struggled in cramped writing above the passage. I’m not saying do this if you don’t have much time or it seems daunting, but it can help me to work through a difficult sentence or two. If there is a word you don’t know – see if you can figure out its meaning from the rest of the passage or common sense.

    With reading you have the text in front of you – just like you would in a lesson. Try to think yourself back into that situation, take a deep breath and throw all the little bits of vocab you’ve picked up at the text.

    Learning vocab is, obviously, key. The more vocab you know the higher the chance it will apply to the text you get in the exam. Try getting a relative/relative to test you regularly on the words at the back of the chapters/vocab list. Stick it up randomly over your house where you won't forget it. Try using little mnemonics on tricky words. Associate what you learn to real life situations as much as you can so it will stick better.

    I haven’t mentioned the Writing/Speaking controlled elements – but here are some useful related posts on the matter:

    Xurvi's speaking skills tips:
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    I'd like to add interaction with natives has a huge impact, especially on Speaking skills. People are very often anxious and panicking when speaking because they feel they are being judged by the listener, and/or that they're not going to be understood, etc.

    People going abroad usually come back with good skills notably because they have gained confidence in these very skills, which allows them to speak more spontaneously, and consequently their overall language skills improve.

    In my opinion, there are two milestones in language learning - one may come before the other - : being able to think in the foreign language spontaneously (ie not having to translate in your head and think directly in the target language), and as I explain above, being confident in your language skills after having tested them in a real life situation with natives (strangers especially).

    The second one is "easy" to achieve by just going abroad for a few weeks or months (provided you immerse yourself and don't do like some Erasmus who go abroad and stay with English-speaking people).
    The first one is tougher to achieve. I think it just comes with time and practice. Using the target language more than your native language is a great way to do this (whether abroad again, or at home using the internet, etc).


    Lily's helpful idioms:
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    Faire les gros titres - to hit the headlines
    Exercer une influence sur - to have an influence on
    Tirer le signal d’alarme- to sound the alarm
    Nul ne sait encore si - no-one yet knows whether..
    Il en va de même pour - the same goes for..
    A en croire les sondages - if we are to believe the polls
    On constate avec inquiétude que - it’s a worrying fact that..
    On pourrait en dire autant pour - you could say the same for..
    Les spécialistes s’accordent à dire que - experts agree that..
    Quoi qu’il en soit - whatever the case may be
    Il est évident que - it’s obvious that..
    Notons au passage que - one should note in passing that..
    Il s’ensuit que - the result is that..
    Je ne suis pas le seul à prétendre - I’m not alone in claiming..
    Il faut également souligner que - I should also be stressed that..
    On a tendance à croire que.. - we tend to believe that..
    Reste à savoir si.. - it remains to be seen whether..
    Imaginez un peu - Just think
    Cela peut paraître idiot, mais.. - it may seem silly, but..
    Il va sans dire que.. - it goes without saying that..
    Rien d’étonnant que.. (+ subj) - it’s not surprising that..
    Il ne faut pas s’étonner que.. - it’s not surprising that
    Cela en dit long sur.. - it says a lot about..
    Plus question non plus de.. - there’s no question either of…
    J’en ai assez d’entendre.. - I’m fed up with hearing about..
    Pour couronner le tout - to cap everything
    Il nous faut démontrer que.. - we have to prove that..
    En ces temps de..- in these times of..
    Il faut examiner le revers de la médaille - you have to look at the other side of the argument
    N’oublions pas non plus.. - let’s not forget either..
    Faut-il en conclure que.. - should we conclude from this that..
    L’ennui, c’est que.. - the annoying thing is that..
    Il est important de constater que.. - it is important to note that..
    Loin de là! - Far from it!
    Il est à noter que.- it should be noted that..
    Il vaut mieux.. (+ inf) - it is better to..
    Ayant pesé le pour et le contre - having weighed up the pros and cons
    Cela va de pair avec.. - this goes together with..
    Il est indéniable que.. - It is undeniable that..
    Quoi que l’on en pense - whatever you may think of the matter
    Tout le monde s’accorde à dire que.. - everyone agrees that..
    Si j’ose le dire - if I may venture to suggest
    En guise de conclusion - in conclusion





    RE (OCR Philosophy & Ethics)
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    Generally:
    • Learn the content with fun, active methods
    • Practice papers again!
    • Get your timing right
    • Learn the bible quotes
    • Have an opininon


    There are a lot of different paper options here and 8 different units, so I’ll just do a general post instead covering both the Philosophy & Ethics exams.

    With RE it can feel like there is a lot of content because of the sheer amount of units but actually, compared with the Sciences or History, I find there isn’t that much. The first thing I would do is make sure you have good, concise and understandable notes as that’s what helps me get to grips with the content. Highlight/colour code any biblical material as you’ll want to find this fast. Then I’d start doing Mind maps/diagrams/jingles etc to help you soak it in if you’re that sort of person (things like that irritate me to distraction, but my friend swears by them) or concise them into flash cards. Do this enough and it should start sticking in your brain. There are lots of little youtube clips around to liven things up a bit, should you want. You should also find that there is a lot of overlap – between Nature of Deity/Science & Religion units or War, Peace & Justice/Religion & Equality content, let alone the bible quotes. This means there is less stuff to learn that you’d assume at first. Because RE is one of those debating subjects I would definitely recommend talking it through with friends if you can because this will help you flesh out your opinions – useful for those section E questions!

    I’m starting to sound like a stuck record but really the best thing you can do once you know the stuff is practice papers. This will help you work on the timings you need and what/how much you need for each question. The first few shouldn’t take you long but you’ll want just fewer than 15 mins for the section E essays. Remember on these to lay them out pretty formulaically: what is the question asking? Why is it important to Xns? What do some/other/a few Xns say? What do you think? When you get confident you can mess around with this to make it read better but it is generally a good plan to ensure you cover everything. Don’t skimp on your opinion – it doesn’t need to be that long but it should be well thought out. Make sure you put in enough biblical quotes or ideas - it is Re after all! Get your teacher to mark everything and tell you what to improve upon.


    History (OCR B – Modern World)
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    Generally:
    • Learn the content well
    • Learn the dates
    • Work on time management
    • Practice source analysis

    The units can vary from school to school but these are what Wizard & I do:

    International Relations/Germany Depth Study
    The skills being tested are virtually identical for these two papers and there really is no way round the truth – you just have to learn the content and learn it well. That means not only the dates (and yes, there are lots!) but the causes, different historical interpretations etc. Go with the revision method that works best for you. I wrote out my notes, read them out to unsuspecting people and then did practice papers, but Ree is right that mnemonics like LAFSAG (for what Hitler believed) or GARGLE (for the terms of the treaty of Versailles) can be really helpful. A good way of remembering things is to try and understand what you’re being asked to learn. Put yourself in the shoes of someone from the time to try and empathise with them – say a German who has just found out the terms of the TofV or a Jew in the years before WW2. Maybe try linking the dates to important events – my teacher is born on the day Hitler came to power, my mother on the start of WW1 etc. Or just recite them to yourself, stick them up around your house and hope they go in.

    Try and keep revising throughout the course but if you leave it to the last minute (like me, I don’t listen to my own advice often!) don’t worry – Ree & I prove it can be done in small amounts of time. Quite a lot of the content should have dripped into your brain without you realizing it throughout the year and the helpful thing with history is that, to quote the History Boys, it’s just “one f***ing thing after another”, so if you know something it can help you to work out what else happened using logic.

    In the exam itself timing is vital – you need to have time to flesh out your answers on the longer questions by trying to to waffle on the shorter ones. I’m not really one to talking about waffling, but I have very fast (if illegible) writing to make up for it – you might not be so lucky. If a question is worth 6 marks it wants 6 points – giving 9 when you don’t have much time is not going to be worth your while. My teacher always repeated “PRIORITISE & LINK” until we were sick of the words – but they are important. You want to be showing you understand how factors fit together as it is crucial to get in the highest boundaries. Again, past papers are the key to getting on top of exam technique.

    Britain Depth Study – source based

    This paper is fundamentally testing how well you can interpret historical sources. You have to know your facts and statistics to achieve the higher grades so again, learning to content and dates in the way described above is vital. However, a conceptualised response to the source is often the difference between an A and an A*. You have to acknowledge that all sources 'to an extent' are biased, and depending on what type of source it is – news paper article, diary extract etc – and who wrote it/why they did, it may have a certain amount of credibility. You want to be able to fit it into historical events to help you establish how useful and/or reliable it is. Back up your points with quotes, outside knowledge or statistical evidence – avoid making a point unless you can explain it. Again, answer according to the mark allocation. It is very helpful to look at numerous sources prior to your exam. Some pictures used by the exam board could easily be misinterpreted so if you know a majority of the sources, you won't fall into that trap. Learn the key words and concepts for source analysis and you’ll be fine.


    Useful Websites
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    Generally:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/
    http://getrevising.co.uk/
    http://beanbaglearning.com/resources/159-exam-technique
    Maths:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/maths247
    http://www.examsolutions.co.uk/GCSE-...ials/index.php
    http://www.khanacademy.org/
    English:
    http://www.teachit.co.uk/armoore/default.htm
    http://www.youtube.com/user/WCSEngli.../2/VJWdoluPpGY
    http://www.youtube.com/user/helpmemrdavies
    History:
    http://web.mac.com/gileshill/history...E_History.html
    http://www.johndclare.net/
    RE:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/

    More to come! (Geography/Maths)
    I was wondering if you can help me figuring out what I need to get in my Eng Language and Lit exams to get A*s.
    I got an overall mid-A for English Language coursework
    and high-A for English Lit coursework

    Roughly what percentage would i need to get in the exams to get A*s? thanks.
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    (Original post by zactissue)
    I was wondering if you can help me figuring out what I need to get in my Eng Language and Lit exams to get A*s.
    I got an overall mid-A for English Language coursework
    and high-A for English Lit coursework

    Roughly what percentage would i need to get in the exams to get A*s? thanks.
    Each mark you get in the Language exam is worth 3x each mark in your coursework. For an A* in the exam you need 98/108 (so 91%), if you're coursework is mid A then you'll need more like 95% (more like 103 or 4), I'd reckon. I could work it out properly if I knew your exact mark in each coursework componenent, but that should give you a rough idea.

    Lit coursework is only worth 30% not 40% and with a high A I'd say you'd need about 92%. Because the grade boundaries are usually around 90% and sometimes lower, with your coursework you'll need slightly more.

    Those are only rough estimates though
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    (Original post by BookWormShanti)
    Each mark you get in the Language exam is worth 3x each mark in your coursework. For an A* in the exam you need 98/108 (so 91%), if you're coursework is mid A then you'll need more like 95% (more like 103 or 4), I'd reckon. I could work it out properly if I knew your exact mark in each coursework componenent, but that should give you a rough idea.

    Lit coursework is only worth 30% not 40% and with a high A I'd say you'd need about 92%. Because the grade boundaries are usually around 90% and sometimes lower, with your coursework you'll need slightly more.

    Those are only rough estimates though
    Great
    I'll give up Language (doesn't sound good lol :p: ) and aim for an A... and put all the efforts in for Literature to get an A*
    I don't think I'll ever get anything higher than something like 90% in Language

    thanks
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    (Original post by zactissue)
    Great
    I'll give up Language (doesn't sound good lol :p: ) and aim for an A... and put all the efforts in for Literature to get an A*
    I don't think I'll ever get anything higher than something like 90% in Language

    thanks
    That's a shame.. good luck anyway You may surprise yourself! And Lit is better anyway :yes:
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    (Original post by BookWormShanti)
    That's a shame.. good luck anyway You may surprise yourself! And Lit is better anyway :yes:
    Thanks good luck to you too!
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    Honestly, I think I need to get a revision schedule in plan now...
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    Can someone tell me what grades these will be for English Language plz and any tips...thanx[

    U]Describe your home
    [/U]My small emerald island. A rather minute island but an island within its own right.
    The rooms: extensions of some green-covered hills parading their beauty with the upmost pride. Within them, every bed is a nest, a cave to shelter every sort of wondrous creature that has stepped its foot on this earth. They rest there carelessly, snoring their dreams until every room is a magnificent creation of their minds where waterfalls flow beside the window, where the sun -hanging from the roof- throws its rays in every corner declaring a new day, a new beginning!
    My room. Well, I wouldn’t say mine alone. I share it with lots of people and things. I share it with every person I’ve ever loved, with every memory that gains entry into my mind, with every dream, with every imagination...Every afternoon, having left the restraining walls of schools, I set foot into my universe and a whole world unravels. Not our world. Not the world encapsulated in the shell of reality. My own world.
    The kitchen: a room where I cook up my life. In the sink, I wash away the dirt from every painful moment, clean it out with water and leave it to dry. Learn from my mistakes. I don’t need to use the bin. I like to keep everything even if it is rotting with age. They all mean something. They all fill a gap in the timeline. The knives, forks and spoons are dancing in assonance, cropping and mushing to create a picturesque collage.
    It’s my universe. A 3-bedroom, 2-reception universe. It’s where I get to be me without the makeup.



    Childhood memories can be very important. Choose one childhood memory. Describe the memory and explain its importance to you.
    OPEN THE DOOR! Don’t you know who I am? I’m her sister. Don’t ask any more questions. Open for goodness’ sake.
    Waiting for someone to finish their exam can be the drabbest experience; it was exactly that for me! It wasn’t just that it was a 2-hour long exam; it was that there was a 5-year old child waiting anxiously in front of the door with their mother tugging tightly at their hand to keep them still. I just couldn’t do it anymore. My feet were jumping in their own world, my hands engaged in a battle with my mum and my mind begged for even 1 meter closer to the door. Would I dare?
    I did...
    Jumping hurdles and racing through mazes, I battled my way through the room. It didn’t matter that there were answer sheets flying in every corner now or that shrieks of anguish were stabbing at my face. I got there. That’s all that mattered. And I got a good welcome too. A warm hug and a sweet smile that put everything straight. That’s all I wanted and I got it even if I did have to storm into a room full of 30 or so complete strangers-rather angry too-. It was five minutes before the end of the exam and my sister got the motivation she needed. Having done my deed, it was time for me to go out and I did.
    Not only did this mean that from this moment onwards, every room that was forbidden was locked carefully twice and thrice, but also that there was now a loving bond between me and my sister; we would be bound to each other as long as that memory lived in our thoughts. Now we are more than sisters that happened to come from the same womb. We’re best friends. Why? Because I proved to my sister that my love for her exceeds any boundary of a wooden door. It exceeds every rule the world can place to restrict us.
    It’s not just that. After the disciplining I got from the invidulator and my mum once we were home, I never had the courage to step into a room with a closed door again. Instead I knock! I knock three times, wait for permission then walk in cautiously. I do it everywhere. And I have the best excuse too: it’s polite...
    OPEN THE DOOR...After I knock!
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    brilliant thread - I'm not revising yet, got to get science coursework out of the way first. subscribed
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    Here is some note on the 'Roaring Twenties' (AQA History). Sorry if it doesn't help...

    I made it myself
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: doc The Roaring Twenties..doc (81.5 KB, 358 views)
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    (Original post by rae_)
    Here is some note on the 'Roaring Twenties' (AQA History). Sorry if it doesn't help...

    I made it myself
    That must have taken you years to do....thanx a lot anyway; I have my own notes (handwritten) but it's always good to have more resources!

    Ohhh, by the way, have you finished revising the whole of the history spec (I assume u're doing WJEC)? I've revised the 2 in depth studies.

    I just noticed right now that u're actually doing AQA....excuse me!!!!
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    I found a good way to organise your revision is to write all the topics you need to revise on a separate post-it note and stick it on a wall in your room. Once you have revised that topic, move it to another wall. Set at time limit e.g 2 weeks to clear the wall. If you do a past paper in that subject write your score on the back of the post-it, next time you visit this topic see if you can beat this score. Once the wall is clear set a new date and revise them all again! Sounds dull but it's a good visual way to see what your getting done!
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    (Original post by bsblitter)
    That must have taken you years to do....thanx a lot anyway; I have my own notes (handwritten) but it's always good to have more resources!

    Ohhh, by the way, have you finished revising the whole of the history spec (I assume u're doing WJEC)? I've revised the 2 in depth studies.

    I just noticed right now that u're actually doing AQA....excuse me!!!!
    Your welcome

    I guess the exam boards' are quite similar. What are you studying?

    Regarding your english descriptive writing, I believe your telling more of an story rather than describing i.e imagine your a super camera that you see, touch, smell, taste and hear things, but hey I could be wrong since I suck at English
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    (Original post by rae_)
    Your welcome

    I guess the exam boards' are quite similar. What are you studying?

    Regarding your english descriptive writing, I believe your telling more of an story rather than describing i.e imagine your a super camera that you see, touch, smell, taste and hear things, but hey I could be wrong since I suck at English
    Yh, I think they're quite similar. I'm doing the roaring twenties, Germany (1929-1947) and USA (1929-2000).

    Thanks for the feedback on the writing, u're actually the only person to have commented on that considering I also posted it on another 2 forums...I really struggle with English too!
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    (Original post by bsblitter)
    Yh, I think they're quite similar. I'm doing the roaring twenties, Germany (1929-1947) and USA (1929-2000).

    Thanks for the feedback on the writing, u're actually the only person to have commented on that considering I also posted it on another 2 forums...I really struggle with English too!
    This might be a bit greedy of me, but can u read this one as well plz....

    Describe a journey by plane, train, bus or car. (27 marks)
    I was steps away from another universe, my dream universe. I went into the plane with more hope that a human heart can withstand. Exhausted by the troubles of the year and worn down like a coin bitten by age, I set foot into the plane desperate for a refresh. It wouldn’t be a normal refresh, it’s one that’ll keep me going for an entire year and I couldn’t wait!
    The universe I left behind gave the same frown it gave every time the sun rose, it’s final frown. As I entered the plane, I tried to forget its gloomy face that disturbed me in every step, tried to forget the painful past that I spent in its cold arms, tried to forget what I left behind. The plane was my path to a new beginning and I would enjoy it. Even though the trails of my old life tried to cling on still to its wings, my saviours, I wouldn’t let them get to me!
    I savoured every moment and every aspect of the plane journey even down to the nuts that I bit into slowly stimulating every taste bud before they approached my wet mouth. I would remember those moments for years to come, as long as I lived. The nuts weren’t themselves. They were a fantasy I lived with; with every bite would come a smiling thought, a creation of my imagining mind. When I broke the shell of the nut, really I was breaking the shell of my old, encapsulating life to give way to new-born hope.
    When they clapped for the pilot, I clapped for him a million times, with all my heart; I applauded the person who had grabbed me out of the engulfing waves and for which, I would remember for the rest of my life. A tear or two will never be enough to repay him who saved me. Now, I can breathe. The rope that wrapped its hands around my neck loosened its grip and I was free!
    The moment I knew I had reached the bay of safety. The moment I anticipated. The gush of wind that took me into its extensive arms as I stepped out of the air-conditioned plane. The warmth that surrounded me despite the dark night sky. It’s the moment never to be forgotten...
    The holiday starts now.
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    (Original post by bsblitter)
    This might be a bit greedy of me, but can u read this one as well plz....

    Describe a journey by plane, train, bus or car. (27 marks)
    I was steps away from another universe, my dream universe. I went into the plane with more hope that a human heart can withstand. Exhausted by the troubles of the year and worn down like a coin bitten by age, I set foot into the plane desperate for a refresh. It wouldn’t be a normal refresh, it’s one that’ll keep me going for an entire year and I couldn’t wait!
    The universe I left behind gave the same frown it gave every time the sun rose, it’s final frown. As I entered the plane, I tried to forget its gloomy face that disturbed me in every step, tried to forget the painful past that I spent in its cold arms, tried to forget what I left behind. The plane was my path to a new beginning and I would enjoy it. Even though the trails of my old life tried to cling on still to its wings, my saviours, I wouldn’t let them get to me!
    I savoured every moment and every aspect of the plane journey even down to the nuts that I bit into slowly stimulating every taste bud before they approached my wet mouth. I would remember those moments for years to come, as long as I lived. The nuts weren’t themselves. They were a fantasy I lived with; with every bite would come a smiling thought, a creation of my imagining mind. When I broke the shell of the nut, really I was breaking the shell of my old, encapsulating life to give way to new-born hope.
    When they clapped for the pilot, I clapped for him a million times, with all my heart; I applauded the person who had grabbed me out of the engulfing waves and for which, I would remember for the rest of my life. A tear or two will never be enough to repay him who saved me. Now, I can breathe. The rope that wrapped its hands around my neck loosened its grip and I was free!
    The moment I knew I had reached the bay of safety. The moment I anticipated. The gush of wind that took me into its extensive arms as I stepped out of the air-conditioned plane. The warmth that surrounded me despite the dark night sky. It’s the moment never to be forgotten...
    The holiday starts now.
    It's quite good but you can write a lot more in the advised 45 minutes you spend.
    You have some very interesting and unusual imagery which is sure to catch the examiner's eye but you still seem to tell a story rather than describe, try to use the 'show not tell' method and use more descriptive devices to paint a picture in the examiners head. Also try to use a range of sentence structures and shape you writing using punctuation. The use of the exclaimation mark in your piece may seem extensive, try to use more of an range like a semi colon which is highly regarded by examiners if you use it properly.

    Not the best advice but yeah...
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    (Original post by rae_)
    It's quite good but you can write a lot more in the advised 45 minutes you spend.
    You have some very interesting and unusual imagery which is sure to catch the examiner's eye but you still seem to tell a story rather than describe, try to use the 'show not tell' method and use more descriptive devices to paint a picture in the examiners head. Also try to use a range of sentence structures and shape you writing using punctuation. The use of the exclaimation mark in your piece may seem extensive, try to use more of an range like a semi colon which is highly regarded by examiners if you use it properly.

    Not the best advice but yeah...
    Thanx so much...Yh, I kind of got lazy and spent about 30 minutes on it...Thanks so much for the advice; I actually think it's great
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    (Original post by BookWormShanti)
    Each mark you get in the Language exam is worth 3x each mark in your coursework. For an A* in the exam you need 98/108 (so 91%), if you're coursework is mid A then you'll need more like 95% (more like 103 or 4), I'd reckon. I could work it out properly if I knew your exact mark in each coursework componenent, but that should give you a rough idea.

    Lit coursework is only worth 30% not 40% and with a high A I'd say you'd need about 92%. Because the grade boundaries are usually around 90% and sometimes lower, with your coursework you'll need slightly more.

    Those are only rough estimates though
    What about speaking and listening mark for Eng lang, how much do they count ? (I'm doing AQA)

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Updated: January 26, 2014
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