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Muslims all over world come out in support of bin Laden

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    Istanbul:





    Cairo:

    All of us are Bin Laden it says:







    Pakistan:







    Kashmir:



    Indonesia:





    Your opinion?
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    It will motivate Al Qaeda to act against what has happened. There's not much to be said here apart from this was to be expected given the way that the US operation was carried out and the way in which Osama met his demise.
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    (Original post by dzeh)
    No point calling these muslim extremists. all muslims are extreme crackers
    You do know crackers is an insult against white people?
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    Still a minority. And it was expected anyway.
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    (Original post by Ferrero Rocher)
    Still a minority. And it was expected anyway.
    Demonstrations are always a 'minority'. Just like the student demonstrations in London was the minority. Not all students came out, but still. It says something. I believe his popularity went up after his death.
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    inb4 'They're not Muslims!!!!!!'

    :rolleyes:
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    proving yet again that the whole religion is an utter joke

    ... infact, expand that to all religions, the world would be a much more peaceful place without relgion
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    (Original post by GEN.)
    You do know crackers is an insult against white people?
    what do you mean.......white people.:mad::confused:
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    More ray guns
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    (Original post by GEN.)
    You do know crackers is an insult against white people?
    hardly an insult tbh
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    (Original post by consumed by stuff)
    what do you mean.......white people.:mad::confused:
    Crackers in the US is used like the N word against black people.
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    Funny, how you will ignore the 15,000 people who came out to protest against extremism in Kabul but then you will focus on several hundred that come out to protest for Bin Laden.



    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011...ban-peace-deal



    Thousands of Afghans have attended a heated rally in Kabul decrying peace talks with the Taliban in a show of strength by those opposing any return to power of the hardline movement.

    Crowds carrying green flags and wearing ribbons of the newly established National Movement gathered under a vast series of tented canopies in the capital days after the event was called on Monday – the same day that news broke that Osama bin Laden had been killed by US special forces in Pakistan.

    The killing of the man who was sheltered by the Taliban regime in the 1990s has prompted heady speculation that an "end game" to the 10-year conflict could now be at hand, with the Afghan government under President Hamid Karzai and the Taliban-led insurgency striking a deal.

    But "deal making" were dirty words to the crowd gathered at the rally in Kabul on Thursday morning. Banners lining the tent said "We didn't vote for Karzai to make deals," and "Don't sacrifice justice for dealing."

    Speeches were interrupted several times by chants from the crowd of "Death to the Taliban. Death to the suicide bombers. Death to the Punjabis" – a reference to the demonstrators' view that the Taliban is under the control of Pakistan's spy service.

    The event was organised by Amrullah Saleh, the country's former spy chief and outspoken critic of Karzai's efforts to reach out to the Taliban.

    Saleh, a burly and comparatively young man who earned the respect of the CIA during his sometimes brutal leadership of Afghanistan's intelligence service, received a rapturous reception from the flag-waving crowd when he marched into the tent with a phalanx of bodyguards.

    Speaking to a crowd that organisers claimed, not unreasonably, was about 15,000 strong, Saleh said he had "for years" warned that al-Qaida and the Taliban were being protected in Pakistan, something that had been "proved" by the killing of Bin Laden in a Pakistani garrison town this week.

    Saleh said efforts to reach out to the Taliban ignored what he claimed was the vast majority of people who oppose the insurgents. And he expressed anger at Karzai's description of the Taliban as disaffected "brothers".

    "They are not my brother, they are not your brother – those are our enemies," he told the cheering crowd.

    Since being sacked by Karzai last year, Saleh has been developing a political profile for himself, travelling the northern regions of the country to warn people of Karzai's peace plans and recruit people to his cause.

    But Thursday's event, held outside a gaudy wedding hall on one of the city's busiest roads, appeared to be a deliberate effort by the party to burst on to the national scene as a force to be reckoned with.

    Unusually for a political rally in Afghanistan, the master of ceremonies was a woman, who welcomed the crowds and introduced the speakers.

    It appeared part of an effort to highlight the Taliban's harsh treatment of women, who during the Taliban government were restricted from education, employment and even venturing out of their homes without a male relative.

    Although aides to Saleh said he had been planning the event for the past two weeks, his rapid mobilisation of so many people since Monday highlighted one of the main pitfalls on the road to a possible negotiated peace with the Taliban – that it would not be accepted by many Afghans, particularly those who are not Pashtuns, the country's largest ethnic group.

    Some have even warned that a rapid peace deal could rekindle civil war in the country, particularly as the strongest opposition to a Taliban return to power comes from within the ranks of the Northern Alliance, the old coalition of largely non-Pashtun communities from the north of the country who fought bitterly against the Taliban takeover of the country in the 1990s.

    Saleh himself was an aide to Ahmed Shah Massoud, the leader of the Northern Alliance who was assassinated days before 9/11 on the orders of Bin Laden.

    Although Saleh described the anti-Taliban movement as a non-tribal group covering the whole nation, at the rally on Thursday the audience appeared to be disproportionately made up of northerners, with a heavy representation of burly men from Panjshir, a valley north of Kabul that resisted the Taliban, who were assisting with security and crowd control.

    Western diplomats have long warned that any political arrangement to bring the conflict to a close must not be, in the words of one, "a Pashtun-to-Pashtun stitch-up". But there is little sign that Karzai has succeeded in getting national buy-in for his peace plans.

    Last year the Afghan president hosted a national "peace jirga" designed to win a national mandate for pursuing peace plans. Unfortunately the event, which was boycotted by most of the leading non-Pashtun warlords and civil war leaders, was criticised by some for being unrepresentative.
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    (Original post by sh1519)
    proving yet again that the whole religion is an utter joke

    ... infact, expand that to all religions, the world would be a much more peaceful place without relgion
    No not really, they would just kill each other for different reasons. For example, Korean war wasn't about religion, nor was World War 1/2 about religion. Humans will always fight each other because they're different from one another be it religion, culture, colour, political ideology etc.
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    Guess who made him a martyr?
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    (Original post by DorianGrayism)
    Funny, how you will ignore the 15,000 people who came out to protest against extremism in Kabul but then you will focus on several hundred that come out to protest for Bin Laden.

    Thousands of Afghans have attended a heated rally in Kabul decrying peace talks with the Taliban in a show of strength by those opposing any return to power of the hardline movement.
    That's more of a secular thing though. The Afghan people are protesting specifically against the Taliban, who ruled Afghanistan with a cruel iron fist for a decade and made their lives hell, not against extremism in general.
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    (Original post by GEN.)
    Crackers in the US is used like the N word against black people.
    What do you mean..........black people.:mad::confused:
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    (Original post by DorianGrayism)
    Funny, how you will ignore the 15,000 people who came out to protest against extremism in Kabul but then you will focus on several hundred that come out to protest for Bin Laden.



    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011...ban-peace-deal




    Crowds carrying green flags and wearing ribbons of the newly established National Movement gathered under a vast series of tented canopies in the capital days after the event was called on Monday – the same day that news broke that Osama bin Laden had been killed by US special forces in Pakistan.



    Although Saleh described the anti-Taliban movement as a non-tribal group covering the whole nation, at the rally on Thursday the audience appeared to be disproportionately made up of northerners, with a heavy representation of burly men from Panjshir, a valley north of Kabul that resisted the Taliban, who were assisting with security and crowd control.
    First of all don't talk to me as if I'm the spokesperson of al-Qaeda, secondly that article shows you that:
    1: These people are supporters of one group.
    2. Most are Uzbekis (Northerners) who were fighting against the Taliban (who are Pashtuns, East and South East Afghanistan)

    This is probably the opinion of the Pashtuns:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJYPByK7AkA

    (Original post by pol pot noodles)
    That's more of a secular thing though. The Afghan people are protesting specifically against the Taliban, who ruled Afghanistan with a cruel iron fist for a decade and made their lives hell, not against extremism in general.
    They're not representing Afghanistan but only the Uzbeki Afghans (Northerners) who are anti-Taliban due to the Tribal system. I fully agree that Afghans do not want Taliban but as the US replaced the Taliban by ex-warlords, they're inclining to to support the Taliban which lead to the Taliban surge mid-2007
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    (Original post by Stratos)
    Guess who made him a martyr?
    Himself (Osama) Oops
    Obama
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    (Original post by GEN.)
    First of all don't talk to me as if I'm the spokesperson of al-Qaeda, secondly that article shows you that:
    1: These people are supporters of one group.
    2. Most are Uzbekis (Northerners) who were fighting against the Taliban (who are Pashtuns, East and South East Afghanistan)

    This is probably the opinion of the Pashtuns:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJYPByK7AkA



    They're not representing Afghanistan but only the Uzbeki Afghans (Northerners) who are anti-Taliban due to the Tribal system. I fully agree that Afghans do not want Taliban but as the US replaced the Taliban by ex-warlords, they're inclining to to support the Taliban which lead to the Taliban surge mid-2007
    I wasn't directing it at you. I was directing it mainly at the people who commented below you.

    Anyway, I didn't say it was representative. I said there were Muslims who are quite clearly against extremism. It was an example of a rally in which Muslim people were looking for freedom from tyranny.

    Also, even if you ignore that, polls show that most Afghans are against a return to Taliban rule.
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    (Original post by DorianGrayism)
    I wasn't directing it at you. I was directing it mainly at the people who commented below you.

    Anyway, I didn't say it was representative. I said there were Muslims who are quite clearly against extremism. It was an example of a rally in which Muslim people were looking for freedom from tyranny.

    Also, even if you ignore that, polls show that most Afghans are against a return to Taliban rule.
    Most Afghans are midway = want to get rid of the Taliban and Americans and their stooges. I mean even Abdullah Abdullah who's the biggest opposition figure in Afghanistan withdrew from the elections because he knew it was a waste of time...is this the democracy the Americans promised?

    Besides the article was about bin Laden not the Taliban.

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