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    (Original post by ukebert)
    See I'm also constrained in that my girlfriend, most of my friends and a lot of my music stuff is in Cambridge and so I'd like to stay around for a few more years. And I absolutely do not want to go back home. So I feel trapped, with nowhere to go and horrible choices ahead. So all I want is a job, of pretty much any kind, as long as it pays OK I don't care. If I get a job then I have some time to try and sort out my life. But no luck so far.
    Yeah, that's crap and is why I'm thanking my lucky stars that my parents live in London. I always said I wouldn't move home after university, but they've offered to help me get started and it makes sense to be at home, where the jobs are. A lot of my friends who live in places where there aren't as many opportunities are actually going abroad next year rather than back home because it'll be easier for them to find a job and save money (usually teaching English). I hope you find something.

    Is there any way you could get some sort of job within the music industry that isn't directly related to music? My ex used to do the sound quite frequently at his dad's folk club (Twickfolk) and I think he got a bit of money for that, although it wouldn't have been a lot because he was 13-17 at the time and was also doing it for his dad. Obviously that might not be what you want to do, but if there are any vaguely related jobs in the industry that could be the way to go. It doesn't seem like there's a lot of money in folk clubs though

    Also, did you get the careers service leaflet in your pigeonhole today? I loved the little section for finalists, with the 'DON'T PANIC' and 'CAMBRIDGE GRADUATES ARE EMPLOYABLE' lines, as well as the reassurance that there are lots of companies coming to a careers event in June that still have jobs available. Of course, turning to look at what the careers event was revealed the sectors that these jobs are available in - Banking and Finance, Consultancy, Software.... All things I've already decided I don't want to do - if I did want to, I probably would have applied for the bazillion grad schemes that were open earlier in the year! :p:
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    (Original post by visesh)
    First (of many) post-finals exam on Tuesday, and I'm in no way prepared. Whoops.
    Hmm, that was a rather anti-climactic exam. I have no idea how I've done
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    I will hopefully FINALLY find out what's wrong with my heart tomorrow, so I guess in some way I'm looking forward to feeling conspicuous in cardiology.
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    (Original post by smilepea)
    I will hopefully FINALLY find out what's wrong with my heart tomorrow, so I guess in some way I'm looking forward to feeling conspicuous in cardiology.
    Best of luck for your appointment! Let me know when you've time to come round and have tea

    Oh, you'll be pleased to know that I've finally discovered Pottermore...no revision getting done here
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    (Original post by ebam_uk)
    Why not go back to basics, and monetise things like your blogs ( create guides of hypothetically how to make the instruments ie teach others your skills, perhaps consider starting to teach people & think creativeely ) ( create video blogs on youtube etc... get loads of traffic online...

    Before you know it your starting from somewhere, but obviously this is the whole route of a hobby leading to a career/ ( No reason why you can't hold a part time job/ whilst you develop your true passion/ career... Just think outside the box a bit lol!
    Aye and that is where my blog and so on is headed, but I can't imagine that it will ever get me much. I know my industry, the money is limited even for the top performers and much of it is bound up in albums and who knows where they will go in the future (what with the copyright stuff going up in smoke). So I can't rely on that and it's years off anyway.


    (Original post by Zoedotdot)
    Yeah, that's crap and is why I'm thanking my lucky stars that my parents live in London. I always said I wouldn't move home after university, but they've offered to help me get started and it makes sense to be at home, where the jobs are. A lot of my friends who live in places where there aren't as many opportunities are actually going abroad next year rather than back home because it'll be easier for them to find a job and save money (usually teaching English). I hope you find something.

    Is there any way you could get some sort of job within the music industry that isn't directly related to music? My ex used to do the sound quite frequently at his dad's folk club (Twickfolk) and I think he got a bit of money for that, although it wouldn't have been a lot because he was 13-17 at the time and was also doing it for his dad. Obviously that might not be what you want to do, but if there are any vaguely related jobs in the industry that could be the way to go. It doesn't seem like there's a lot of money in folk clubs though
    I want to play at Twickfolk! I sent them an email but they never replied Sad ukebert. One day I will. Snag is that I am not a soundman and likely never will be. I can tech a ceilidh band gig, badly, and I fear that is as far as I will go. And no, there is no money in folk clubs. The vast majority of them are run by volunteers and earn enough to keep going and those that don't are swamped by applicants. There is a degree in folk music up in Newcastle and all of their graduates are coming out with student loans looking for work in the industry. So any paid position is increasingly competitive and none are in Cambridge.

    Also, did you get the careers service leaflet in your pigeonhole today? I loved the little section for finalists, with the 'DON'T PANIC' and 'CAMBRIDGE GRADUATES ARE EMPLOYABLE' lines, as well as the reassurance that there are lots of companies coming to a careers event in June that still have jobs available. Of course, turning to look at what the careers event was revealed the sectors that these jobs are available in - Banking and Finance, Consultancy, Software.... All things I've already decided I don't want to do - if I did want to, I probably would have applied for the bazillion grad schemes that were open earlier in the year! :p:
    I didn't, but :ditto: to all that. I have a meeting with the careers service in 8.5 hours (better get to bed), hopefully that will help

    My main concern at the moment though is revision. My finals are in a week on Thursday and I know virtually none of the material. *sigh*
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    (Original post by visesh)
    Hmm, that was a rather anti-climactic exam. I have no idea how I've done
    You'll obviously be fine :p: Aren't you getting a bit old for all these exams, now, visesh?
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    I want to play at Twickfolk! I sent them an email but they never replied Sad ukebert. One day I will. Snag is that I am not a soundman and likely never will be. I can tech a ceilidh band gig, badly, and I fear that is as far as I will go. And no, there is no money in folk clubs. The vast majority of them are run by volunteers and earn enough to keep going and those that don't are swamped by applicants. There is a degree in folk music up in Newcastle and all of their graduates are coming out with student loans looking for work in the industry. So any paid position is increasingly competitive and none are in Cambridge.
    Next time I talk to my ex I'll mention you and send him one of your videos or something I don't know how much he still has to do with the folk club as he's doing sound techy things on the tour of Dreamboats and Petticoats at the moment, but his dad was always heavily involved with the running of it and I think he goes back when he's home so you never know... They always seemed to have good people playing there. One time I met Megson and I was completely starstruck :p:

    Just keep trying and you will break in eventually Even if you have to get a boring job on the side first. Have you considered volunteering at festivals? You could make some good contacts, and the festivals are really fun anyway (although you've probably played at them so you probably know that already!). I went to Shrewsbury one year and my ex went to Cambridge with his dad a few times. It's such a great world to be in - the atmosphere at Shrewsbury was so friendly and artsy, and it genuinely was one of my favourite weekends ever. I learnt how to do some sort of sword dancing as well which was great fun
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    If you PM me your email address I'll send you an article based on his book 'Kicking Away the Ladder' where he argues that OECD countries all nurtured their economy for a long time before they placed industries into the economy without any subsidy and protection. He argues that this allowed their industries to grow strong before they then competed on a global scale. By comparison, the IMF and World Bank have not allowed developing countries to use the same method, and to protect their industries before facing international competition. They are forced into competition on the global market that is unfavourable because they aren't allowed to set their own terms.
    Some people argue that the Asian economic success challenges this rule, but he shows that they only became very successful by breaking the rules that the IMF had laid out for them on the sly in how they operated economically.

    The IMF is constitutionally based around 70% control by Americans, and it is in their interest that it has dealt with the third world.
    The other really good thing to read is his book 'Bad Samaritans'.
    I finally got round to reading the article - unfortunately it didn't live up to expectations. All it seems to show is that developed countries used trade barriers to protect their industries during their development, and recently developing countries haven't developed quickly with relatively free trade. That doesn't necessarily mean that trade restrictions would be good for developing countries today. It does not even speculate at a possible causal link, leaving open the possibility that developed countries could have done better by not imposing the restrictions, and that developing countries would have been even worse off had their not pursued free trade strategies. I'm not saying that free trade is necessarily right for developing countries, but the article did not come close to convincing me that it was wrong.
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    I finally got round to reading the article - unfortunately it didn't live up to expectations. All it seems to show is that developed countries used trade barriers to protect their industries during their development, and recently developing countries haven't developed quickly with relatively free trade. That doesn't necessarily mean that trade restrictions would be good for developing countries today. It does not even speculate at a possible causal link, leaving open the possibility that developed countries could have done better by not imposing the restrictions, and that developing countries would have been even worse off had their not pursued free trade strategies. I'm not saying that free trade is necessarily right for developing countries, but the article did not come close to convincing me that it was wrong.
    Fair enough. I've not read the article, just the book 'Kicking Away the Ladder'. I thought the article condensed his main points, though. Sorry it didn't convince you :p:
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    You'll obviously be fine :p: Aren't you getting a bit old for all these exams, now, visesh?
    Haha I wish, on both accounts.

    This was part 1 of 2 exams for membership at the royal college of surgeons, and there is an 'exit exam' near the end of the training (i.e. in 8-9 years) for the fellowship. Then there are the very many courses with exams that need doing in order to progress. Add to that further membership exams if I plan to change my choice of specialty (not unlikely).

    Also, meh, I'm younger than you :p: :aetsch::ahhhhh:


    The major problems with all of these is the cost (at least £500 per attempt), the pass rate (<40%) and the fact that I have next to no time to actually revise for these.

    Ah well, I'm glad I've got this attempt out of the way for now though. It's now time to enjoy my free time and abuse my new car. :cool:
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    (Original post by Zoedotdot)
    Just keep trying and you will break in eventually Even if you have to get a boring job on the side first. Have you considered volunteering at festivals? You could make some good contacts, and the festivals are really fun anyway (although you've probably played at them so you probably know that already!). I went to Shrewsbury one year and my ex went to Cambridge with his dad a few times. It's such a great world to be in - the atmosphere at Shrewsbury was so friendly and artsy, and it genuinely was one of my favourite weekends ever. I learnt how to do some sort of sword dancing as well which was great fun
    Heh, been volunteering at Sidmouth for the last 4 years, this year teaching some of the youth workshops. And going to 4 festivals this year with various groups and dance sides. I love sword, going to try and do that next year if still in Cambridge.

    Not in a good place right now though. Only managed 2 hours work today and my exams are a week away. And it is possible that I could fail this year. It's like going back to Lent last year, I feel as bad as I did then. Starting to panic, which I don't do very often
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Fair enough. I've not read the article, just the book 'Kicking Away the Ladder'. I thought the article condensed his main points, though. Sorry it didn't convince you :p:
    Soc2?! L. King?!
    Revising that right now! Well actually not right now, it's midnight and I have a strict no work after 9pm rule :p:

    You don't by chance have any notes leftover do you?....All the other 3rd years I know all do politics. or did sociology but didn't take Soc2
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Fair enough. I've not read the article, just the book 'Kicking Away the Ladder'. I thought the article condensed his main points, though. Sorry it didn't convince you :p:
    No worries. I'll get round to reading the books when I get back to the UK.
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    I finally got round to reading the article - unfortunately it didn't live up to expectations. All it seems to show is that developed countries used trade barriers to protect their industries during their development, and recently developing countries haven't developed quickly with relatively free trade. That doesn't necessarily mean that trade restrictions would be good for developing countries today. It does not even speculate at a possible causal link, leaving open the possibility that developed countries could have done better by not imposing the restrictions, and that developing countries would have been even worse off had their not pursued free trade strategies. I'm not saying that free trade is necessarily right for developing countries, but the article did not come close to convincing me that it was wrong.
    That sounds dangerously close to the "no true Scotsman" fallacy. The comparison you are suggesting is impossible to carry out in real life: you can't rerun history and do things differently!
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    (Original post by Zhen Lin)
    That sounds dangerously close to the "no true Scotsman" fallacy. The comparison you are suggesting is impossible to carry out in real life: you can't rerun history and do things differently!
    A quick Wikipedia on the "No true Scotsman" fallacy and I can't immediately see how it applies. My main problem with the article was that it offers no causal mechanism, well actually no mechanism at all, to suggest that protectionism is beneficial for developing countries. All it does is show that currently developed countries used it while developing and developing countries didn't use it when not developing that quickly. As an economist it instead looks like a typical example of "correlation does not imply causation".
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    A quick Wikipedia on the "No true Scotsman" fallacy and I can't immediately see how it applies.
    I'm not talking about the paper (which I have not read), I'm talking about your criteria. It seems to me that whenever some economist is wrong, people just say, "oh, the theory doesn't apply to that situation", as if there were real-life situations to which theory could be applied! In that respect, I feel your criticism of the paper is misplaced: it gives the facts and leaves the reader to draw their own conclusions – the safest possible way to avoid an argument.
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    (Original post by Zhen Lin)
    I'm not talking about the paper (which I have not read), I'm talking about your criteria. It seems to me that whenever some economist is wrong, people just say, "oh, the theory doesn't apply to that situation", as if there were real-life situations to which theory could be applied! In that respect, I feel your criticism of the paper is misplaced: it gives the facts and leaves the reader to draw their own conclusions – the safest possible way to avoid an argument.
    I realised that, but my critique is that it offers no logical mechanisms whatsoever, but does in fact draw a conclusion (that developed countries are "kicking away the ladder") directly from the facts it presents (with no causal link between the facts and the conclusion).

    PS: In the spirit of asking random questions in CamChat, does anyone know of an effective way of dealing with an ant invasion? They're just small black ants which I think are coming through the large patio-style window/door thing I have in my bedroom but I'd like to stop them before they encroach too far into my apartment.
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    PS: In the spirit of asking random questions in CamChat, does anyone know of an effective way of dealing with an ant invasion? They're just small black ants which I think are coming through the large patio-style window/door thing I have in my bedroom but I'd like to stop them before they encroach too far into my apartment.
    I don't have anything useful to contribute but hopefully they're not Argentine ants.
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    I realised that, but my critique is that it offers no logical mechanisms whatsoever, but does in fact draw a conclusion (that developed countries are "kicking away the ladder") directly from the facts it presents (with no causal link between the facts and the conclusion).

    PS: In the spirit of asking random questions in CamChat, does anyone know of an effective way of dealing with an ant invasion? They're just small black ants which I think are coming through the large patio-style window/door thing I have in my bedroom but I'd like to stop them before they encroach too far into my apartment.
    Be careful not to leave any crumbs or spilled food. Make sure everything's sealed. And use insect spray. They might go away.
    (We had lots of ants in SA)
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    (Original post by ArchedEdge)
    Soc2?! L. King?!
    Revising that right now! Well actually not right now, it's midnight and I have a strict no work after 9pm rule :p:

    You don't by chance have any notes leftover do you?....All the other 3rd years I know all do politics. or did sociology but didn't take Soc2
    Huh? How do they get away with that? :confused: In my day all SOC students had to study SOC1 and SOC2. Unless they were Soc-Psych, and then they did SOC1 with a PSY paper.

    Anyway, yes it was SOC2, but unfortunately I can't help you. Not only was it my worst paper (only got 65 for it), but I also don't actually take or use notes. My 'notes' consist of typing up quotes directly from my reading that particularly capture a point or idea well. I don't make any other kind of notes for myself. When I revised I always just reread the essays and quotes and then I would always just do new reading, because otherwise revision was too boring for me to make myself do it. And practice papers, of course.
    Furthermore, with SOC2 my 'note taking' was worse than usual. Usually I'd offer to send supervision essays, but my essays for that paper were dire because the penny only dropped for me during revision.

    I seem to recall that Dr King wrote good handouts. Do you have those? I'm surprised he's still teaching. I thought he was retiring or leaving.

    (Original post by visesh)
    Also, meh, I'm younger than you :p: :aetsch::ahhhhh:
    Indeed, but appropriately, my last exams were 2 years ago
    The major problems with all of these is the cost (at least £500 per attempt), the pass rate (<40%) and the fact that I have next to no time to actually revise for these.
    Good luck
Updated: October 5, 2012
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