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Law Applicants 2012

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    I'm going to study law at Queen Mary, University of London
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    http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode..._Down_the_Law/

    watch this
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    (Original post by Kidioteque)
    Mainly down to my pushiness of my school who are demanding a first draft by July 9th! Did you focus on a couple of specific legal areas of interest in yours? Or did you try to be more well-rounded/generic (strictly in terms of your legal interest)? I'd presume that the former would be better but I don't want to seem to have narrowed myself too much!
    Fwiw, I started my PS very late, finished it even later, I think I sent my application in in December... still got 5/5 and my grades weren't good enough for it to be based on that. So if your school hassle you for a draft tell them to go away, make sure its absolutely right before you finish it. As for legal areas, I barely talked about my interest at all, not sure why, definitely didn't have to go into depth about anything, didn't have enough word count for that. Applied for some Law + language course and talked about French a bit, so maybe that's why... Anyway, don't stress, keep writing and re-writing and it'll get there...
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    (Original post by silence18)
    I'm sorry if I didn't explain my point of view from the beginning. There are around 25 universities that ask for AAA or higher at A levels. From these universities, some of them also give AAB offers but I think they also give that offers to those who are predicted AAA. I might be wrong, though. With AAB one could, theoretically apply to some good unis such as Kent, East Anglia or City but unis such as Southampton, Bristol or Edinburgh give AAB/BBB offers for History which is a traditional, respected degree. Moreover, LSE asks for AAB for Social Anthropology/ Anthropology and Law.
    I think that every student's dream is to study at a prestigious institution. Some would like to do so because their peers are going to do it and want to be at the same level with them, for some maybe it is important to know that they have that prestigous name on their CVs, but the main reason one should want to study at an excellent institution is for the actual purpose of going to uni: to study a subject in depth. For that 9000 pounds or less one should expect to have the best academics, the best learning resources, the best amenities, the best career prospects, the best access to extracurricular activities, etc.
    If one is decided that he is really passionate about law, maybe there's no point in deciding to apply for something else just because of that. But unfortunately, many of those who apply are attracted by the legal profession(and the starting salaries& again prestige) much more than the study of law. I can see that we agree on the purpose of studying for a degree, Finbarr, you said that one should not study another subject for what it might lead to, what I'm trying to explain is that one should not read law just because what it might lead to!
    There are many who would like to study other subjects, but are forced by their parents or by others in going into law because you can do little with a degree in anthropolgy, for example.
    From what I've heard the GDL is incredibly hard but it covers all the 7 modules, so there is nothing essential that one could miss, just a lot of work to be done!
    In my experience you have hit the nail on the head with this comment. However, you are guaranteed not to have the same in-depth knowledge of the law; and additionally, you will not be able to study optional subjects that might lead to your particular legal niche (if you have one). I know two people so far who have dropped out of the GDL. Both went to top universities. Both found it too much. And of course, no one should be under the illusion that a GDL is anywhere near as thorough as an LLB. It's physically impossible to study 3 years worth in 9 months. However, another option, which a friend did, was a degree at a top uni, then a graduate LLB (or LLM QLD) which is two years and only covers the core subjects. This allows one the time to spend learning the subject in more depth. Just an alternative option for you.
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    (Original post by BessOsborne)
    Hi!

    I have just finished my law degree (Cambridge) and am going on to do an Msc in Criminal Justice. I have just started a new blog about academic life, and would really like to do a post on FAQs about law/university life etc. If anyone wouldn't mind helping out by posing a question (or even two...), I would be eternally grateful!!

    Bx
    I gather some law schools are very practical in their approaches, and others happier to have students explore more abstract ideas, principles, themes, narratives, and debates, around and touched by law. Where might Cambridge sit on this spectrum?

    Can you give some example essay and/or exam questions set which might indicate the scope of the writing one might be encouraged or allowed to engage in?
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    (Original post by Finbarr)
    Where might Cambridge sit on this spectrum??
    I've never studied Law at Cambridge and this question wasn't directed at me, but I'm gonna give my opinion anyway (thats what internet forums are for)

    I would expect that cambridge is quite high on the abstract ideas, principles, etc spectrum and quite low on the practical spectrum. Cambridge is pretty solid academically, to put it midly, and these things all have an air of academia about them.

    A solicitor told me the other day. "To become a solicitor you have to spend 3 years thinking and writing rubbish somewhere miles away from any solicitors and then once you've left uni you can start training to be a solicitor."
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    (Original post by mathsmusicfrench)
    I've never studied Law at Cambridge and this question wasn't directed at me, but I'm gonna give my opinion anyway (thats what internet forums are for)

    I would expect that cambridge is quite high on the abstract ideas, principles, etc spectrum and quite low on the practical spectrum. Cambridge is pretty solid academically, to put it midly, and these things all have an air of academia about them.

    A solicitor told me the other day. "To become a solicitor you have to spend 3 years thinking and writing rubbish somewhere miles away from any solicitors and then once you've left uni you can start training to be a solicitor."
    Fantastic quote from the solicitor, thanks also for your considering of my Q generally
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    Would anyone be willing to help me on a law question. Pm me
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    (Original post by ManPowa)
    Would anyone be willing to help me on a law question. Pm me
    Oh don't be so coy.
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    What's everyone doing over the summer, other than waiting for results?
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    Mostly being turned down for any job imaginable.

    That includes McDonalds u.u
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    Working! Luckily I work in Events and this is the season for festivals etc! Should earn me a good chunk of money ready for uni.

    I also have a pile of books relating to law to get through, I'd like to think I could have the basics memorised ready for the first term, I know they say that it's not necessary to have prior knowledge, but I'd like to have at least a base knowledge so that I don't feel overwhelmed to begin with.
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    (Original post by sasha165)
    What's everyone doing over the summer, other than waiting for results?
    Interning at a bank for 10 weeks, going to be so fun! (not) and will be going abroad for a while before I start + regular dreams of being in clearing on results day. Have you got anything planned?
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    (Original post by tabshiftspace)
    In my experience you have hit the nail on the head with this comment. However, you are guaranteed not to have the same in-depth knowledge of the law; and additionally, you will not be able to study optional subjects that might lead to your particular legal niche (if you have one). I know two people so far who have dropped out of the GDL. Both went to top universities. Both found it too much. And of course, no one should be under the illusion that a GDL is anywhere near as thorough as an LLB. It's physically impossible to study 3 years worth in 9 months. However, another option, which a friend did, was a degree at a top uni, then a graduate LLB (or LLM QLD) which is two years and only covers the core subjects. This allows one the time to spend learning the subject in more depth. Just an alternative option for you.
    I hope you do not mind me replying

    However the current intake for for TC and Pupillage is 50/50 GDL and Law Graduates. This information was given by the lawyers themselves.

    In fact I've met trainees and qualified solicitors who have come from GDL route. One told me that yes GDL is hard but no different from school years you have 30hrs of classes a week and exams at the end of each term.

    However I do get your point of it not being in debt in one year but most people have gone on vac schemes or work experience, during their degree so if you actively get involved i.e. Law Society during uni you will automatically build up depth and understanding. My point is the fact you get extra training following the degree proves doing one does not make you ready to practice it is a foundation for the career.

    I plan to do GDL and am encouraged that I will not drop out because it is what I want to do I will just apply the good old transferable skills from the History degree I intend to study. Lastly I've met current trainees which have study Philosophy, Psychology, History & English to name a few and are practising law as their profession obviously if you 100% on law go for it but it is not the guarantees route to a career in it. In fact a Law degree is seen as valuable degree for a lot of graduate schemes as it well respected by many employers.

    I know this was long I just thought I would share my own experience and what I've been told.
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    (Original post by hannah60000)
    I hope you do not mind me replying

    However the current intake for for TC and Pupillage is 50/50 GDL and Law Graduates. This information was given by the lawyers themselves.

    In fact I've met trainees and qualified solicitors who have come from GDL route. One told me that yes GDL is hard but no different from school years you have 30hrs of classes a week and exams at the end of each term.

    However I do get your point of it not being in debt in one year but most people have gone on vac schemes or work experience, during their degree so if you actively get involved i.e. Law Society during uni you will automatically build up depth and understanding. My point is the fact you get extra training following the degree proves doing one does not make you ready to practice it is a foundation for the career.

    I plan to do GDL and am encouraged that I will not drop out because it is what I want to do I will just apply the good old transferable skills from the History degree I intend to study. Lastly I've met current trainees which have study Philosophy, Psychology, History & English to name a few and are practising law as their profession obviously if you 100% on law go for it but it is not the guarantees route to a career in it. In fact a Law degree is seen as valuable degree for a lot of graduate schemes as it well respected by many employers.

    I know this was long I just thought I would share my own experience and what I've been told.
    That figure you quoted is only for a very small number of firms i.e the MC/SC firms, slightly less prestigious firms will probably have a higher intake of law graduates. IN MY OPINION, I do think some people have been slightly blinded by those figures, and now believe that a law degree is pointless or have some belief that they will just walk into a TC at a city firm as they plan to do a law conversion after university which I hear very often. The reason why you don't need a law degree is because half the stuff isn't relevant to the practise, If you're in a commercial firm, then I doubt you'd need much knowledge of criminal law in your day to day work.

    Out of interest, if you're already set on being a lawyer, what made you not decide to do Law at undergrad..a GDL is just a pointless and needless addition, if you've always wanted to be a lawyer. I find it easier to understand someone doing sciences/languages/Economics with the aim of converting since these subjects provide skills which are not present within law and are highly sought after, but I'm sure History will share many of the dull traits present in a law degree such as masses of reading.
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    (Original post by hannah60000)
    However the current intake for for TC and Pupillage is 50/50 GDL and Law Graduates. This information was given by the lawyers themselves.
    I cannot find any stats for pupillages but for training contracts in 2008/9 (the last year where stats are available free of charge) 72.7% of solicitors admitted after a training contract had a law degree.

    http://www.lawsociety.org.uk/secure/...2009report.pdf
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    (Original post by Tsunami2011)
    That figure you quoted is only for a very small number of firms i.e the MC/SC firms, slightly less prestigious firms will probably have a higher intake of law graduates. IN MY OPINION, I do think some people have been slightly blinded by those figures, and now believe that a law degree is pointless or have some belief that they will just walk into a TC at a city firm as they plan to do a law conversion after university which I hear very often. The reason why you don't need a law degree is because half the stuff isn't relevant to the practise, If you're in a commercial firm, then I doubt you'd need much knowledge of criminal law in your day to day work.

    Out of interest, if you're already set on being a lawyer, what made you not decide to do Law at undergrad..a GDL is just a pointless and needless addition, if you've always wanted to be a lawyer. I find it easier to understand someone doing sciences/languages/Economics with the aim of converting since these subjects provide skills which are not present within law and are highly sought after, but I'm sure History will share many of the dull traits present in a law degree such as masses of reading.

    Really???

    An Inner Temple Barrister told this (he himself original studied Philosophy then did conversion like 30 odd years ago and he is a Criminal Lawyer) to my pathways to law course I'm on also during my work experience at Eversheds (I know it is commercial firm - where I would like to end up personally as a solicitor if I purse my current goal) are they not prestigious :dontknow:

    Oh I have other interest and really love History and what a boarder scope so their I'm going to pursue this to be honest my mind is made up on my degree, however just like with many law students during the course of your degree minds do change but I would like that flexibility not saying a Law degree doesn't just more enthusiastic about History (PS it can be long but I like it ), I also rather enjoy Chemistry but I'm not pursing further education in it.

    I hope this answers you question
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    I cannot find any stats for pupillages but for training contracts in 2008/9 (the last year where stats are available free of charge) 72.7% of solicitors admitted after a training contract had a law degree.

    http://www.lawsociety.org.uk/secure/...2009report.pdf
    Well I went to the Inner Temple early this year, and the barrister himself said this and he had been there for 30yrs so I really do not know what to say to you sorry
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    (Original post by hannah60000)
    Well I went to the Inner Temple early this year, and the barrister himself said this and he had been there for 30yrs so I really do not know what to say to you sorry
    You don't have to apologise. You relied on the best information you had.
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    (Original post by hannah60000)
    Really???

    An Inner Temple Barrister told this (he himself original studied Philosophy then did conversion like 30 odd years ago and he is a Criminal Lawyer) to my pathways to law course I'm on also during my work experience at Eversheds (I know it is commercial firm - where I would like to end up personally as a solicitor if I purse my current goal) are they not prestigious :dontknow:

    Oh I have other interest and really love History and what a boarder scope so their I'm going to pursue this to be honest my mind is made up on my degree, however just like with many law students during the course of your degree minds do change but I would like that flexibility not saying a Law degree doesn't just more enthusiastic about History (PS it can be long but I like it ), I also rather enjoy Chemistry but I'm not pursing further education in it.

    I hope this answers you question
    I bet he studied Philosophy at Oxbridge Those are both very prestigious firms/chambers, I'm also sure Eversheds is SC (?) I meant just mid-sized city firms where the cost of funding the GDL is taken into consideration.

    Yeah, that answers my question I'm just glad that it's not because Law is too competitive which seems to often be the reason since most top law schools asking for A*AA-AAA.

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Updated: December 2, 2012
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