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AQA ELLA 3 comparative analysis. Help!!!

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    I'm currently doing an A2 English Language and Literature course for which my examining board is AQA (ELLA 3). I am completely stuck on comparative analysis and despite numerous contacts with my tutor (the course is distance learning that I take alongside FT work) I have received no extra help or information regarding my queries.

    My problem is that, although I can do the question, I can never make it past a B, and I have to get a, very, comfortable A in my summer exam. The comparative analysis part of the exam is worth 45 marks out of the overall 60 so it is imperative I get this right. I've asked my tutor if he could give me examples of A grade work, to which he replied no, and just told me to look at mark schemes. However, I have done these before and, for some reason, I just can't seem to understand what they are asking for!

    Is anyone else in the same position, or can anyone offer me help regarding the comparative analysis? I am feeling horribly frustrated with my tutor because he is supposed to be there to help but isn't answering any of my questions
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    (Original post by torilou10)
    I'm currently doing an A2 English Language and Literature course for which my examining board is AQA (ELLA 3). I am completely stuck on comparative analysis and despite numerous contacts with my tutor (the course is distance learning that I take alongside FT work) I have received no extra help or information regarding my queries.

    My problem is that, although I can do the question, I can never make it past a B, and I have to get a, very, comfortable A in my summer exam. The comparative analysis part of the exam is worth 45 marks out of the overall 60 so it is imperative I get this right. I've asked my tutor if he could give me examples of A grade work, to which he replied no, and just told me to look at mark schemes. However, I have done these before and, for some reason, I just can't seem to understand what they are asking for!

    Is anyone else in the same position, or can anyone offer me help regarding the comparative analysis? I am feeling horribly frustrated with my tutor because he is supposed to be there to help but isn't answering any of my questions
    Hi there,

    I'm taking ELLA3 in June, and I agree it is very hard. I need a low A on it to get an A overall at A Level, despite getting A's on both my ELLA 1 and 2 last year.

    I think getting the introduction right is very important. Are you taught the CAMPLGSS scheme? If not, then I will definitely tell you about that as it is the advised way to structure your essay.

    I think why most people don't get an A overall is because they do not make comparisons between the texts. All the way through, you must be comparing and comparing and COMPARING.
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    (Original post by beth_simpz)
    Hi there,

    I'm taking ELLA3 in June, and I agree it is very hard. I need a low A on it to get an A overall at A Level, despite getting A's on both my ELLA 1 and 2 last year.

    I think getting the introduction right is very important. Are you taught the CAMPLGSS scheme? If not, then I will definitely tell you about that as it is the advised way to structure your essay.

    I think why most people don't get an A overall is because they do not make comparisons between the texts. All the way through, you must be comparing and comparing and COMPARING.
    Hi

    Thanks for your reply. No, I don't know this scheme, so that would be a great help!

    My tutor actually said to me the other day 'I'm at a loss as to what I can tell you beyond this' when I asked for more help!

    Thanks
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    Can you explain the CAMPGLSS scheme as I am trying to help a young friend do this essay and she needs a good system to follow.
    Also, do you know how the marks are worked out so that you know what you have to get to achieve an overall A at A2.
    Thanks a lot
    B
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    (Original post by beth_simpz)
    Hi there,

    I'm taking ELLA3 in June, and I agree it is very hard. I need a low A on it to get an A overall at A Level, despite getting A's on both my ELLA 1 and 2 last year.

    I think getting the introduction right is very important. Are you taught the CAMPLGSS scheme? If not, then I will definitely tell you about that as it is the advised way to structure your essay.

    I think why most people don't get an A overall is because they do not make comparisons between the texts. All the way through, you must be comparing and comparing and COMPARING.
    Hi, what's the CAMPLGSS scheme please?
    I'm really struggling with ELLA3
    How do you get the introduction right?
    I thought comparing was only 15 marks, and 45 are for analysing.
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    (Original post by blabla321)
    Hi, what's the CAMPLGSS scheme please?
    I'm really struggling with ELLA3
    How do you get the introduction right?
    I thought comparing was only 15 marks, and 45 are for analysing.
    Ok, so the CAMPLGSS scheme is the advised way to structure your essay. You can answer it in a thematic approach, and if the question lends itself to that then it is easier, however following the CAMPLGSS section is guaranteed to make sure you hit all sections of the mark scheme.

    The Introduction- CAMP (Context, Audience, Mode, Purpose).

    This should be no more than half a page, and is just you introducing all the texts.

    The main body of your essay- LGSS (Lexis, Grammar, Structure, Speech Features)

    This is where you will be making all of your comparisons. Where a lot of students lose their marks, is for just analysing the three texts separately, and making somewhat broad/sweeping statements in regards to comparing the texts.

    If you need any more info you can private message me, it is a hard paper :/
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    The comparative piece is so hard compared to recasting! I need top marks just to secure a C, my teachers royally messed me about with my coursework grade. It's so low, I need to do good in this exam to resurrect my entire A Level. Too much pressure.

    A bit old school, but I've just been taught the PEE approach for most of A2. However, you need to add in the effects of it - It's all very well pointing out a feature, but that won't get you far because in effect, you're just making an observation.

    My head of English told me to get into the top band, you need to think outside the box, expand your answers and be creative with your ideas. After all, it's English, you can make any point as long as you have the evidence to back it up.

    I don't know if this much use, but that's what I've been told. My teacher focused more on his stories rather than the actual syllabus!
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    (Original post by beth_simpz)
    Ok, so the CAMPLGSS scheme is the advised way to structure your essay. You can answer it in a thematic approach, and if the question lends itself to that then it is easier, however following the CAMPLGSS section is guaranteed to make sure you hit all sections of the mark scheme.

    The Introduction- CAMP (Context, Audience, Mode, Purpose).

    This should be no more than half a page, and is just you introducing all the texts.

    The main body of your essay- LGSS (Lexis, Grammar, Structure, Speech Features)

    This is where you will be making all of your comparisons. Where a lot of students lose their marks, is for just analysing the three texts separately, and making somewhat broad/sweeping statements in regards to comparing the texts.

    If you need any more info you can private message me, it is a hard paper :/
    Hi, this structure is very useful! Could I just ask, for the main body of the essay (LGSS) how could do you carry on your structure to keep comparing all three texts. For me i would usually write one paragraph for one text etc. But this is bad for me as I run out of time and don't get the chance to finish my paragraph on the last text. Therefore a structure like this would help as i'd get to write about each text throughout my essay.. would it be good to do a paragraph comparing language in all three texts, then another for Grammar, Structure and Speech Features - still comparing all three texts.
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    This is the structure I'm using. I know there are a lot of paragraphs but It's more broken down.
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: docx ELLA 3.docx (11.6 KB, 1127 views)
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    that's similar to the structure i have been taught. But i never finish on time
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    (Original post by lalala1)
    that's similar to the structure i have been taught. But i never finish on time
    What i'm doing now is just pre-writing general sentences and memorizing them so you don't waste time on thinking.
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    (Original post by HKDSP)
    What i'm doing now is just pre-writing general sentences and memorizing them so you don't waste time on thinking.
    Setences like what? Do you mean like the opening of a paragraph? How are you revising for this exam?
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    Just like general comparative sentences that you can apply in the exam. The introduction is easy to pre-write since you will always have to say that they are linked by their topic. So I pre writed something like -

    A comparable link between the three texts is the way in which (Topic) is presented. However, It should be pointed out that the topic agenda is dealt with in a differing way. Text A is an extract from a novel/non-literary/spontaneous speech which therefore shows that it's mode was intended/ not intended to be temporary. etc etc
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    Hello all I'm really worried about this exam - I have spent all my time revising for my other exams and only now am able to look over my English. I'm the original poster - doing it through distance learning and, as I 'officially' finished my course at thee beginning of last month, no longer receive 'help' from my tutor (as if I received much in the first place!).

    Does any have a list of terms that relate to each section of the exam? As I mentioned, I struggle with comparative analysis the most and really need all the help I can get. I really, really, really can't get my head around this. My work is never good enough and I really need to secure a B in this exam (and, because I am doing it distance learning, my coursework has been sent off to be marked and wont find out the grade until August along with the one for this so can't work out what I need to get in this exam). I am ok with the text adaptation but have weaknesses there also - mainly the commentary. Any notes/advice would be so, so helpful and much appreciated.

    Thank you
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    Hiya, I'm doing the ELLA3 exam on Friday aswell

    It took me ages to get into the swing of how to get good marks on these essays but it is easier than you think.

    In the introduction you need to establish a hanger which you can relate back to throughout the essay. For example, "all three texts talk about the opression of humans." When you use the PEEL structure the "L" will you be relating back to your hanger.

    Also, use this structure for the entire essay. It really doesn't have to be that long.
    -introduction
    -Text A compared to text B (A+B)
    -Text B compared to text C (B+C)
    -Text C compared to text A (A+C)
    -Conclusion.

    It's not about how well you can explain the effect of a point on it's own, it's how well you compare them BETWEEN THE TEXTS it will be fine, think about all the techniques there are to talk about.
    xx
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    What is the PEEL structure? Sorry, I know I sound like an idiot! Panicking because I have no time left


    (Original post by CharleyC92)
    Hiya, I'm doing the ELLA3 exam on Friday aswell

    It took me ages to get into the swing of how to get good marks on these essays but it is easier than you think.

    In the introduction you need to establish a hanger which you can relate back to throughout the essay. For example, "all three texts talk about the opression of humans." When you use the PEEL structure the "L" will you be relating back to your hanger.

    Also, use this structure for the entire essay. It really doesn't have to be that long.
    -introduction
    -Text A compared to text B (A+B)
    -Text B compared to text C (B+C)
    -Text C compared to text A (A+C)
    -Conclusion.

    It's not about how well you can explain the effect of a point on it's own, it's how well you compare them BETWEEN THE TEXTS it will be fine, think about all the techniques there are to talk about.
    xx
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    (Original post by CharleyC92)
    Hiya, I'm doing the ELLA3 exam on Friday aswell

    It took me ages to get into the swing of how to get good marks on these essays but it is easier than you think.

    In the introduction you need to establish a hanger which you can relate back to throughout the essay. For example, "all three texts talk about the opression of humans." When you use the PEEL structure the "L" will you be relating back to your hanger.

    Also, use this structure for the entire essay. It really doesn't have to be that long.
    -introduction
    -Text A compared to text B (A+B)
    -Text B compared to text C (B+C)
    -Text C compared to text A (A+C)
    -Conclusion.

    It's not about how well you can explain the effect of a point on it's own, it's how well you compare them BETWEEN THE TEXTS it will be fine, think about all the techniques there are to talk about.
    xx
    Using that structure how do you cover genre, audience, purpose, context, language features etc etc... ??
    thanks
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    P- point
    E-evidence
    E-explain
    L- link

    I don't know if it's just specific teachers but my teacher always talks to us about the importance of tone. So for my introductions I would write,

    Text A is a poem by Keats on Autum, the poem has a sombre tone which is shown through the use of the semantic field of death. Whereas text B....

    Or, each paragrah only talks about 2 specific teachniques. So You could say "The standardised structure of the poem reflects the writers own personal attitudes of hatred towards (blah.)" This way you get to talk about structure and then you can use specifc lexical choices to elaborate on the points you've made, "this is espically evident as the writer uses vocabulary such as..." But you must always ALWAYS remember to compare it to another text straight away. Our class got told there is no use writing whole paragraphs about just one text as it doesn't get you any comparison marks, it's just better not to waste your time.

    I used to hate planning the answers for these questions, but i've found that since i started using the first half an hour to just analyse the texts to find similarities or differences it's much easier to make your essay flow.

    xx
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    (Original post by CharleyC92)
    P- point
    E-evidence
    E-explain
    L- link

    I don't know if it's just specific teachers but my teacher always talks to us about the importance of tone. So for my introductions I would write,

    Text A is a poem by Keats on Autum, the poem has a sombre tone which is shown through the use of the semantic field of death. Whereas text B....

    Or, each paragrah only talks about 2 specific teachniques. So You could say "The standardised structure of the poem reflects the writers own personal attitudes of hatred towards (blah.)" This way you get to talk about structure and then you can use specifc lexical choices to elaborate on the points you've made, "this is espically evident as the writer uses vocabulary such as..." But you must always ALWAYS remember to compare it to another text straight away. Our class got told there is no use writing whole paragraphs about just one text as it doesn't get you any comparison marks, it's just better not to waste your time.

    I used to hate planning the answers for these questions, but i've found that since i started using the first half an hour to just analyse the texts to find similarities or differences it's much easier to make your essay flow.

    xx

    Morning Thanks for your reply. This sounds really cheeky but I wondered if you could give me an example including comparisons? For some reason I still can't get it! I think I may have said above, my problem isn't necessary picking out bits but explaining why they have been used and, of course, that's really important!
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    Okie doke, here is a paragraph i wrote from an ELLA3 practise around a month ago.

    "Both texts A and B depict mining as a cruel and laborious occupation. Text A uses an interesting piece of visual imagery with the phrase "The miner at the rock face stands." This conjures imagery of being trapped or suggests desperation for escape. This is reiterated further when the miners hands are described as "segged and bleeding." The connotations of pain and suffering convey the hellish nature of the job. These two images combined show the cruelty and laborious nature of mining. In text B Orwell uses similar descriptive methods. He mentions "buttons down the back" which we are then told are "permanent scabs" the miners have. The lexical choice of "scab" is basic and crude in nature. It de-glamorises any pre-conceived notions the reader may have and conveys the stripped back nature of mining evident in text A. The definitive use of "permanent" also reminds the reader of the damage and pain caused by mining. Together, a real sense of the sympathy is portrayed from Nicholson and Orwell as the miners pains are described so explicitly. The solemn and downtrodden tone is also evident through phrases such as "unbearable agony" or "they dig for death." This shows how the two writers believe that contrary to the popular notion of "digging for treasure" in the real world, miners only uncover more suffering.”

    xxxx
    let me know what you think btw, or if you want some more examples, we got made to do an ELLA3 practise everyweek so i've got loads

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