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    I don't generally feel a need to add that I'm not gay*, but I do point out that I'm not a chicken when discussing animal rights. It helps avoid confusion.

    *I'm also tall, handsome and great in bed. I can be contacted via PM.
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    (Original post by harr)
    I don't generally feel a need to add that I'm not gay*, but I do point out that I'm not a chicken when discussing animal rights. It helps avoid confusion.

    *I'm also tall, handsome and great in bed. I can be contacted via PM.
    I just noticed your (new?) sig.
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    I just noticed your (new?) sig.
    I changed it a couple of days ago.

    You don't seem to have heeded it though.

    On the subject of rights and taking heed:
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    (Original post by harr)
    I don't generally feel a need to add that I'm not gay*, but I do point out that I'm not a chicken when discussing animal rights. It helps avoid confusion.

    *I'm also tall, handsome and great in bed. I can be contacted via PM.
    According to psychological studies* it also makes a stronger argument if someone from outside a 'group' argues for someone inside the group, e.g. white people defending black rights in 1960 USA.


    *Reference: first year PPS course.
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    (Original post by harr)
    *I'm also tall, handsome and great in bed. I can be contacted via PM.
    :rofl:
    (Original post by The West Wing)
    *Reference: first year PPS course.
    :lol:
    I do that too often :p:
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    Woke up to find police swarming all over the riverbank just down from where we moor. Another body found in the river this morning, so close to my home, scary . http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/Home...m-29012012.htm
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    Grim
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    (Original post by Slumpy)
    The 'not gay' disclaimer is one I often put into conversation. Although, normally when there is a girl involved who I'd prefer to be aware that I'm available/straight...
    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    This, and the opposite - as to not mislead guys that might be gay themselves.
    Good point, totally didn't think of that! *sigh* I have clearly been out of the 'dating scene' too long, lol.
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    Straight men are very uneasy at being considered gay, even when they're in a relationship with women and everyone knows it. Speaking from a sociological viewpoint, the boundaries of masculinity are regulated tightly and strictly by society :p: There are reams and reams of literature remarking on it and analysing the reasons. However liberal people claim to be, or consciously see things, society still penalises homosexuality strictly which leaves most men with a subconscious need to demonstrate and assert straightness all the time.

    This is not to say that lesbians have an easier ride, but the penalties they face, and the way their sexuality is seen by society is very different. Some literature suggests that it isn't taken as seriously, or viewed as a threat in the way that gayness is. The experiences of some lesbian friends have backed this up. One reported many experiences where attracted men would either laugh at, or ignore her sexual orientation, implying that it wouldn't stop them 'having' her if they wanted to.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Straight men are very uneasy at being considered gay, even when they're in a relationship with women and everyone knows it. Speaking from a sociological viewpoint, the boundaries of masculinity are regulated tightly and strictly by society :p: There are reams and reams of literature remarking on it and analysing the reasons. However liberal people claim to be, or consciously see things, society still penalises homosexuality strictly which leaves most men with a subconscious need to demonstrate and assert straightness all the time.

    This is not to say that lesbians have an easier ride, but the penalties they face, and the way their sexuality is seen by society is very different. Some literature suggests that it isn't taken as seriously, or viewed as a threat in the way that gayness is. The experiences of some lesbian friends have backed this up. One reported many experiences where attracted men would either laugh at, or ignore her sexual orientation, implying that it wouldn't stop them 'having' her if they wanted to.
    In LP's defence, when he said what he said I did assume he was either female or gay. It's just still not the norm for straight guys to have gay rights as an absolute top priority. Even if the majority of people aren't prejudiced in the slightest.
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    (Original post by Gesar)
    In LP's defence, when he said what he said I did assume he was either female or gay. It's just still not the norm for straight guys to have gay rights as an absolute top priority. Even if the majority of people aren't prejudiced in the slightest.
    Guess me and Katie are spoilt in terms of lots of liberal company which affects our perception of how normal it is to support gay rights :sigh:

    Society is so depressing sometimes.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Guess me and Katie are spoilt in terms of lots of liberal company which affects our perception of how normal it is to support gay rights :sigh:
    To be fair, there's a difference between support, and support more (at least in terms of frequency) than any other issue.
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    (Original post by TheUnbeliever)
    To be fair, there's a difference between support, and support more (at least in terms of frequency) than any other issue.
    This, really. Although, saying that, I'm not sure I can think of anything on the spot that I find more of an issue in Britain(except perhaps the homeopathy spending..).
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Guess me and Katie are spoilt in terms of lots of liberal company which affects our perception of how normal it is to support gay rights :sigh:

    Society is so depressing sometimes.
    I think it is pretty normal to support gay rights, but it's just not a particularly common topic of discussion. :dontknow: That and I don't think they're very far off equal in the UK. Apart from not being able to call it a 'marriage' is there anything else that still needs to be done (in the legal sense)? Maybe the adoption rules are not equal but I don't know anything about this area.
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    (Original post by Gesar)
    In LP's defence, when he said what he said I did assume he was either female or gay. It's just still not the norm for straight guys to have gay rights as an absolute top priority. Even if the majority of people aren't prejudiced in the slightest.

    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Guess me and Katie are spoilt in terms of lots of liberal company which affects our perception of how normal it is to support gay rights :sigh:

    Society is so depressing sometimes.
    I think the thing is, the majority of people I've met who are vocal about gay rights are homosexual themselves so when you meet someone vocal about them, you make an assumption without thinking about it. It doesn't mean people don't support them. It's an unfortunate stereotype, I think. But when someone adds "I'm also not gay", I don't think people get particularly shocked about it, I think it's more "Oh, whoops, guess I was wrong, oh well."
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    I was just trying to make a quick joke and not cause too much of a stir... :P

    (Original post by Leipzig)
    Didn't read the Guardian piece (as most articles in that newspaper make my skin crawl, this excepted) but based on the BBC article, it sounds like the Anglican church is in a huge mess at the moment. I mean, don't they have openly gay ordained ministers already? I also fail to see how a legal definition of the term 'marriage' would have a direct impact on the religious ceremony. I'm pretty sure, for example, that you'd be hard pressed to get a Civil Union in a Catholic church, so I don't see why the CoE would be compelled to start conducting 'Gay Marriages' against its will... *shrug*

    Also, don't know why you need the "I'm not gay" disclaimer? Maybe I move in the wrong/alternative circles, but for some-one to be pro-gay marriage just means they're kinda progressive politically, not necessarily gay themselves.
    Yes, there are openly gay priests already - one local to me is not only out but was in the band the Communards in the 80s, is a BBC commentator and (most impressively) appeared on Celebrity Only Connect.

    I wanted to subtly signal that I probably didn't need the disclaimer at all but somehow felt compelled to add one. It doesn't help that I haven't really been involved in any kind of dating "scene" for a while, one of the choir said that their gaydar was screaming when they initially met me, and that my college wife crossed out all the options (single/taken/desperate etc.) on last year's RAG Blind Date form and wrote "asexual" instead - something I still haven't quite forgiven her for...

    (Original post by Slumpy)
    The 'not gay' disclaimer is one I often put into conversation. Although, normally when there is a girl involved who I'd prefer to be aware that I'm available/straight...
    It sounds too schlocky for me to do normally in conversation, though I don't really do enough (any) flirting to have had the need...

    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    This, and the opposite - as to not mislead guys that might be gay themselves.
    Indeed.

    (Original post by harr)
    I don't generally feel a need to add that I'm not gay*, but I do point out that I'm not a chicken when discussing animal rights. It helps avoid confusion.

    *I'm also tall, handsome and great in bed. I can be contacted via PM.
    PRSOM! I may have to steal that... (I do still worry there's a certain assumption when talking about gay rights though)

    (Original post by The West Wing)
    According to psychological studies* it also makes a stronger argument if someone from outside a 'group' argues for someone inside the group, e.g. white people defending black rights in 1960 USA.


    *Reference: first year PPS course.
    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Straight men are very uneasy at being considered gay, even when they're in a relationship with women and everyone knows it. Speaking from a sociological viewpoint, the boundaries of masculinity are regulated tightly and strictly by society :p: There are reams and reams of literature remarking on it and analysing the reasons. However liberal people claim to be, or consciously see things, society still penalises homosexuality strictly which leaves most men with a subconscious need to demonstrate and assert straightness all the time.

    This is not to say that lesbians have an easier ride, but the penalties they face, and the way their sexuality is seen by society is very different. Some literature suggests that it isn't taken as seriously, or viewed as a threat in the way that gayness is. The experiences of some lesbian friends have backed this up. One reported many experiences where attracted men would either laugh at, or ignore her sexual orientation, implying that it wouldn't stop them 'having' her if they wanted to.
    Especially as being gay and out is sufficiently frequent that people's minds do leap to it if you don't demonstrate masculinity in certain ways (why have I not seen him creepily drooling over girls, hmm?).

    (Original post by Gesar)
    In LP's defence, when he said what he said I did assume he was either female or gay. It's just still not the norm for straight guys to have gay rights as an absolute top priority. Even if the majority of people aren't prejudiced in the slightest.
    I've just spent too much time hearing about Rick ****ing Santorum, Prop 8 and the like in the States that I now find myself raging every time it comes into discussion. I'm not sure I'd say top priority (I'm not really sure what that is) but it's certainly something that's easy to shout about and which I find myself shouting about quite regularly.

    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Guess me and Katie are spoilt in terms of lots of liberal company which affects our perception of how normal it is to support gay rights :sigh:

    Society is so depressing sometimes.
    I have much the same, but I've recently become aware of quite how many CICCU members and StAG attendees I'm friends with, and I don't want to make assumptions that everyone thinks the way I do, especially when my thoughts on the matter are that dismissive!
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    (Original post by Slumpy)
    This, really. Although, saying that, I'm not sure I can think of anything on the spot that I find more of an issue in Britain(except perhaps the homeopathy spending..).
    It's just how many dumb stories I end up reading and then getting annoyed about rather than anything else. I also think it's a bit of a gimme - in my head I can find plenty of arguments for the welfare cuts and against getting out of Afghanistan as fast as our backsides can carry us, so I'm a bit more conflicted in arguing against welfare cuts and for leaving Afghanistan. I'm perhaps a bit pragmatic for that (also smart, funny and devilishly attractive, and also available for contact by PM, while I'm offhandedly saying flattering things about myself.)
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    (Original post by lp386)
    It's just how many dumb stories I end up reading and then getting annoyed about rather than anything else. I also think it's a bit of a gimme - in my head I can find plenty of arguments for the welfare cuts and against getting out of Afghanistan as fast as our backsides can carry us, so I'm a bit more conflicted in arguing against welfare cuts and for leaving Afghanistan. I'm perhaps a bit pragmatic for that (also smart, funny and devilishly attractive, and also available for contact by PM, while I'm offhandedly saying flattering things about myself.)
    On the other hand, you are an economist, so...
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    On the other hand, you are an economist, so...
    I'm used to telling implausible lies and expecting people to believe them unquestioningly, yes.
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    (Original post by lp386)
    I have much the same, but I've recently become aware of quite how many CICCU members and StAG attendees I'm friends with, and I don't want to make assumptions that everyone thinks the way I do, especially when my thoughts on the matter are that dismissive!
    My thoughts on the matter are dismissive enough that I don't care if CICCU or StAG people that I know get offended :p:
Updated: October 5, 2012
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