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Best Scottish University?

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    (Original post by SRK.)
    your right about the fact that it does take a year longer to study medicine. But then that is counteracted by the fact that you gain two degrees. MBChb & Bsc(hons) . Plus only Oxbridge and Imperial college london offer this 6 year degree as well as St Andrews.
    Yes I realised this after I had written my reply, although I have discovered that Glasgow and possibly some others offer the option to do a one year science degree in the midst of the medicine course without it being compulsory.
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    which is the best business school in Scotland?
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    Probably Strathclyde.
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    Definitely Strathclyde
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    (Original post by Popppppy)
    Definitely Strathclyde
    You would say that
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    (Original post by Mr Dangermouse)
    You would say that
    What can I say, I'm biased
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    University of the West of Scotland

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    Oh god yes.
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    Is St. Andrew's or Edinburgh better in the Science and Medicine department? I want to study either biochemistry or pharmacology
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    (Original post by Juliak)
    Is St. Andrew's or Edinburgh better in the Science and Medicine department? I want to study either biochemistry or pharmacology
    Edinburgh's Medicine department is the BEST.

    Probably the best in the UK, only Oxbridge and Imperial and UCL can even dream of rivalling it. Ask anyone.
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    Dundee is also one of the top ones for medicine
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    (Original post by JakeE10)
    Dundee is also one of the top ones for medicine
    I actually wondered why hardly anyone mentions it. We can all agree that St. Andrews, Edinburgh and Glasgow are more prestigious, but after that Dundee and Aberdeen should come joint 4th.

    For Medicine and Dentistry Dundee is among the best in the UK, it's Bioscience Department has the greatest impact in the whole of Great Britain, Drug discovery is world leading and we have a couple of other subjects which are quite well regarded: Law, Art & Design, probably also Psychology. Also, according to the Times Dundee has the highest student satisfaction in the UK.

    Of cause I'm not biased or anything But seriously, Dundee is underestimated.
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    (Original post by Mr Dangermouse)
    In my opinion, Scottish education needs an overhaul from the roots. At the 15-18 level, it should move from the "rah-rah" level that higher provides across a number of subjects to a much deeper level across fewer subjects, because simply put, it sets up better for the future.
    In my opinion it's exactly the opposite. I'm from Germany where we study around 8-10 subjects in our last year with exams in 4 of these (slight differences between the states) and I really prefer this system.

    In the end it's the overall grade that counts and no one has to decide about his career at age 15/16 because at the end we can apply for any kind of course at university - English people are limited by their A-level choices. Yet, many young people only figure out what they really want to study quite late (I only decided after a gap year, one year after I left school).

    Some people argue that specialisation would be an advantage and people could follow their strongest interest. Well, when you do a specific course at university what you've done in any subject at school is usually taught within a couple of weeks. I'm doing Psychology at university and lecturers say that A-level Psychology is neither required, nor really well regarded.

    I'm in favour of a broad and diverse education that doesn't restrict pupils at a young age instead of limiting their choices for the doubtful benefit of a not really that useful specialisation.
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    (Original post by Sir Fox)
    In my opinion it's exactly the opposite. I'm from Germany where we study around 8-10 subjects in our last year with exams in 4 of these (slight differences between the states) and I really prefer this system.

    In the end it's the overall grade that counts and no one has to decide about his career at age 15/16 because at the end we can apply for any kind of course at university - English people are limited by their A-level choices. Yet, many young people only figure out what they really want to study quite late (I only decided after a gap year, one year after I left school).

    Some people argue that specialisation would be an advantage and people could follow their strongest interest. Well, when you do a specific course at university what you've done in any subject at school is usually taught within a couple of weeks. I'm doing Psychology at university and lecturers say that A-level Psychology is neither required, nor really well regarded.

    I'm in favour of a broad and diverse education that doesn't restrict pupils at a young age instead of limiting their choices for the doubtful benefit of a not really that useful specialisation.
    The problem with being forced to study a broad curriculum is that it discriminates against people who have weaknesses in certain areas. For example, people who want to study literature or languages having to take mathematics. I have a friend doing the Abitur and is sitting on a 2/15 for mathematics, while wanting to study modern languages. This puts so much pressure on her for her other subjects as she needs to compensate to be able to compete for university.

    Agreed, diversity is advantageous from a perspective of academic growth. The Scottish system isn't bad that way, anyway, since we sit 4-6 Highers in S5. If we want to take this subjects further we can continue them onto Advanced Higher. If we don't we can take 4-5 new Higher courses in S6. Theoretically we could end up with up to 11 subjects, if we desired, all relevant to university admission, since Highers are the necessary qualifications.

    I like the Scottish system since it's much more flexible than the English system. In the English system you don't have the flexibility to drop all your AS levels and start again with more AS levels, since universities only accept A2.
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    (Original post by GingerGoat)
    The problem with being forced to study a broad curriculum is that it discriminates against people who have weaknesses in certain areas. For example, people who want to study literature or languages having to take mathematics. I have a friend doing the Abitur and is sitting on a 2/15 for mathematics, while wanting to study modern languages. This puts so much pressure on her for her other subjects as she needs to compensate to be able to compete for university.
    Well, first of all there is a choice in most of the subjects. The only really fixed stuff is German, English and Mathematics, the rest is elective to some extent - I focused on social sciences and therefore only chose one more natural science (Chemistry). Then again no one is forced to take Mathematics as one of the core subjects which are examined with final exams.

    I really don't want to insult your friend or you in any way, but not being able to even pass simple (i.e. not core subject) Mathematics and having 2/15 is something which doesn't happen to that many people and it might raise some doubts over a person's suitability for higher education

    As I said the curriculum is partly elective and having to succeed at different frontlines prepares someone for university where even within a subject there are many distinctions. I'm glad I had it as in my current degree (Psychology) I need essay writing skills as much as Biology, Mathematics (statistics, yeeey) and a lot of other stuff. Wouldn't have thought so when I still wanted to do Politics in my last year of school
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    (Original post by Sir Fox)
    Well, first of all there is a choice in most of the subjects. The only really fixed stuff is German, English and Mathematics, the rest is elective to some extent - I focused on social sciences and therefore only chose one more natural science (Chemistry). Then again no one is forced to take Mathematics as one of the core subjects which are examined with final exams.

    I really don't want to insult your friend or you in any way, but not being able to even pass simple (i.e. not core subject) Mathematics and having 2/15 is something which doesn't happen to that many people and it might raise some doubts over a person's suitability for higher education

    As I said the curriculum is partly elective and having to succeed at different frontlines prepares someone for university where even within a subject there are many distinctions. I'm glad I had it as in my current degree (Psychology) I need essay writing skills as much as Biology, Mathematics (statistics, yeeey) and a lot of other stuff. Wouldn't have thought so when I still wanted to do Politics in my last year of school
    I was not saying it's a bad system, far from it. Especially where languages are concerned.* However I do refute that the Scottish system is any narrower than the German system. It's as broad as you want it to be.

    *I dropped modern languages quicker than Robert Green with a football at a World Cup My stance to French still hasn't softened. Slightly awkward when your favourite relative is French :lol:

    I wouldn't say it would raise doubts tbh. I know a lot of people who were basically forced to take mathematics at my school in Scotland and failed. Many of which are doing very well at university, because it has nothing to do with what they want to do. Especially since it can be so general and esoteric.

    Agreed, university is incredibly broad in terms of what is expected nowadays.
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    Hi guys, I've just seen a ranking where St Andrews figured higher than Oxford for English Literature, whereas Edinburgh was 19th (last year it was 10th). However, I've always heard people say Edinburgh is really good for the arts.
    What should I choose? St Andrews or Edinburgh? (I hold offers from both) I could also get into Glasgow, which this year seems even better than Edinburgh as far as the ranking is concerned. But, yet, I do not want my decision to depend upon abstract criteria, and if I had to choose between Edin and Glasgow I'd definitely pick Edinburgh. Not sure about St Andrews though.
    http://www.thecompleteuniversityguid...ables/rankings
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    (Original post by Filippo T)
    Hi guys, I've just seen a ranking where St Andrews figured higher than Oxford for English Literature, whereas Edinburgh was 19th (last year it was 10th). However, I've always heard people say Edinburgh is really good for the arts.
    What should I choose? St Andrews or Edinburgh? (I hold offers from both) I could also get into Glasgow, which this year seems even better than Edinburgh as far as the ranking is concerned. But, yet, I do not want my decision to depend upon abstract criteria, and if I had to choose between Edin and Glasgow I'd definitely pick Edinburgh. Not sure about St Andrews though.
    http://www.thecompleteuniversityguid...ables/rankings
    Stop worrying about arbitrary rankings and league tables and choose the university that appeals to you based on the place, the people etc. The fact that one place is ranked 10th one year and 19th the next year tells you how worthless these tables are. What happened, did the faculty building burn down?

    Visit them, see them for yourselves. Edinburgh is totally different from St Andrews.
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    (Original post by Sir Fox)
    Stop worrying about arbitrary rankings and league tables and choose the university that appeals to you based on the place, the people etc. The fact that one place is ranked 10th one year and 19th the next year tells you how worthless these tables are. What happened, did the faculty building burn down?

    Visit them, see them for yourselves. Edinburgh is totally different than St Andrews.
    Actually, I've just come back from Scotland (and seeing I live in Italy, it's been quite a journey) and I did visit both universities and cities. Still, I'm quite undecided. Edinburgh strikes me more as a very interesting and active city, with so many things going on and museums and literary history. But I must say that St Andrews seemed to me a wee more prestigious, meaning that it gave me the impression that students are "better taken care of", classes and lectures are smaller, the academic staff:student ratio is actually better (1 staff member per 12 students), and the same applies to student satisfaction which is much higher.
    Let's just say that if the University of St Andrews were in Edinburgh, it'd be the perfect place for me.

    I enjoyed and find it useful to visit them, but it's not enough to vanish my doubts: I already knew that St Andrews was very small and Edinburgh incredibly beautiful, but I cannot imagine how my everyday life will be before I actually live it.
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    (Original post by Filippo T)
    I enjoyed and find it useful to visit them, but it's not enough to vanish my doubts: I already knew that St Andrews was very small and Edinburgh incredibly beautiful, but I cannot imagine how my everyday life will be before I actually live it.
    In this case it comes down to whether you prefer a large city or a small place. Both are very beautiful places, one has more on offer, the other one is more peaceful, tranquil and picturesque. One is a close knit community, the other is more anonymous. I should add that from St Andrews you can get to Dundee within 30 min., Edinburgh in about an hour and Glasgow in 1.5 to 2 hours, so there's nothing keeping you from enjoying Edinburgh's museums, shopping etc. on the weekend

    In terms of prestige they are pretty evenly matched.

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Updated: May 5, 2015
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