Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free to post

Ultimate St Andrews Accommodation Thread

Announcements Posted on
Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
    • Thread Starter
    • 43 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    We felt that the old thread was a little bit outdated and it would be easier for maintenance, etc if a current student created an updated version of the thread.
    Please see post #2 and #3 for mini guides to residences!

    If you notice anything that is wrong or contradictory, please let me know. Also, if you have any suggestions for improvements, also let me know

    NOTE TO CURRENT STUDENTS: If you have anything to contribute to this thread, that would be great.
    Although there are mini guides in the old thread which are good, I want to welcome any newer guides. Please only create a guide if your experience is from the 2010/2011 session onwards to keep the thread up-to-date. If you can include information on the rooms, location, food, size, facilities, etc.. that would be great! Needing UTD guides for Fife Park and Regs.


    Firstly...
    I would like to say a massive thank you to ImperceptibleNinja for creating and maintaining the old ultimate accommodation thread. Posts throughout the thread contain many answers to questions, so have a quick search through there and if you still can't find an answer, ask away in here.

    Also, the accommodation pages on the university's website has a lot of information which is vital, and will probably answer any basic questions.


    Accommodation in 1st year
    All first years are guaranteed to have a place in university accommodation if they apply before the deadline. The deadline is the 30th June on the year of entry.

    How do I apply?
    All students MUST apply for accommodation before the deadline, even if St Andrews is your insurance choice. All the information you need for applying is here. You must fill in the application form, and email it to the provided email address in the link previously posted.

    When will I hear back?
    • If you have an unconditional, you will probably receive your offer for accommodation sometime in July (provided you applied before the deadline).
    • If you have a conditional, you will not hear back until your offer is unconditional.
    • If St Andrews is your insurance, you will hear back after the university becomes your firm unconditional choice.

    Applicants must log in to their e-Contract after they have applied for accommodation to make sure their email address is up-to-date. This is also where you'll find details of your accommodation when you are offered it, and where you accept or reject the offer (which you must do within 10 days of being made an offer).

    A small note...
    I've noticed a lot of people always ask: "What accommodation is closest to the X building?"
    This isn't that relevant when you're in 1st year. A lot of 1st year lectures are not taught in their subject buildings. For example, in the past psychology lectures have taken place in the chemistry and physics buildings, and economics lectures have taken place in the physics and buchanan building. However, 1st year science lectures usually take place in their subject building's as science lecture theatres tend to be larger.


    Types of halls of residence
    When filling in the accommodation form, they ask you for preferences on the following:

    Self-catered vs. Catered
    The cost of catered accommodation covers all your meals, making it easier to budget for the year. You also don't need to spend time trekking to Morrisons/Aldi to buy food, and you don't have to fuss about washing up. This is also a good option if you're from further away and don't want the hassle of storing pots and pans over the summer. The meal times are fixed, which can be awkward if you don't want to eat at the time food's available. There are cooking facilities in halls, but because they're only used a couple of times a week, they're typically not amazing, so if you like to bake or are picky about your food, it might be worth considering self catering. It's also easier to have guests over and cook for them in self-catered. Unforunately, you must leave your room during the Christmas vacation if you live in catered, although you can leave everything in your room. This is because there will not be any catering or cleaning staff available during the holidays.


    En suite vs. Standard
    I've never had en suite, but they tend to make things more expensive, and the facilities in halls without ensuite have to be up to a decent standard. Newer halls seem to have more ensuite showers, whereas older places tend to have standard rooms, with both baths and showers available. A lot of people like the privacy and like the hygeine aspect of having an en-suite whereas others feel that for the extra cost, it just isn't worth it.


    Single vs. Shared
    To clarify, a shared room is literally one room with two people living in it together - it's not like a shared apartment which has more separated spaces inside it. Take a single room, make it bigger, duplicate most of the furniture, add another person and you've got a shared room.
    On the application form, they ask for interests/hobbies, and whether you're more outgoing or reserved, and also what kind of time you'd typically get up and go to bed. These factors are taken into account when pairing up room-mates, or even considering who lives near who. The shared rooms are for two people of the same sex.
    Different pairs of room-mates get along differently - some just click and have an amazing time, some coexist in the same space without any great interaction (either positive or otherwise), and some can't abide each other. Most people seem to get along alright, although the ones who don't get along tend to be a lot more vocal about it.
    Bear in mind that even if you do have a single room, your neighbours will probably still be able to hear clattery typing, loud music and any midnight shenanigans, so the absence of a room-mate doesn't grant you total freedom.


    It may also be worth having a think about the following, although the university don't ask for your preference on this:

    Older accommodation vs. More recently built accommodation
    Basically, older accommodation is more romantic, more interesting, more individual, has higher ceilings with occasionally pretty details, but has the drawback of being unpredictable - maybe you'll get a massive room, maybe you won't. Newer accommodation is more like a lot of identical or reflected components, all stuck together in a methodical way. It means you know what you're getting, and it will have been designed for living in. It might not be big, but it will hopefully be more ergonomic. It's less pre-personalised, but acts as a blank canvas for your personality, and any quirks will probably be ones that your neighbours can empathise over.


    The halls of residence and accommodation fees

    The guide to residences page on the website gives more information on the size of halls. We also have mini guides to residences if you scroll further down, written by students.

    Catered halls
    • Andrew Melville Hall (Standard)
    • David Russell Appartments (14 meals a week) (En-suite)
    • John Burnett Hall (has 2 parts: Atholl - Standard and Annexe - En-suite)
    • McIntosh (Standard)
    • St Regulus Hall (Standard)
    • St Salvator's Hall (Standard)
    • University Hall (Standard)


    Seld-Catered halls
    • Albany Park (Standard)
    • David Russell Appartments (En-suite)
    • Fife Park Appartments (En-suite)
    • Fife Park (Standard)
    • Agnes Blackadder Hall (En-suite) - previously called New Hall


    Residence fees
    Residence fees change on a yearly basis. The current undergraduate residence fees can be found here. These fees include hall subscriptions which is basically money that goes towards the hall committee to put on events for you to better you experience of halls.

    How do I pay my residence fees?
    There are different methods of paying your accommodation fees. This page has all the information you'll need. Basically, you can either pay in full, in 2 instalments or 3 instalments.


    What is provided in the rooms?

    The details of this depend on the individual hall but all rooms should have:
    • A bed and mattress
    • Study desk
    • 1 chair
    • Shelving space (usually a bookcase as well as shelves on the wall)
    • A wardrobe of some sort
    • Some drawers
    • A lamp
    • A general waste bin (a lot of rooms also have paper bins)
    • A phone
    • A notice board

    As of the 2011/2012 session, bedding is not provided (a mattress protector is provided). However, you can purchase a bedding pack online, either via the online shop or on your e-contract. This will then be put in your room for your arrival.

    There will probably be at least one mirror but again in twin rooms you might have to share. Just as there is usually one phone per person, there is also one internet socket thingy per person if required, however, all university rooms have been installed with wireless internet as of the 2011/12 session.


    How to know what room you've been assigned
    When you are given your room allocation, it will have a room 'code'. This has the most general location on the left, and as you work to the right, it gets more specific.

    The first 2-3 characters will be letters denoting the hall.
    The next 2-3 characters will be floor number, building name or building number.
    The next 2-3 numbers will be your room number.
    A small 'a' or 'b' at the end means you are in a shared room, but doesn't have any other practical implications as far as I am aware.


    For example, FP1702 would be Fife Park, House 17, room 02.

    If you want help working out what your room code means, do ask, but I'd avoid posting the full detail, otherwise anyone can find out where you will be living.


    Transfer requests
    Transfer requests are there incase you don't like the place you're staying/don't like your room/housemate(s). I don't have any experience of transfer requests, however, all the information you'll need can be found here and in other accommodation pages. Note that not all transfer requests will be fulfilled.


    Living in town/renting privately
    (Written by Oh-WOW) (Little updates by Ecosse_14)
    I basically don't have that much knowledge of renting privately because I managed to get my flat quite easily but I will say what I know.
    Renting privately can turn out more expensive or cheaper than halls, depending on where you look. The centre of town is around £500 per person per month excluding bills or more (although there will be the odd cheap place in the centre). The further out you go, the cheaper it gets but you'll struggle to find anything on or below £300 per person per month. Choose a realistic budget (around £400). Remember you still have to pay bills on top of your rent in most cases. Being out in the badlands is not the end of the world. St Andrews is a small place and even being on the outskirts of town is still only about 25 minutes from town!

    Getting a house/flat in St Andrews is difficult and you need to be prepared. There are various estate agents around town. The most popular are Premier Lets, Eve Brown, MDDC, Bradune and Co, Pagan Osbourne and Inchdairnie but there are others. You need to check their websites/go in and ask around January time and make a list of when their lists of properties are coming out. You need to be prepared. As of the 2011/12 session, most of the estate agents put up their lists online or are emailed to you, make sure you know how they will be released before they come out so you're prepared. You'll need references (a character reference and one from halls/previous landlord. You'll need to sign up to a list to get this from the warden and it might take a while to complete so get it organised early) and sometimes a few other things (check with the estate agents before the list is released). I advise you get these things sorted before the Christmas break (for the warden reference), or during the Christmas break when you're at home. Once you get the list, go and see the house/flat and apply straight away with all the documents they require (some need parental guarantor forms so get these signed by parents ASAP before lists come out).

    After that, you may be interviewed. They'll ask things like how you met your flatmates, if your part of any clubs or societies, etc. They tend to be pretty relaxed so don't worry. Be prepared as you want to give a good impression because it is very competitive. After that you'll either get rejected or accepted. Apply to as many flats as you can and a wide range of them. Not just the cheap ones in the town centre because they are the most competitive. Go a little bit further out just so you don't end up having nothing.

    A few other ways to get a flat is to make friends with 4th years who are leaving or anyone else who is moving out as they can then tell their landlord about you and you'll get a flat.

    You can also try uni managed accommodation. Though please be aware that these houses are really really competitive and are chosen by random ballot so it is purely down to luck and you can't apply back to halls if you apply to one of these. Applying back to halls is a good idea just in case you don't get a flat. You can always turn down the offer.

    This guide has some really great advice in regards to private accommodation. Please read it!
    • Thread Starter
    • 43 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Mini Guides to Residences

    Agnes Blackadder Hall (previously New Hall)

    User: Helsy

    ROOMS
    The rooms are all identical, though half are mirror image of the other half. You have a (British) double bed with a drawer unit underneath to store stuff. You’ll have a large desk with phone and desk light, two bedside tables and a large bookshelf. But you can do what many of us did, and move one of the bedside tables and push the bed up against the wall, that way you get more room in the middle of the floor. There’s also a built in wardrobe that is quite big.
    The ensuite bathroom has a toilet, sink and shower with shower curtain. It’s decent, though the shower can sometimes flood a little so a shower mat would be advisable. Also always make sure you shower with the door closed and close it after you’ve showered, as the steam can set off the fire alarm in your room.
    New Hall has wireless internet access, but you also have 2 wired internet access points.
    To get into your room, you have to use your matriculation card. Hold it against the black block above the door handle, and when it shines green you can enter. You’ll need to update it every 3 days, but that should be explained to you when you arrive (and it’s really easy). When you leave your room, the door will stay unlocked for about 1 minute, so for instance, if you forgot your matric card, you can go back for it.
    Your room will be cleaned once a month, and the bins in your room (regular waste and paper recycling) will be emptied once a week.

    FACILITIES
    You enter through the lobby, at night there is security on the door and after 11pm you have to open the door with your matric card, with reception on your left. The post is held in a metal cabinet that is rolled out during the day. It’s all organised by surname alphabetically, with a list showing the people who have packages and registered letters that get collected from reception at the advertised times.
    There is a games room with pool, air hockey and various other things, and a cafe that’s open from roughly 9am to 6pm (but it varies), that serves hot and cold drinks and snacks and you can also buy lunch there.
    The laundry room is round the corner and at the end. It’s currently coin operated (and they can be picky about coins) but the University is in the process of swapping the coin operators for card operated machines.
    There is also a music room next to the wardens office and vendy machines. You can also find a lift that takes you to all the other floors and to the computer room.

    LOCATION
    We’re right on North Haugh, so New Hall is perfect for the sciences (I studied in the Physics building and it took me less than 5 minutes to get there everyday). The Sports centre is right behind New Hall and it only takes 15 minutes or so to walk into town.
    You can see New Hall if you arrive with the bus or drive the normal way in. It’s the giant Swedish prison. And Andrew Melville next door looks like a pirate’s ship.
    Plus, we have bunny rabbits in the little garden areas that you might have your room look out over.

    FOOD
    New Hall is now completely self-catered. You will share kitchens with 6-12 other people. You will have your own lockable cupboard to stash food away in, and more cupboards to store pans, plates etc. There is also a fridge and freezer, big table and plenty of chairs. It is also in your kitchen that you’ll find the corridors hoover, mop, ironing board and iron etc. The kitchen also require your matric card to open. It is also cleaned once a week with the bins (waste, paper, metal, plastic) being emptied 3 times a week.

    ATMOSPHERE
    With roughly 500 students, New Hall is quite large, so it might not be quite as close knit as some of the other halls. But with so many people, you’ll find friends easily during man of the events they hold during Freshers’ weeks and during the rest of the year.
    It’s also quite an international hall, with students from all over the world.
    There is tons of space to hang out with people, and kitchen parties are common.
    The staff are all really, really friendly and the assistant wardens are really helpful.


    Albany Park
    User: Ecosse_14
    Albany Park is a self-catered residence.

    LOCATION
    Albany Park (Albany/Gatty) is situated approximately a 15 minutes walk out of the centre of town on the East side of St Andrews. You have East Sands (a lovely beach) and the sea RIGHT on your doorstep. East Sands Leisure Centre is also next door, as well as the gatty which is good for any marine biologists. Albany is the furthest away hall from the North Haugh (science buildings) but since St Andrews is so small, it only takes around 25 minutes to get there (unless you like to walk slowly). A lot of Albanians (Albany residents) have bikes so they can get into town quicker.

    ACCOMMODATION
    Albany is a complex of houses with 6 people to each house (for undergrads). Beware, there is no logical numbering system of the houses and they're dotted all over the area In each house, you have an entrance hall with the stairs, a downstairs and an upstairs. Downstairs you have bedrooms 1-3, the bathroom and kitchen. Upstairs you have bedrooms 4-6, a common room and a toilet with 2 sinks (WC).
    The bedrooms are fairly small but I personally thought the size was good and you're able to find somewhere for all of your belongings. It has space to sleep 2 people on your floor. In the room, you're provided with a bed, wardrobe, bookshelf, bedside drawers, a desk, more shelves, noticeboard, a lamp and a phone. You can store stuff under your bed, at the bottom of your bed, in your wardrobe/on top of your wardobe and also in the common room I guess (especially if you don't use it much).
    The bathroom has a toilet, sink and a shower. The showers can take a while to get used to (especially if you're claustrophobic) but are good. Although, to be honest, I know some houses had a few problems with plumbing and getting hot water, but if you let the office know it gets fixed.
    The kitchen has a fridge/freezer, cooker with oven/grill, sink (ofcourse), like a breakfast bar, 6 stools, microwave, kettle, around 8 cupboards + cupboard space under the sink and some pots, pans and trays. You will need to provide your own plates/bowls/cutlery/utensils. You may also need to buy your own toaster. The kitchen is quite small but practical. It is virtually impossible for all 6 people to cook at the one time (I'd say 2 people, maybe 3 max if you don't want to end up killing each other). There isn't much eating space in the kitchens but you have the common room if you want to eat together.
    The upstairs toilet is very large, with a toilet and 2 sinks, 2 mirrors and 2 lights that you can also plug like shavers and that into.
    The common room is an OK size (you will go to many parties in common rooms) and most houses should probably have 2 large sofas by now, although some still have 6 random (not so comfy) chairs. You might use your common room every day, you might never use it. I guess it depends who your housemates are and how well you get on with them. You're also provided with an ironing board, an iron, a hoover and a clothes horse, a mop thingy, and a bucket in your house.
    So overhall, the houses are quite small but practical. You will grow to love your wee house!

    CLEANING
    Thought I'd chuck in a wee bit about cleaning. You do not get a cleaner in Albany Park. You must clean your own room and house and you will get monthly cleaning inspections. Make sure you clean absolutely everything when a cleaning inspection is coming up. If you fail your first cleaning inspection (which my house did almost every time), you will get a recheck and a list of things that you failed on. If you fail the recheck, I'm afraid you will be getting an email saying you owe the university money because someone will come in and clean it for you and then charge you for it. As of the middle of the 2010/2011 session, your room will also be checked. It won't be scrutinised, they usually just chuck it's not an absolute mess and that you don't have anything on your walls you shouldn't. On that note, you're not allowed posters/flags/ANYTHING on your walls (only on your noticeboard!). You're also not allowed anything like fairy lights, kettles, etc. in your room. They WILL be confiscated.

    FACILITIES
    Albany Park has a common room, computer room, 2 laundries and bike storage. The common room used to be the old bike shed but it was converted a while ago now and is now the home to some Albany parties/gatherings. I think the current committee have plans to change it a wee bit so I won't bother telling you what's provided in it. The computer room has also been updated (from the pictures on the website) and now has up-to-date computers, etc. There are 2 laundries (think there's around 7 or 8 washers and 7 or 8 driers in total). A wash costs £1.80 (£2 for a super wash or whatever it's called). Driers cost £1. The bike storage is quite large, waterproof and safe as far as I know (I don't have a bike).

    ATMOSPHERE
    This is the bit where I tell you Albany is amazing. Albany is well known for their awesome and regular house parties. There is aways a house party going on in Albany on a Friday/Saturday night. There is a fantastic hall spirit and all the residents are proud to call themselves Albany Park residents (even from day 1). Some prospective students feel wary about not knowing very many people and are confused on how Albany has such a good hall spirit if they're not all living within the one building. The Albany Park committee are fantastic at including everyone and making sure people get to know others outwith their own house. Parties are a regular occurrence (with hugeee amounts of free alcohol, especially in fresher's week!) and this allows everyone to get to know each other. There are also a few clubs run by the wardennial team, I know they have a photography club and a couple others (you'll find out more about those during the welcome talks).

    Finally, Albany is cheap Overall, Albany Park is amazing. It's quite a competitive hall to get into, so if you get a place, count yourself lucky and enjoy it. I know you will


    Andrew Melville Hall
    User: maryelizabethconn

    Hello everybody! I'm going to be Senior Student for Andrew Melville Hall for next year and I've been noticing some posts around the site where users don't seem very keen. Naturally, I understand the horror upon seeing the building- yes, it is a laughing stock. Admittedly it's not attractive from the outside like Sallies, Regs or McIntosh but I would really discourage you from judging the hall harshly based SOLEY on its exterior before you hear any of the plethora of stories that convey nothing but Melville LOVE.

    What I've come here to do it to throw Andrew Melville Hall into a more favourable light and dispel any myths or rumours that you've either heard about Melville or decided upon seeing its exterior (it's OK- we roll with the jokes). Having lived there for my first two years at St Andrews (this year's my final year studying Medicine there) I can whole-heartedly recommend the Melville experience. Melville has been nothing but positive for myself and all my friends who have lived there. Would I waste my valuable time in the summer holidays recommending it to you or, indeed, waste my time representing something I didn't truly believe in? Of course not!

    First of all, the matter of the building's exterior. Yes, the building may have been likened to two sinking ships (then again, New Hall was designed to resemble a Swedish prison) and is a concrete remnant of the not-so-glorious architectural age of the 1960s. I absolutely empathise- the building is not the most attractive, especially compared to Sallies. However, having spent a significant amount of time at Sallies in first year, I can safely say that Melville is far warmer. The rooms may be small but they conserve heat very efficiently, especially in comparison to the older halls and you're going to really notice that when your friends from the ancient halls have the hideous middle-of-semester flu which you have managed to avoid.

    Regarding the location of the building itself, it may rightly be seen as one of the halls farthest out of town. If you walk at a reasonable pace, you can reach town easily within ten minutes. Another positive is that if you're a scientist or medic, your classes are three minutes away. If you're artistically inclined and have classes in town, you're going to get exercise. It is rightly said that a high proportion of all University students gain weight especially in first year. Walking will keep the weight off and will provide excellent opportunity to walk into town with your new classmates. You're bound to make friends and find people to sit next to in classes this way (I speak from experience, having made very close bonds this way). Also, Melville is far out of town... for St Andrews. Ten minutes. You could be in Glasgow where lots of halls are forty minutes away from lectures. Comparatively, St Andrews could fit into your pocket.

    The hall is renowned for having a really strong community atmosphere, and the Melvillites are known as some of the friendliest and most sociable students at the University. We have regular drinking and pizza socials in-halls funded by Hall Committee. These are always extremely popular and are a fantastic way to kick off your weekend. Melville socials are often so popular that it is not uncommon to see non-Melvillites sneaking in. For the recent nuptials of our most famous alumni, a certain Mr William Wales and Miss Kate Middleton, Melville rose to the occasion by hosting an extremely well-attended and raucously-received Pimms party on the lawn. You never have to worry about feeling lonely in Andrew Melville Hall.

    Around 250 students live here during the academic year, the vast majority of these in single rooms so you don't have to worry about roommates, in a set-up of five main blocks (A-E). Rooms are in corridors of eight, usually with two toilets, a water-boiler (convenient for coffee during late nights) and showering facilities, although some corridors have one toilet and a bath. You get to know your neighbours quite well which is fantastic during Freshers' Week for making friends quickly. The set-up of blocks means that you always seem to be running into people in the corridors and meeting new people in the lobby any time you go out. Each room looks out onto surrounding parkland, home to a large profusion of wild rabbits and the odd heron lurking by the lake. Our hall committee is also very actively involved in organising numerous successful social events throughout the semester, not to mention, much-anticipated Christmas and Summer Balls to celebrate the end of each semester. Students are heartily encouraged to partake in suggesting and organising hall events.

    Year on year our Hall Committee gets better and better. This past year, the committee organised a massively successful ball each semester respectively. In fact, the Christmas Ball was so successful that demand for tickets out-stripped supply for the Summer Ball. Naturally, the hall fee that you pay with accommodation fees means that entry to the summer ball is free for residents and the Christmas Ball usually costs under £5 per resident.

    Andrew Melville Hall is perfect not only to suit the sociable, but also the academic (reluctant or otherwise) amongst you. Its three common rooms have a pool table, table-tennis table, organ, vending machines, television and a piano when students want to chill out after a long day of classes. It also has two study rooms at the end of each “ship”, one with a computer room and the other with a small library. These are ideal for studying for exams and writing essays. Another positive is that our wardens and sub-wardens are extremely friendly and helpful if you ever need them.

    Students are served 19 delicious meals per week (the food improves every year) in the Dining Room, which boasts beautiful panoramic views of the world famous Old Course. At the weekends, or in the likely event of hunger striking mid-study session, students can cook using one of the 3 well-equipped kitchens. Each kitchen has lockers, fridges and freezers where perishable goods can be stored.

    If all this has not convinced you of Melville’s sheer magnificence, an interesting piece of trivia is that Andrew Melville Hall featured (for a whole 6 seconds) in the 2010 adaption of Kazuo Ishiguro’s novel “Never Let Me Go”, featuring Keira Knightley. If Andrew Melville Hall has the A-list seal of approval, we’d love you to give it yours.

    Please don't be discouraged from applying to Melville. As one of the heads of Hall Committee this year, I have been so inspired by the previous year's committee and I can say with all my heart that this year is going to be absolutely phenomenal for the Melvillites. Last year we won Inter-Hall Sports and the Inter-Hall Energy competition and I know that things will keep improving. I'm really keen that we uphold the excellent tradition of winning (not in the Charlie Sheen sense of the word) award and gaining more recognition as a Hall. The Alex Wilson Memorial Sports Award was newly presented this year to the member of Hall who contributes most to sport and we hope that it will encourage the sporty among you to represent Melville as we compete (and hopefully win) against other Halls.

    If any of you have any queries about Andrew Melville Hall then please don't hesitate to drop me a message and I will respond to you as soon as possible.

    Hope you're all having a wonderful summer and I hope to see you in Melville next semester! xx


    David Russell Appartments
    User: Helsy

    ROOMS
    There are typically 5 rooms to a flat, and there are 12 flats and 3 studio flats per building.
    Each of the rooms look more or less the same: large desk with phone and desk light and tonnes of plug sockets, 2 (moveable) bedside-table/drawer units, (British) double bed, mirror, notice board and shelving-wardrobe unit. It might sound like there isn't tonnes of storage space, and might look it when you first walk in, but there is actually loads. Also, you can do what I did to get more room space, and push the bed up against the window.
    The en-suite bathroom has a toilet, sink, shower (with shower curtain) and mirror.
    The rooms in DRA have under-floor heating, TVs in each room (if you’re going to use it remember to get a TV license), wireless internet across all the DRA buildings and lights are controlled by leaving your room key in the slot next to the door (a bit like some hotels). That way when you’re not in the room, you don’t waste electricity.
    There is a cupboard in the corridor that has a hoover, ironing board and iron, mop and bucket and broom. You’re responsible for cleaning your own room and there is a monthly inspection for health and safety purposes.

    FACILITIES
    You’ll get into your flat/building by inserting your key card into the slot on the main door. If you live in flats 1-3, then you can get to your flat from the outside. Flats 4-6 are 1st floor, 7-9 on 2nd and 10-12 on the top floor.
    Each building has an inside bike room with the same door lock as the other doors. Otherwise there is plenty of bike storage outside your building and around DRA.
    You collect mail from the mail boxes in the alcove next to the main door (there’ll be a key in the flat). Any large parcels will be delivered straight to the kitchen. Anything coming by courier will need to be accepted/signed for by someone in the flat, as reception are not able to accept on your behalf.
    The facilities building is where members of staff can be found. Reception is your normal port of call, if you need a new light bulb for your room, etc. The warden’s office is also there. Also, this is where everyone who is catered will eat. The Bistro serves breakfast and dinner on the weekdays and breakfast and lunch on the weekend. You’ll be given a meal card. You can also go in as a self-catered student for the occasional meal which you pay for.
    Otherwise, this is where the DRA Bar is which hosts a popular quiz; a games room with pool, table football, etc; IT room with printer; and vending machines.
    The laundry room is over next to the nursery (not affiliated with the university). You need your key card to get in, and you need a laundry card to pay for the machines (you can buy a card in the facilities building). There are tonnes of machines (I’ve never had to wait for a machine) with driers on top and washers on the bottom. Also a bench where you can fold or just sit and wait.

    LOCATION
    Okay, so DRA is quite far out of town. Or it feels like it sometimes. To walk into town it will only take approximately 20-25 minutes, shorter if you’re fast, or less than 15 if you’re going to North Haugh for the sciences. A popular option is to get a bike, which shortens things considerably (I can make it to physics in about 5 minutes). Also, there is a bus to and from town directly (no. 92) that’s every 20 minutes between about 9am-5pm. There are also the 99s that pass DRA that go into town and beyond.

    FOOD
    DRA is a mix of catered and self-catered flats. Every flat has a kitchen, with hob, oven, fridge/freezer, microwave and dishwasher. There will be a few pots provided, but everything else you will need to provide yourself. Obviously if you’re self-catered you’ll probably need more than someone who is catered needs. But those who are catered need to remember that for lunch during the week and dinner at weekends they need to make themselves something and so should not arrive with nothing.
    Everyone has a lockable cupboard, so you can stash away food, with additional cupboards to put things like pots and pans, etc in.
    There is a breakfast bar style table with seating for 5 and then there’s 2 coffee tables and 2 sofas for recreation.
    The bins (normal waste and recycling) need to emptied by those in the flat (many flats have a rota system) and you are also responsible for all cleaning. Again, there is a monthly inspection.
    If you’re catered, see catered section.

    CATERED (Note, details may change)
    On weekdays you have breakfast and dinner, and on the weekends you have breakfast and lunch.
    DRA Bistro Hours: Breakfast 8am-10am, Lunch 12noon-1:30pm, Dinner 5.30pm-7pm.
    At breakfast, you’re entitled to a bowl of hot cereal (porridge, etc), bowl of cereal, fruit, 3 hot items, hot drink, fruit juice, and toast. But that doesn’t mean you have to take each of those . The cereals, drinks and fruit typically stay the same each day, but the hot cereal and hot breakfast items change each day.
    For lunch and dinner, you are allowed to take a bowl of soup, a bowl of salad, a main and sides, dessert, a hot drink, fruit juice. There are 3 mains, one being vegetarian and then about 3-4 side dishes (all usually vegetarian).
    You can order a packed lunch, but you need to place the order at dinner the day before.
    If you have any particular food issues, you can bring it up with the hall chef.

    ATMOSPHERE
    With about 900 students, DRA is the biggest hall in the university. And though it may not be a close knit group like some of the smaller halls, it’s a very friendly and open place to live. A big advantage is that you live in a closed flat, so you get to know your flatmates well, and also don’t have the risk of hearing hundreds of people pass your room on a Friday night like some other halls have. And with so many people in the hall, you’ll find friends easily during all the events the hall has during Freshers’ week and over the course of the year. We’re also a very international hall, with people from across the world. Everyone is really friendly and the staff are always helpful.


    Fife Park
    Do you live in Fife Park or have you lived there recently? If so, would you be able to write an up-to-date guide on FP and your experience? Thanks.


    Fife Park Appartments
    User: LGF92
    Guide to life in FPA:

    • Keep a change jar, the laundry is £1.80 and they don't give change
    • Morrisons may seem like a longer walk, but it's actually not and it's a bit more scenic (the quickest way is to go down Lawhead Road and walk through the botanical gardens)
    • If you need a bus into town the 99 calls at :43 every hour
    • The walls are thicker than you think, so don't worry about noise
    • There is a cat that lurks about wanting to be fed, especially if you live on the ground floor
    • If you've bought a TV licence, the TVLA will send you threatening letters nonetheless but ignore them
    • The new postcode is KY16 9WJ but some places refuse to accept anything but the older KY16 9UE
    • Make sure you write shopping lists, there's nothing more annoying than walking 30 minutes back and realising you've forgotten one thing
    • If you tell people there's a party or something, make sure you give them proper directions as it's not visible from the rest of the DRA
    • The fire alarm is tested at 9ish am every Tuesday. Prepare for it cos it's terrifyingly loud
    • There will be two fire drills a year; one early morning in winter and one mid-morning in summer/spring
    • The doors are fire doors and slam behind you; check your pocket to make sure your room card is in it before you leave (it's £15 to replace/be let in)
    • Flat parties are a great way to meet people!
    • Go to all the DRA social stuff cos it's free and fun
    • Pub Quiz every Thursday in the DRA bar with good prizes (I won a chocolate fountain)
    • Especially in winter, it's a lot better to pay 50p for a taxi to town between four people than walk the 1.5 mile round trip
    • If you study arts you will start to get sick of the walk around November. The 92 bus runs every 20 minutes via town from the DRA facilities building and is £5.50 for a weekly ticket
    • If you have non-induction compatible pans, they won't work and the cooker will beep furiously until you take it off
    • The cleaning inspectors will knock marks off for freezers with too much ice in them, defrost them every 6/7 weeks
    • A Christmas tree from Argos (£20 with décor) makes the sterile-looking lounge a bit more fun
    • Maisha will deliver to FPA, but only to the DRA facilities building - no such trouble with KFB who came to Fife Park car park


    John Burnet Hall
    User: do2

    John Burnet is divided into two parts, main hall and annex. This guide will cover both.

    ROOMS
    In the main hall, it is quite typical for first years and JYA/JSAs to share a room and all bathrooms are shared. The main building is divided into a male wing and a girls wing. The girls wing is made up of two attached buildings, Kilmalie and Fairways. Because the main hall is a marriage of different buildings of different eras and styles, each room is unique in shape and size. Quality of room really is hit and miss, my room was particularly big with full bay windows and an excellent view of the golf course and beach [photos available if requested], whilst others are a touch more crammed with little more to look at than the car park.

    The annexe meanwhile is somewhat different. Each room is the exact same size and dimension as those nearby and being purpose built for students. They are rather small in comparison to the main hall. The building has two floors and windows will either face the car park or front lawn.

    Each student regardless of building has their own bed, bedside table, desk, desk chair, wardrobe, a few book shelves, desk lamp and phone. Wired internet access is in each room, and wi-fi is available in the front hall and the library.

    FACILITIES
    In the main hall, each room comes with a washbasin and mirror while toilets and showers are shared. Sharing facilities isn't really much of a problem, they’re cleaned every day and there are usually 3 to a shower, I’ve never had to wait to use one. In addition, there are a number of pantries scattered around the building complete with toasters, fridges, microwaves and kettles. There are only 2 cookers across the entire building, which I have to say is pretty poor, although management tells me that this will be improved next year.

    The annexe meanwhile is en-suite and has 8 cookers across ~50 people with much nicer kitchens and dining facilities. Kitchens come equipped with toasters, ovens, microwaves, kettles, fridge, freezer and lockers for keeping food “safe”. In each kitchen there is also a rather standard dining table and chairs.

    LOCATION
    The hall is probably the best located (closely contested with McIntosh) in town, equidistant between the town and science faculties it should please most. We are just around the corner from North Haugh (second home to science students), so the walk will take just over 5 minutes to both departments. Meanwhile a trip to Tescos in the centre of town is around 10 minutes. The arts buildings on the other side of town is slightly further taking around 15 minutes. The sports centre is probably the furthest walk I make and that’s the same with 15 minutes in the other direction, to anyone unhappy with the trek, I am amused with the irony of being too lazy to walk to the gym.

    FOOD
    Writing a review of this year’s food would be quite futile because in September a new catering company will be doing an overhaul of the menu, so pretty much everything will change. I will update this in October once I get a feel for the new system.

    It is impossible to finish the food section without first mentioning Donald:
    Donald the head chef is something of a legend in John Burnet, according to rumour, he started here when he was 16 and 30 years later, is still here providing some great chat. The man is always in the know of any gossip that happens to be floating around hall and nothing (nothing!) slips past him.

    ATMOSPHERE
    With only 150 students, our hall is the smallest in the university, and we find that this makes us a close-knit bunch. Front hall is often the site of drinking and socialising regardless of the day of the week. I would say that almost everyone in hall knows each other by name bar a few who never leave their room or come to meals and because of that everyone becomes friends faster. Gossip spreads fast, and those who make particular buffoons of themselves on the weekend are publically congratulated at dinner every Monday.

    West Lounge is home to some kind of event, whether its a film night, party or simply a beer pong tourney nearly every week. Your committee will be making huge moves to cater for your needs, so if you have any ideas for events, get in touch.

    Our hall is very serious about its many traditions, and we feel it is this aspect that makes John Burnet unique. There are too many to list now, but if you’re interested, here is our traditions website.

    MISC
    Our library is quite nice for its size, desk space for about 25 people and 6 desktop computers is usually more than enough, except perhaps for a Sunday evening when essays are due in the next morning. A printer is available as well as access to our rather modest collection of books across various faculties.
    To anyone interested, a locked bike shed is provided and the key to this can be obtained from the manager’s office when you arrive.

    I feel like this is everything, but for more information see our facebook and website.
    If you'd like to ask any questions post here or more confidentially, you can private message me.
    • Thread Starter
    • 43 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Mini Guides to Residences (cont.)

    McIntosh

    User: Chicklet21
    LOCATION
    30 second walk from town. Close to the union (so great for staggering home after a night out), Market St (aka all the shops) and is also 5 minutes from most of the University (arts) departments, library, the quad and the Buchanan building. 10 minutes walk (max) from the science buildings. Also close to the West Sands for early morning beach jogging, and some of the views of the beach from the upper floor windows of hall are amazing. Chattan is, however, down a side street, so it is also nice and quiet for being so centrally located.

    AESTHETICS AND ACCOMMODATION
    Lovely old building. Rooms are a good size on the whole, with lots of quirky features like fireplaces and built in cupboards and huge bay windows (if you are the lucky person in my room next year anyway). Most first years in hall share a room, although there are a few who get single rooms. Sharing is not a problem, I don’t know of anyone who doesn’t get on with their roomie. The singles tend to be the more boxy rooms in hall, but still a good size, with everything you need. Rooms contain bed, desk, bedside table, sink, wardrobe or drawers and bookshelves. Bathrooms are nice, usually shared between about 6 people but never busy. Most of the bathrooms just have shower cubicles, but there are also one or two baths lurking about if you know where to find them. Bathrooms are cleaned and bins emptied in rooms daily, rooms are hovered once a week. There are 5 floors, A-E. A is on top, E is the basement and D is the ground floor where the entrance is A,C and D are girls floors, B is boys and E is mixed. There are about 200 people in hall, mostly freshers, although there are a fair few older students too. They tend to hide in their rooms and worry about work though.

    As far as facilities go, we have:

    • 2 TV rooms
    • A Hogwarts style common room, with 2 pianos (one upright, one grand) pool table, lots of chairs, free newspapers, fireplaces.
    • 2 study rooms (The Green room in particular has really good views of the beach, for daydreaming and general procrastination)
    • A computer room, lots of new computers, and printers
    • A small library of our own, decent selection of books relating to most courses
    • Vending machines for those late night munchies
    • 2 Laundry rooms, the main (Abbotsford) laundry and the secret laundry, which is... well, in a secret location on E floor. Good luck finding it, E floor is a real maze.


    FOOD
    Catered hall. Food is usually really good, but can occasionally be “interesting” (if you know what to avoid – cheesy chops and pizza chicken are the two main culprits – you are usually guaranteed a good meal). We were voted to have the best hall food in St Andrews. Breakfasts are pretty basic, the traditional fry up option, but made Scottish with Haggis if you want it, or toast and cereals, fruit, yoghurt, croissants and juice, as well as coffee, tea and hot chocolate. Lunch and dinner usually consist of a a choice of 3 or 4 meals, with at least one veggie meal and a choice of sandwiches or a jacket potato if you don’t fancy the hot meal. There is also soup with most meals (always really good) and a salad bar to help yourself to. The menu is on a 3 week rotation, but they always mix it up and throw some new things in once in awhile, so you don’t feel you’re eating the same thing every meal. Puddings are amazing, sticky toffee pudding and millionaire shortbread are my favourites. The dining room is also where all the post is delivered into little pigeon holes. Big ego booster.

    We get 19 meals a week: 3 meals a day Monday – Friday and breakfast and lunch on Saturday and Sunday. There is a kitchen on each floor for the evening meals at weekends, and although these are fairly small, and pretty basic (cooker, microwave and fridge) they do the job, and you can always eat out if you don’t fancy cooking.


    I couldn’t imagine being in any other hall. I’ve met so many great people and had such an amazing time here, I’ll be sad to move out at the end of the year!

    St Regulus
    Do you live in St Regulus or have you lived there recently? If so, would you be able to write an up-to-date guide on Regs and your experience? Thanks.

    User: Unknown
    LOCATION
    Very central location, right in town and within minutes walking distance from pubs, bars, shops, the Union and almost all clubs and events! Great for medical students, biologists and psychologists in particular as it is right next to the Bute (the Medical School building). However, the very central location means it is convenient for most subjects as it is so near town. Note that the medical building is now at the North Haugh

    (Except the sports centre which is 10 mins walk out if town)

    AESTHETICS, AMBIENCE AND ACCOMMODATION
    Situated at the end of a long street Queen's Gardens, St Regs blends smoothly into the rest of the street with traditional grey stone exterior and original features still in tact. This is a traditionally styled building. It was originally a gentlemans' club some years ago.

    The interior has character, with each room being slightly different in some way which adds to the quirks and charm of the building. It is not modern, but traditional and well maintained. The relatively small size means the 160 (40 of which live in the Annexe, 30 seconds walk from the main builiding) odd occupants become well aquainted and it is close knit and friendly.

    FACILITIES
    The fairly small size admittedly means the facilities, whilst perfectly adequate are perhaps not as large as some other residences. There is a library mainly used for general hanging out, chatting, meetings and various newspapers are delivered daily (paid for by the hall subscriptions - part of the accommodation fees), cheese and wine, or cheese and whisky are often held here along with High Table - regular formal dinners with guest speakers, wine, juice and tasty nibbles (provided by management, of course!). The TV room is very spacious and comfortable.The games room is also freely accessible for residents and their guests, this is often used for parties held by the Hall Committee (a group of elected students who represent the residents and spend most of their time holding events for the residents, having meetings and liasing with management staff). The games room has some games, pool table (currently a bit old and hoping to be replaced) and table tennis tables. The washing facilities are conveniently located within the main building, so unlike some residences (e.g. David Russell) you do not need to drag your huge bags of dirty clothes outside to another builiding. A normal wash costs 1.80 and an extra long wash costs 2.00. The tumble dryers cost 1.00, or you can use the drying room for free. Beware of leaving expensive/designer clothes, however!

    FOOD
    This varies according to personal taste. Some people enjoy the food and find it perfectly good, others are not so keen. Do note that even if you don't like the food, Tesco and restaurants are within easy access. Cooking for yourself is still cheap and easy. Given the expensive fees of some residences, it may even be cheaper to live in a catered hall and buy your own food! Do note that going to the catered meals is very social and a great way to meet people.

    There is usually enough food for people to have seconds should they be hungry. Vegetarians have been perfectly happy with the food served in hall

    Breakfast Weekdays
    Cereal, Toast, Porridge, Juice, Coffee, Tea, Hot chocolate, Milk, Sometimes fruit.

    Hot breakfast items vary. Usually three or so of: bacon, fried eggs, sausages, potato scones, boiled eggs, scrambled eggs, tomatoes, mushrooms, etc.

    Weekends
    As above but no hot breakfast. In addition there are usually croissants, pastries, muffins. Nicer yoghurts and more fruit.

    Lunch/Dinner
    There is always:

    HOT: two non vegetarian, one vegetarian choice.
    PUDDING: crumble/cake etc and always a choice of fruit or yoghurt
    SALAD BAR: lettuce, tomato, cucumber plus another choice that varies day to day
    STARTER: (for the evening meal only) will either be a soup (e.g. tomato and basil, Scotch broth, pumpkin, broccoli and stilton, mixed vegetable etc, usually rather good) with bread roll or a special salad/melon bowl, etc. If none of this appeals you can get a sandwich/roll or jacket potato (at lunch time).

    Juice, squash (sometimes) and water are available

    Typical lunches include: pizza, chips, deep fried fish, peas, baked potatoes, salads, curries, sandwiches, pasta.
    Typical dinners include: salmon, curries, pasta, lasagna, chicken dishes, vegetable bakes, meat and non meat moussaka, gammon.
    There is a roast Sunday lunch pretty much every week.

    CLEANING
    Bins are emptied daily, bathrooms are cleaned daily. Bedrooms are cleaned weekly.


    St Salvators

    User: becko37

    Sallies is a very sociable hall right in the centre of town (great news for those of you with 9am lectures who find it physically impossible to get up before 8:55). It’s not the oldest hall (built in the 1930s I think) but is one of the prettiest. Anyway, Wills and Kate lived there in their first year so it’s obviously the best hall. Just sayin’.

    Like Uni Hall, Regs and Macintosh, Sallies is a catered hall. It has something like 200 residents which is big enough to ensure you meet plenty of new people but also small enough that you don’t get swamped. As far as meals are concerned, I wouldn’t get your hopes up for Michelin starred cuisine, but mealtimes are definitely a great way to meet people or to catch up with friends who are on different courses and it’s also nice not to have to worry about cooking after a day of lectures. The dining room is also really pretty, a bit like some of the ones in the colleges at Oxford. They don’t cater at dinner time at the weekend, however, so you do get some chance to cook for yourself. The kitchens on each floor are pretty underequipped, though, with ovens that look like they’ve been there since the 1960s. Actually, they probably have. But you can always go out for dinner at the weekends – which most people do, especially if (like me) you’re idea of cooking is attempting to grill a pizza – and if you do need the kitchen it’s only twice a week so it’s fine. Also, sometimes people will steal your kitchen’s kettle and you’ll have to steal it back, but it’s all good fun.

    There are three floors (A, B and C) but room size varies hugely in Sallies. I had a ridiculously big double room (B10) whereas the double room next door (B11) was tiny. Size isn’t really important, however, as the rooms are all comfortable and come with their own sink, desk, bookshelves, wireless internet and wardrobe etc. Smaller rooms are also warmer in the winter. The bins are emptied every day and every so often your room will get vacuumed. and your sink will get cleaned. The rooms are also pretty as hall rooms go and even though they’ve taken out all the old panelling etc. it still has the feeling of an old traditional hall which is one of the reasons a lot of people want to live there. The beds are comfy but don’t come with a duvet or pillows though so bring those yourself so you don’t have to make a frantic dash to Argos on the busiest day of term like me.

    There are also single rooms, but I believe doubles are more common, and I actually ended up getting on really well with my roommate. When you apply for accommodation you also get to list your preferences with regards to when you get up/go to sleep and what kind of music you like so you accommodation staff can try and match you with a person quite similar to you. Depending on whether you’re at the front or back of the building you also get either a great view of the quad or a lovely view of the sea. The hall is also a very short walk from the pier and not too far from East Sands (good news after May Dip).
    As far as showers etc. are concerned they are communal – and so are the toilets – so this isn’t the hall for you if you wouldn’t be comfortable with that. As far as I’m concerned though it’s actually better than having an en suite (which you are obligated to clean) and I never once had to queue to use the shower in the morning.

    It’s also a really sociable hall with an active hall committee who organise loads of events for the residents. We had a hall pantomime at Christmas when I was there which was good fun, and we also had the occasional – FREE!!! – vodka bar (if you like your alcohol painfully strong, that is). There is also High Table, which everyone living in the hall gets the opportunity to attend once in the year. It’s basically an excuse to sit at the wardens table during dinner, but you get to dress up and wear your gown and have drinks with the wardens afterwards which I hear is good fun. There’s also the basement, which is a great place to have parties because no one can hear you making a racket. The basement also has a projector so you can watch DVDs on a big screen.

    Sallies is a lovely hall to live in during your first year (or even in later years) if you accept St Andrews. It’s one of the things people tend to think of when they think of St Andrews, probably due to Wills and Kate to be honest, but if you do get the chance then you’ll enjoy it. The hall is a stone’s throw from the town centre so you can just nip to the shops in a way you can’t in DRA and the further out halls. If you’re an arts student you will literally have about 2-5 minutes to walk to lectures and you also have almost no distance to travel back from the Union etc. after a night out. In addition, when you’re not drunk you might actually want to study, and Sallies is also a 5 minute walk from the main uni library which is ideal if you have books out on short loan, for instance. It’s also a really friendly hall with an eclectic mix of people studying loads of different things and coming from loads of different places. I had a great time living there and I met one of my housemates this year in hall, so I would definitely recommend Sallies to anyone considering hall accommodation in their first year!


    University Hall
    User: Oh-WOW
    Uni hall is a lovely place to live and I loved my year there.
    It's a bit further out of town than the other 'old' halls but it's right beside the North Haugh so great for science students and it's really not that bad for arts students! I managed for a whole year. It's about 10-15 minutes walk to town.

    Uni hall has a lovely atmosphere. There are about 300 people so it's small enough to get to know most people and for everyone to be quite close but not too small. You get to meet people from all over the world studying all sorts of things. This year there were about 80 returners, I think so there is a nice mix of freshers and returners.

    The hall is set out into three parts.
    Lumsden, which is the newest part, has 4 floors. A,B,C and D. A is mixed, B is boys, C is girls, D is mixed. Each floor has a kitchen, a utility room, 8 bathrooms and 40-45 rooms arranged in a T shape. The rooms are all pretty much identical and are almost all single rooms (there are one or two shared ensuite rooms on each floor). The rooms are a decent size. I had 2 people sleep comfortably on my floor and you could probaly get three at a push. The rooms have like a little porch area with coat hooks and where your bins are (this is hard to describe), a wardrobe and shelves, a desk, a noticeboard, a sink, towel rail above your radiator, bed (which is kind of built into a little alcove in the wall, again hard to describe), bookcase, two little sets of drawers and a lamp. There is loads of storage room. I had alot of stuff in my little room. Although they aren't the prettiest of rooms, it's nice to have a modern radiator that works (the rooms are quite warm, which was great during the snow) and windows that are easy to open. My friend in an older room had to stand on a chest of drawers to open her windows. The bathrooms are really nice. They are like little individual rooms with a shower, toilet and sink. The showers are really nice, warm and powerful. There are also a few toilet and shower cubicles at both ends of the T. The kitchens are quite modern with 2 fridge freezers, 2 ovens, 2 kettles, a toaster, 2 microwaves and a sink. Theres not much space in them and they can get a bit crazy at weekends. Theres also nowhere to eat at weekends and we tended to sit in the corridor or our rooms to eat. Which is a bit annoying. Lumsden also has the dining room (which is an attempt at being hogwarts but in a modern way...) which just has the servery and lots of big long tables which fit 14 people. Mealtimes are really sociable and a great way to make friends at the start of the year. There's also a computer room with a printer which is handy for late night essay printing. The foyer, janitors office and music practice room (with a piano) are also in the lumsden building. Lumsden isn't the prettiest building in the world but it is lots of fun!

    Old wing is an older building and is connected to Lumsden through a corridor. There are less rooms in Old wing about 30-40 on each floor. B floor is boys and C floor is girls. There are one or two rooms on A floor and they are usually for boys. The rooms are all really different and some of them have lovley old feautures like fireplaces, wooden floors and old furniture, while others are pretty plain. The single rooms are a bit bigger than Lumsden rooms but most of the freshers in old wing, share rooms. There is a kitchen on each floor which are alot bigger than the Lumsden ones and have a table and chairs. but there is only one cooker, which can be annoying. The bathrooms aren't as nice as they are more like shower cubicles and toilet cubicles, rather than individual bathrooms but they are fine and perfectly useable. In Old wing there is also the tv room, the party room, the games room with a table tennis table, science library and arts library, Old wing dining room (which is basically just a pretty old room with chairs and a grand piano, which you can play if you want. Theres also old wing common room which is just another big room with another piano. Thats where most of the events will be. There are loads of events in Uni hall over the year, with the highlight being all the vodka bars which happen like 4 times a semester. You basically get lots of free vodka (with a variety of mixers, or non alcoholic drinks for non drinkers) and there's music, etc. usually with a silly costume theme. Always lots of fun. There was also christmas cabaret, Mr Uni hall and a few other things held there throughout the year.

    Finally, there's Wardlaw, which I admit, I don't know very much about. It's a very pretty castle that isn't connected to the other parts of the hall. It's an all girls building with about 50 rooms, most of which are shared. The rooms are similar to old wing in that they are a mixed bag and some have some lovely old furniture and fireplaces, etc. Some even have a lovely view of the sea. The bathrooms are like individual rooms like Lumsden. I've never been in a Wardlaw kitchen so I'm not sure what they are like. There's a nice common room/tv room in Wardlaw. That's about all I know about Wardlaw.

    A quick note about the food. The food last year wasn't bad but at the end of the year they brought in a new catering company. I'm not sure if it's staying or not this year. The food with them wasn't great. At breakfast there was a points system which meant you could only take so much of the hot food. There was also cereal, fruit juice, bread, fruit and yoghurt. At lunch, there was a meat meal and veggie meal, accompanying side (usually potatoes), soup, bread, pudding, a salad bar, sandwich bar, baked potatoes (theres lots of potatoes, they're even mentioned in the hall song), fruit juice and fruit. Dinner was similar. There is always something to eat but some nights weren't that great. There was a lot of curry, mexican food, chips, etc and not a lot of vegetables. If they go back to the old menu then there's 2 meat options and a veggie option and it's a bit more varied. There's always plenty to eat but some days are better then others...

    I loved my year at uni hall and will really miss it. It's a really friendly and lovely place, with a great atmosphere. If you get a place there, enjoy it!
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    John Burnet Hall

    John Burnet is divided into two parts, main hall and annex. This guide will cover both.
    ROOMS
    In the main hall, it is quite typical for first years and JYA/JSAs to share a room and all bathrooms are shared. The main building is divided into a male wing and a girls wing. The girls wing is made up of two attached buildings, Kilmalie and Fairways.
    Because the main hall is a marriage of different buildings of different eras and styles, each room is unique in shape and size. Quality of room really is hit and miss, my room was particularly big with full bay windows an excellent view of the golf course and beach [photos available if requested], whilst others are a touch more cramped with little more to look at than the car park.

    The annex meanwhile is somewhat different. Each room is the exact same size and dimension as those nearby and being purpose built for students, are rather small in comparison to the main hall. The building has two floors and windows will either face the car park or front lawn.

    Each student regardless of building has their own bed, bedside table, desk, desk chair, wardrobe, a few book shelves, desk lamp and phone. Wired internet access is in each room, and wi-fi is available in front hall and the library.

    FACILITIES
    In main hall each room comes with a washbasin and mirror while toilets and showers are shared. Sharing facilities isn’t really much of a problem, they’re cleaned every day and there are usually 3 to a shower, I’ve never had to wait to use one. In addition, there are number of pantries scattered around the building complete with toasters, fridges, microwaves and kettles. There are only 2 cookers across the entire building, which I have to say is pretty poor, although management tells me that this will be improved next year.

    The annex meanwhile is en-suite and 8 cookers across ~50 people with much nicer kitchens and dining facilities. Kitchens come equipped with toasters, ovens, microwaves, kettles, fridge, freezer and lockers for keeping food “safe”. In each kitchen there is also a rather standard dining table and chairs.





    LOCATION
    The hall is probably the best located (closely contested with McIntosh) in town, equidistant between the town and science faculties it should please most. We are just around the corner from North Haugh (second home to science students), so the walk will take just over 5 minutes to both departments. Meanwhile a trip to Tescos in the centre of town is around 10 minutes. The arts buildings on the other side of town are slightly further taking around 15 minutes. The sports centre is probably the furthest walk I make and that’s the same with 15 minutes in the other direction, to anyone unhappy with the trek, I am amused with the irony of being too lazy to walk to the gym.

    FOOD
    Writing a review of this year’s food would be quite futile because in September a new catering company will be doing an overhaul of the menu, so pretty much everything will change. I will update this in October once I get a feel for the new system.

    It is impossible to finish the food section without first mentioning Donald:
    Donald the head chef is something of a legend in John Burnet, according to rumour, he started here when he was 16 and 30 years later, is still here providing some great chat. The man is always in the know of any gossip that happens to be floating around hall and nothing (nothing!) slips past him.

    ATMOSPHERE
    With only 150 students, our hall is the smallest in the university, and we find that this makes us a close-knit bunch. Front hall is often the site of drinking and socialising regardless of the day of the week. I would say that almost everyone in hall knows each other by name bar a few who never leave their room or come to meals and because of that everyone becomes friends faster. Gossip spreads fast, and those who make particular buffoons of themselves on the weekend are publically congratulated at dinner every Monday

    West Lounge is home to some kind of event, whether its a film night, party or simply a beer pong tourney nearly every week. Your committee will be making huge moves to cater for your needs, so if you have any ideas for events, get in touch.

    Our hall is very serious about its many traditions, and we feel it is this aspect that makes John Burnet unique. There are too many to list now, but if you’re interested, here is our traditions website.







    MISC

    Our Library is quite nice for its size, desk space for about 25 people and 6 desktop computers is usually more than enough, except perhaps for a Sunday evening when essays are due in the next morning. A printer is available as well as access to our rather modest collection of books across various faculties.
    To anyone interested, a locked bike shed is provided and the key to this can be obtained from the manager’s office when you arrive.

    I feel like this is everything, but for more information see our facebook and website.
    If you'd like to ask any questions post here or more confidentially, you can private message me.
    • 4 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Renting Privately.
    I basically don't have that much knowledge of renting privately because I managed to get my flat quite easily but I will say what I know.
    Renting privately can turn out more expensive or cheaper than halls, depending on where you look. The centre of town is around £500 per person per month excluding bills (although there will be the odd cheap place in the centre.) The further out you go, the cheaper it gets but you'll struggle to find much below £250 per person per month. Choose a realistic budget. Remember you still have to pay bills on top of your rent in most cases. Being out in the badlands is not the end of the world. St Andrews is a small place and even being on the outskirts of town is still only about 25 minutes from town!

    Getting a house/flat in St Andrews is difficult and you need to be prepared. There are various estate agents around town. The most popular are Premier Lets, Eve Brown, MDDC, Bradune and Co, Pagan Osbourne and Inchdairnie but there are others. You need to check their websites/go in and ask around January time and make a list of when their lists of properties are coming out. You need to be prepared. Get up early on the day the list is released and go queue. You'll need references (a character reference and one from halls. You'll need to sign up to a list to get this from the warden and it might take a while to complete so get it organised early) and sometimes a few other things (check with the estate agents before the list is released). Once you get the list, go and see the flat and apply straight away.

    After that, you may be interviewed. They'll ask things like how you met your flatmates and what your hobbies are etc. Be prepared as you want to give a good impression because it is very competitive. After that you'll either get rejected or accepted. Apply to as many flats as you can and a wide range of them. Not just the cheap ones in the town centre because they are the most competitive. Go a little bit further out just so you don't end up having nothing.

    A few other ways to get a flat is to make friends with 4th years who are leaving or anyone else who is moving out as they can then tell their landlord about you and you'll get a flat.
    Or try uni managed accomodation. Though please be aware that these houses are really really competitive and are choosen by random ballot so it is purely down to luck. and you can't apply back to halls if you apply to one of these. Applying back to halls is a good idea just incase you don't get a flat. You can always turn down the offer.

    This guide has some really great advice in regards to private accomodation. Please read it!
    http://www.yourunion.net/studentvoic...o_rent_201011/
    • Thread Starter
    • 43 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Oh-WOW)
    Renting Privately.
    I basically don't have that much knowledge of renting privately because I managed to get my flat quite easily but I will say what I know.
    Renting privately can turn out more expensive or cheaper than halls, depending on where you look. The centre of town is around £500 per person per month excluding bills (although there will be the odd cheap place in the centre.) The further out you go, the cheaper it gets but you'll struggle to find much below £250 per person per month. Choose a realistic budget. Remember you still have to pay bills on top of your rent in most cases. Being out in the badlands is not the end of the world. St Andrews is a small place and even being on the outskirts of town is still only about 25 minutes from town!

    Getting a house/flat in St Andrews is difficult and you need to be prepared. There are various estate agents around town. The most popular are Premier Lets, Eve Brown, MDDC, Bradune and Co, Pagan Osbourne and Inchdairnie but there are others. You need to check their websites/go in and ask around January time and make a list of when their lists of properties are coming out. You need to be prepared. Get up early on the day the list is released and go queue. You'll need references (a character reference and one from halls. You'll need to sign up to a list to get this from the warden and it might take a while to complete so get it organised early) and sometimes a few other things (check with the estate agents before the list is released). Once you get the list, go and see the flat and apply straight away.

    After that, you may be interviewed. They'll ask things like how you met your flatmates and what your hobbies are etc. Be prepared as you want to give a good impression because it is very competitive. After that you'll either get rejected or accepted. Apply to as many flats as you can and a wide range of them. Not just the cheap ones in the town centre because they are the most competitive. Go a little bit further out just so you don't end up having nothing.

    A few other ways to get a flat is to make friends with 4th years who are leaving or anyone else who is moving out as they can then tell their landlord about you and you'll get a flat.
    Or try uni managed accomodation. Though please be aware that these houses are really really competitive and are choosen by random ballot so it is purely down to luck. and you can't apply back to halls if you apply to one of these. Applying back to halls is a good idea just incase you don't get a flat. You can always turn down the offer.

    This guide has some really great advice in regards to private accomodation. Please read it!
    http://www.yourunion.net/studentvoic...o_rent_201011/
    Perfect, thank you Added to the opening post.
    • 4 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Now for my Uni hall guide.
    Uni hall is a lovely place to live and I loved my year there.
    It's a bit further out of town than the other 'old' halls but it's right beside the North Haugh so great for science students and it's really not that bad for arts students! I managed for a whole year. It's about 10-15 minutes walk to town.

    Edit: One thing that Uni Hall is in a great place for is the sports centre. It's literally right beside it. Which is handy for sporty types and non sporty types as lots of exams are held there.
    We also have tennis courts etc in the uni hall garden which uni hallers can use

    Uni hall has a lovely atmosphere. There are about 300 people so it's small enough to get to know most people and for everyone to be quite close but not too small. You get to meet people from all over the world studing all sorts of things. This year there were about 80 returners, I think so there is a nice mix of freshers and returners.

    The hall is set out into three parts.
    Lumsden, which is the newest part, has 4 floors. A,B,C and D. A is mixed, B is boys, C is girls, D is mixed. Each floor has a kitchen, a utility room, 8 bathrooms and 40-45 rooms arranged in a T shape. The rooms are all pretty much identical and are almost all single rooms (there are one or two shared ensuite rooms on each floor). The rooms are a decent size. I had 2 people sleep comfortably on my floor and you could probaly get three at a push. The rooms have like a little porch area with coat hooks and were your bins are (this is hard to describe), a wardrobe and shelves, a desk, a noticeboard, a sink, towel rail above your radiator, bed (which is kind of built into a little alcove in the wall, again hard to describe), bookcase, two little sets of drawers and a lamp. There is loads of storage room. I had alot of stuff in my little room. Although they aren't the prettiest of rooms, it's nice to have a modern radiator that works (the rooms are quite warm, which was great during the snow) and windows that are easy to open. My friend in an older room had to stand on a chest of drawers to open her windows. The bathrooms are really nice. They are like little individual rooms with a shower, toilet and sink. The showers are really nice, warm and powerful. There are also a few toilet and shower cubicles at both ends of the T. The kitchens are quite modern with 2 fridge freezers, 2 ovens, 2 kettles, a toaster, 2 microwaves and a sink. Theres not much space in them and they can get a bit crazy at weekends. Theres also nowhere to eat at weekends and we tended to sit in the corridor or our rooms to eat. Which is a bit annoying. Lumsden also has the dining room (which is an attempt at being hogwarts but in a modern way...) which just has the servery and lots of big long tables which fit 14 people. mealtimes are really sociable and a great day to make friends at the start of the year. Theres also a computer room with a printer which is handy for late night essay printing. The foyer, janitors office and music practice room (with a piano) are also in the lumsden building. Lumsden isn't the prettiest building in the world but it is lots of fun!

    Old wing is an older building and is connected to Lumsden through a corridor. There are less rooms in Old wing about 30-40 on each floor. B floor is boys and C floor is girls. There are one or two rooms on A floor and they are usually for boys. The rooms are all really different and some of them have lovley old feautures like fireplaces, wooden floors and old furniture, while others are pretty plain. The single rooms are a bit bigger than Lumsden rooms but most of the freshers in old wing, share rooms. There is a kitchen on each floor which are alot bigger than the Lumsden ones and have a table and chairs. but there is only one cooker, which can be annoying. The bathrooms aren't as nice as they are more like shower cubicles and toilet cubicles, rather than individual bathrooms but they are fine and perfectly useable. In Old wing there is also the tv room, the party room, the games room with a table tennis table, science library and arts library, Old wing dining room (which is basically just a pretty old room with chairs and a grand piano, which you can play if you want. Theres also old wing common room which is just another big room with another piano. Thats where most of the events will be. There are loads of events in Uni hall over the year, with the highlight being all the vodka bars which happen like 4 times a semester. You basically get lots of free vodka (with a variety of mixers, or non alcoholic drinks for non drinkers) and theres music etc. usually with a silly costume theme. always lots of fun. there was also christmas cabaret, Mr Uni hall and a few other things held there throughout the year.

    Finally, theres Wardlaw, which I admit, I don't know very much about. It's a very pretty castle that isn't connected to the other parts of the hall. It's an all girls building with about 50 rooms, most of which are shared. The rooms are similar to old wing in that they are a mixed bag and some have some lovely old furniture and fireplaces etc. Some even have a lovely view of the sea. The bathrooms are like individual rooms like Lumsden. I've never been in a Wardlaw kitchen so I'm not sure what they are like. Theres a nice common room/tv room in Wardlaw. that's about all I know about wardlaw.

    A quick note about the food. The food last year wasn't bad but at the end of the year they brought in a new catering company. I'm not sure if it's staying or not this year. The food with them wasn't great. At breakfast there was a points system which meant you could only take so much of the hot food. there was also cereal, fruit juice, bread, fruit and yoghurt. At lunch, there was a meat meal and veggie meal, accompanying side (usually potatoes), soup, bread, pudding, a salad bar, sandwich bar, baked potatoes (theres lots of potatoes. they're even mentioned in the hall song), fruit juice and fruit. Dinner was similar. There is always something to eat but some nights weren't that great. There was a lot of curry, mexican food, chips etc and not alot of vegetables. If they go back to the old menu then theres 2 meat options and a veggie option and it's a bit more varied. Theres always plenty to eat but some days are better then others...

    I loved my year at uni hall and will really miss it. It's a really friendly and lovely place, with a great atmosphere. If you get a place there, enjoy it!
    • Thread Starter
    • 43 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Oh-WOW)
    At and baked potatoes.
    Thanks!
    Think you may have accidentally deleted something in the above part?


    (Original post by do5)
    Reserving this for my review of John Burnet, bare with me.
    Are you doing a mini guide for JBH? Let me know if/when you do so I can put it in the opening post
    • 4 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ecosse_14)
    Thanks!
    Think you may have accidentally deleted something in the above part
    Thank goodness you proof read that.
    • Thread Starter
    • 43 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Oh-WOW)
    Thank goodness you proof read that.
    Yeah, I also had to correct countless grammatical errors whilst putting it in the opening post
    • 4 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ecosse_14)
    Yeah, I also had to correct countless grammatical errors whilst putting it in the opening post
    I did tell you that you'd have to do that!
    I spent ages doing it. I was far to lazy to fix the grammar as well.
    Sure that's what forum assistants are for! Might as well make you do some work :P
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Post-graduate accomodation 2011-2012
    IT appeares that quite a few of the post-graduate residencies don't have photos on the Uni's web-site. Can someone advise which is better in terms of size of the room and in-room and residence facilities: Dean Court, Eden Court or David Russel??? Would appreciate the advice, otherwise it's impossible to apply for accomodation. Thanks!!!
    • Thread Starter
    • 43 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by do5)
    x
    Thank you
    Added to the OP, if you update your post, please let me know.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Hi, I have a conditional offer so am aware that if I meet my grades I won't hear what accommodation I've got until August but I have a few queries about the application process. I've applied for single standard, [excluding Andrew Melville] and was wondering if it is therefore most likley that I will be in Uni Hall as this has the most single rooms, or whether there's just as much chance that I will be single/shared in somewhere like Reg's/Sallies/McIntosh?? I don't mind either way - what are people's experiences?
    Thanks
    • 4 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by soph_ss12)
    Hi, I have a conditional offer so am aware that if I meet my grades I won't hear what accommodation I've got until August but I have a few queries about the application process. I've applied for single standard, [excluding Andrew Melville] and was wondering if it is therefore most likley that I will be in Uni Hall as this has the most single rooms, or whether there's just as much chance that I will be single/shared in somewhere like Reg's/Sallies/McIntosh?? I don't mind either way - what are people's experiences?
    Thanks
    You'll probaly be in Uni hall as most of the single rooms in the other old halls are given to returning students (returners don't share, unless they request to do so) and those who ask for single rooms, usually get them. but Uni hall is a great place to live.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Oh-WOW)
    You'll probaly be in Uni hall as most of the single rooms in the other old halls are given to returning students (returners don't share, unless they request to do so) and those who ask for single rooms, usually get them. but Uni hall is a great place to live.
    Okay cool, thanks
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Hi there,

    I have an unconditional offer and accepted my place back in February. I also made my application for accommodation back then and had my application confirmed.

    Can anyone tell me when I should hear back, considering I am a Scottish student not living within commuting distance and with an unconditional offer?

    Thanks
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I know someone that called and they said the first batch will be notified on June 20th. But you could possibly be notified anytime up to september. You will probably find out late June or early July since you are unconditional.
    • Thread Starter
    • 43 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by amillar2210)
    Hi there,

    I have an unconditional offer and accepted my place back in February. I also made my application for accommodation back then and had my application confirmed.

    Can anyone tell me when I should hear back, considering I am a Scottish student not living within commuting distance and with an unconditional offer?

    Thanks
    You will hear back by the end of this month most likely, maybe next month
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Thanks, I hope so!

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: October 9, 2014
New on TSR

A-level results day

Is it about making your parents proud?

Article updates
Reputation gems:
You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.