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How to apply to Trinity College Dublin?

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    I'm an international student, from Dubai, currently doing my A Levels. I will be applying to universities in the UK and USA (and so have an SAT score of 1960). I was looking at universities and have kinda fallen in love with TCD.

    But I have no idea about the university, student life, the country, the application and admission process so would like some clarification. I intend on studying Economics.

    GCSE: 2A* 8A (Yes, I know I could have more A*s)
    AS: ABBB - Economics, Maths, History, Physics (Yes I know I messed up)
    A2 predictions: AAA - Maths, Econ, History (Yes, I know no A*s)


    Economics has a minimum requirement of 450 points and with my 3 A Levels (assuming I get 3 A's, I'd have 430, but this is excluding my AS in physics (Grade B)?)

    What's their stance on international students? I realise I'd have to pay more but hopefully tuition and cost of living won't be a problem. Do they have a quota on international students? Or is it like the UK where they can offer as many places as they want? Do international students get lower offers? Would I have to complete any language exams?

    How would I even apply? Is it like UCAS where I have to pick a certain amount of unis? Only one personal statement? Is there a deadline?

    Their international student requirements state :they 1300 from 2 subjects of the SAT Reasoning Test. That is incredibly low for a competitive uni. I'm assuming that's only the minimum requirement and not what's actually required? Any entrance exams?

    Most of the courses seem to be BAs. Is it like Oxbridge, Exeter and Durham where the BAs are only honourary?

    How is the university regarded in an international scope? What are it's facilities like?

    What's student life like? How many international students are there? Are there a lot of arabs or pakistanis? I'm a muslim and don't drink, would this pose a problem? What's the city like? Is it safe? What's the country like? Lots to do if you get a bit stir crazy in Dublin?

    Thanks in advance for any help!!!!!
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    Your B at AS is worth 60. Check this page: http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergr...culation/gcse/ You should be fine points-wise.

    You do know it's not straight Economics right? BESS means you're studying common modules in 1st year, and then specialising. In 4th year you can graduate in just straight Economics if you want, or keep it broader.

    Do you have a language other than English to at least GCSE level? You cannot get in without a pass in one. (Irish students study Irish, English and a third language as compulsory subjects for the whole 5/6 years so this is the reason).

    TCD has the highest number of international students, 1 in 8, a fact which jumps it up the rankings. Places are reserved in every single course for internationals, but you are still being pitted against Irish students as there will be more people applying both international and Irish than the course allows.

    You will have to pay full international fees unfortunately, unless you have been resident in an EU country for 3 of the last 5 years...no? If so the fees will be €2000. If not, full fees- which are definitely at least €10,000. You need to supply some sort of cert stating your profiency at English, though I'm a bit hazy on that. You don't get lower offers, they might technically be slightly lower (the system does favour those with A-Levels because Irish students do far more subjects) but they are formulated to be as equal as possible.

    Download the prospectus here http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergraduate/prospectus/ It will answer some questions in detail.

    It is NOTHING like UCAS. You apply online www.cao.ie Applications open in November for the following academic year on entry. They close Feb 1st but don't apply in the last week as their servers die under the pressure. http://www.cao.ie/index.php?page=downloads The first one in the table there is the CAO handbook- ESSENTIAL READING!

    No personal statement, no predicted grades. No names even, you're just given an anononymous number. You write down 10 (or just 1, or any number up to 10) of any course in any university. They can all be from one, they can all be different universities. None of the unis will know your other choices. They must be IN GENUINE ORDER OF PREFERENCE. So many people put second the thing they want most but don't think they can get and then if it turns out they have enough points for it, too bad, you never get offered anything below number 1 if you have the points for number 1, even if you reject that offer. You can change the order of your choices and add on/take away some at later stages.

    Our exams finish at the end of June. Results come out mid-August. 5 days later, CAO offers come out- using only your actual grades. They come out online at 6AM. Max points possible is 600, about 16 students out of 60,000 get that- that's how hard it is, way harder than getting A*A*A*A*. Any course over 500 is extremely competitive, luckily you're below that threshold. The first person to get the place in a course has the highest points. They work down the list and if a course has 30 places, the 30th and last person, their points become the 'points' of the cours,e ie. the minimum. It's also referred to as the cut-off point. Courses in Trinity tend to go up as demand increases for it, other unis tend to stay static or drop slightly. If you're wondering why English and History is far more points than Midwifery, Engineering and Comp Science, demand is the reason.

    What you're looking at there is matriculation requirements. These are extremely low. For example, for Irish students they require a pass in English, Maths, Irish, French and 2 other subjects. Yet this would give you a total points score of as low as 200 or so. Yet this is for courses that you haven't a hope of getting unless you have a load of A's and 570 points. So they are only a guide, they don't paint any picture of the university or its courses. Nobody but nobody gets in with grades like a load of passes.

    There is an entrance exam for Medicine, and also for Mature-entry courses and practical courses require portfolios. But nothing for BESS except you need English-proficiency certs.

    Yes, almost everything is a BA, even Science. This is an old-fashioned thing, but means nothing different than a B.Sci in practice. Not something to focus on. I think it's pretty cool!

    Extremely well, far and away the best in Ireland, 13th in Europe. It is ranked above St. Andrews and Warwick. This is extremely impressive because Trinity's funding and research funding isd much lower than the top universities, in some cases only a fraction. It was in debt and is now breaking even. It has a copyright library like Oxford and Cambridge- that is, the rights to every book printed in the UK and Ireland since 1801. So the libraries are massive, but most books are stored off-capus, which you can order. It beats the libraries of other unis here by a mile, but its opening hours are less than some.

    What you make it. Extremely active sports and societies. Two of the societies are hundreds of years old, have their own gothic buildings, and host debates with celebrity speakers. Very much old-world Trinity. Sports facilities are very good, but don't know much about them. The gym is new and top-class really. There's loads of choirs and orchestras too. The Student's Union is very active too. The Arts bulding where you'll be based is a bit Communist looking but it's fine.

    As I said, 1 in 8. There are 17,000 or so students, and it's a very compact campus. You could not have a better location. The majority of non-Irish students in the Arts block are British and American. In the Science/Medicine end, are Asians, Arabs etc. Now obviously there are a few but fairly sparse in arts-based subjects. There is an International Office that runs information evenings and events and stuff, and everybody is very welcoming. There is an Islam prayer room on campus..there's a church also, originally Protestant and now Catholic. No Mosque but not really the demand or room for one. The nightlife might seem a bit overwhelming, as most societies do base themselves around nights out etc. but rest assured, there's a lot to do without drinking. Even things like quizzes are very popular in societies. Your course would be more social than most as it's huge, but nobody is going to sneer at you or exclude you because you don't drink. You can still be involved in a lot.

    The city is very small, and very historic. It is about 1200 years old or so. It can look a bit grim as the weather is generally rainy or overcast- though as for coldness, not so much, it's quite mild. Now it CAN look dangerous because as it's small, it's easier to see homeless people and addicts than it is in places like London. Also, methadone clinics are all in the city centre- wonderful idea. Parts of the city aren't great- the sidestreets off O'Conell Street and Eden Quay, which is all the one area. The Southside where Trinity is is better. I've always felt safe there, coming homr from college, coming home from work, coming home from mights out- years and years of not feeling intimidated, threatened or being mugged.

    The country is beautiful. Dublin is on the coast, and has beautiful seaside villages, beaches and hills only a short distance away on a DART (electric train). The most beautiful rural parts of the country are Donegal, West Cork, West Kerry and Connemara (Galway). Connemara is Irish-speaking but soooo worth a visit. Have a nice google image search and see for yourself! Donegal is the furthest away, it's a 5 hour bus journey, but the rest are a good but closer, 3 hours on a train max. Train fares are good for students- about €30-40 depending on destination.

    Sure, you can take a trip up (or down) to coastal Dublin for the day, or down the country. Dublin itself is filled with galleries, musuems, lovely city parks and interesting tours and walking tours.
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    (Original post by StarsAreFixed)
    Your B at AS is worth 60. Check this page: http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergr...culation/gcse/ You should be fine points-wise.
    Is there anything I can do specifically to stand out? I know there's no essay to write.

    Oh, and I'm resitting a few AS modules, is that generally a problem?

    You do know it's not straight Economics right? BESS means you're studying common modules in 1st year, and then specialising. In 4th year you can graduate in just straight Economics if you want, or keep it broader.
    Yeah, just found that out. I can live with that, providing I get a degree in economics. I'm worried about the quantitative nature of the course though. I want a fairly maths related degree with modules in econometrics. I know it's a BA degree but is it all essay writing?
    Do you have a language other than English to at least GCSE level? You cannot get in without a pass in one. (Irish students study Irish, English and a third language as compulsory subjects for the whole 5/6 years so this is the reason).
    I have arabic at GCSE level and speak urdu fluently

    You will have to pay full international fees unfortunately, unless you have been resident in an EU country for 3 of the last 5 years...no? If so the fees will be €2000. If not, full fees- which are definitely at least €10,000. You need to supply some sort of cert stating your profiency at English, though I'm a bit hazy on that. You don't get lower offers, they might technically be slightly lower (the system does favour those with A-Levels because Irish students do far more subjects) but they are formulated to be as equal as possible.
    Hopefully the fees will not be a problem. Fingers crossed

    I have GCSE English Lit and Language, both at A grade

    Download the prospectus here http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergraduate/prospectus/ It will answer some questions in detail.
    Cheers!

    It is NOTHING like UCAS. You apply online www.cao.ie Applications open in November for the following academic year on entry. They close Feb 1st but don't apply in the last week as their servers die under the pressure. http://www.cao.ie/index.php?page=downloads The first one in the table there is the CAO handbook- ESSENTIAL READING!
    Ah, I see. Just been looking through the website and have found out that non - Eu students have a form to fill out? That they must mail to the international office in Dublin? Do I still have to go through CAO?

    No personal statement, no predicted grades. No names even, you're just given an anononymous number. You write down 10 (or just 1, or any number up to 10) of any course in any university. They can all be from one, they can all be different universities. None of the unis will know your other choices. They must be IN GENUINE ORDER OF PREFERENCE. So many people put second the thing they want most but don't think they can get and then if it turns out they have enough points for it, too bad, you never get offered anything below number 1 if you have the points for number 1, even if you reject that offer. You can change the order of your choices and add on/take away some at later stages.
    Ok thank you! I find it a bit strange but whatever Is there anything I can do to stand out?

    Our exams finish at the end of June. Results come out mid-August. 5 days later, CAO offers come out- using only your actual grades. They come out online at 6AM. Max points possible is 600, about 16 students out of 60,000 get that- that's how hard it is, way harder than getting A*A*A*A*. Any course over 500 is extremely competitive, luckily you're below that threshold. The first person to get the place in a course has the highest points. They work down the list and if a course has 30 places, the 30th and last person, their points become the 'points' of the cours,e ie. the minimum. It's also referred to as the cut-off point. Courses in Trinity tend to go up as demand increases for it, other unis tend to stay static or drop slightly. If you're wondering why English and History is far more points than Midwifery, Engineering and Comp Science, demand is the reason.
    I'm guessing though that a lot of people will have similar points? E.g 30 places for a course, 15 people have 600 but then the next 15 on the list have 590?

    Yes, almost everything is a BA, even Science. This is an old-fashioned thing, but means nothing different than a B.Sci in practice. Not something to focus on. I think it's pretty cool!
    Oh, ok, thanks, ignore my previous question!

    As I said, 1 in 8. There are 17,000 or so students, and it's a very compact campus. You could not have a better location. The majority of non-Irish students in the Arts block are British and American. In the Science/Medicine end, are Asians, Arabs etc. Now obviously there are a few but fairly sparse in arts-based subjects. There is an International Office that runs information evenings and events and stuff, and everybody is very welcoming. There is an Islam prayer room on campus..there's a church also, originally Protestant and now Catholic. No Mosque but not really the demand or room for one. The nightlife might seem a bit overwhelming, as most societies do base themselves around nights out etc. but rest assured, there's a lot to do without drinking. Even things like quizzes are very popular in societies. Your course would be more social than most as it's huge, but nobody is going to sneer at you or exclude you because you don't drink. You can still be involved in a lot.
    What is Dublin like in terms of diversity in general? Do you know if there's a mosque or islamic community in the city somewhere?

    Also, i've heard that demand for places in halls is very high, does that tend to be a problem? And if I do get a place in the halls, as a first year it's likely to be off campus? I want a good uni experience and if I'm not going to get into halls, I'm worried it might affect it :/ Also, not sure if I like the idea of getting up and having to take a bus to uni Would much prefer to walk it.

    The city is very small, and very historic. It is about 1200 years old or so. It can look a bit grim as the weather is generally rainy or overcast- though as for coldness, not so much, it's quite mild. Now it CAN look dangerous because as it's small, it's easier to see homeless people and addicts than it is in places like London. Also, methadone clinics are all in the city centre- wonderful idea. Parts of the city aren't great- the sidestreets off O'Conell Street and Eden Quay, which is all the one area. The Southside where Trinity is is better. I've always felt safe there, coming homr from college, coming home from work, coming home from mights out- years and years of not feeling intimidated, threatened or being mugged.
    How big is it in comparison to somewhere like London? Does it get boring? Or are things always happening, is there always something new to try?


    A big thank you for all the help!
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    (Original post by bob247)
    Is there anything I can do specifically to stand out? I know there's no essay to write.
    Nope! Just get enough points with some to spare.

    Oh, and I'm resitting a few AS modules, is that generally a problem?
    All of your grades need to be from the same year- ie. you can't present A-Levels done over two years. Have a look at the first link I gave you and the prospectus, it will make that clearer. My knowledge of AS etc. is fairly limited.

    Yeah, just found that out. I can live with that, providing I get a degree in economics. I'm worried about the quantitative nature of the course though. I want a fairly maths related degree with modules in econometrics. I know it's a BA degree but is it all essay writing?
    Statistics, Maths and Econometrics are all a part of 1st year. If you look at BESS in the prospectus I'm sure you can carry them on if you wish.

    I have arabic at GCSE level and speak urdu fluently





    Hopefully the fees will not be a problem. Fingers crossed

    I have GCSE English Lit and Language, both at A grade
    That's all fine




    Ah, I see. Just been looking through the website and have found out that non - Eu students have a form to fill out? That they must mail to the international office in Dublin? Do I still have to go through CAO?
    I think this form is to do with english proficiency. Students not presenting with IB or A-Levels I think apply to the uni directly, but as you're presenting A-Levels you just do the CAO and prove you have great English. Search international admissions on www.tcd.ie and email them to make sure, or else the CAO handbook will say.



    Ok thank you! I find it a bit strange but whatever Is there anything I can do to stand out?
    Nope, the system is all about fairness.


    I'm guessing though that a lot of people will have similar points? E.g 30 places for a course, 15 people have 600 but then the next 15 on the list have 590?
    No, there's nowhere near that number of applicants. This is why it wouldn't work in the UK- it would become a lottery. It works perfectly here, with only a fraction of applicants in comparison with UCAS. Only about 15 in the whole country get 600 in the first place. Very competitive courses will face that problem, but because our grades and therefore points (for example, 595 is possible, they go in 5's) are very specific (B1, B2, B3 etc. all with different points) this isn't as much a problem as you would think. The most that occurs is 3 people on the same points vying for the last place. They fire their numbers into a computer at CAO HQ and random selection determines who the place goes to. Sounds highly unfair but couldn;t be fairer really!




    What is Dublin like in terms of diversity in general? Do you know if there's a mosque or islamic community in the city somewhere?
    A LOT more than it used to be. The highest number is probably Polish, then Asians and other East-Europeans. Certainly Arabs and Indians etc. present but moreso in the UK than here. The older generation is a bit wary, but not unpleasant or anything. There are a few scumbags alright around with a 'they took our jobs'/racist view but not so much as to be an actual issue really. Definitely racism is not a problem. Ireland used to be extremely repressive and under the control completely of the Catholic Church. It has undergone massive emigration and has only undergone immigration in the last 15 years so while it is now diverse, these new communities aren't as integrated as they will be in the future. It is a bit of a shock to the older generation alright. Areas of the North inner city are almost completely Asian but there are no ghettoes as such so none of the social problems the UK has in that regard.

    http://www.islaminireland.com/dublin_mosques.html

    This might help? Dublin 8 is pretty central, you could walk it. (Slightly dodgy area to live in but you could get a great deal). The second one is fairly far out in comparison. At the bottom, you can see TCD has a prayer room. Would not recommend the one on Talbot street in the evening, not a good area to walk through.

    Also, i've heard that demand for places in halls is very high, does that tend to be a problem? And if I do get a place in the halls, as a first year it's likely to be off campus? I want a good uni experience and if I'm not going to get into halls, I'm worried it might affect it :/ Also, not sure if I like the idea of getting up and having to take a bus to uni Would much prefer to walk it.
    Yes, demand is very high. It is off campus, can be cycled, go on the luas (tram) or bus. Would be maybe an hour's walk but not a bad cycle at all. You only get on-campus accommodation from 3rd year upwards, though you have a huge advantage there over others because of your home address. They take that into account for Halls too. You can walk from Dublin 8, Dublin 1, 2 and 3 and parts of 4. Would be tough to get a great deal though.


    How big is it in comparison to somewhere like London? Does it get boring? Or are things always happening, is there always something new to try?
    Not really comparable. There are two main shopping streets, on either side of the river. These streets along with the streets around them and the bridges connecting the two comprise the city centre. There are loads and loads of other streets but generally they are not going to be places you'll be near. It would be more comparable to Manchester really. I've never found it boring- and I've seen more of it than most people going to college as I worked there and go on all my nights out there. Its such a buzzing, friendly city. It has a great atmosphere, and the people are so genuine. London I think is really too big for that kind of thing. Yes always things happening- has a big cultural background, plays etc...always exhibitions and arthouse films going on and there's always festivals like film festivals and loaddds of gigs and gig venues. In the last 10 years it's broadened sooo much, even just cuisine wise- you'll find no end of Chineses, Indians, Thai food, Japanese food, Kebabs etc, Mexican...as well as all kinds of fast food, and what we do best..lovely hearty pub food, like stews, casseroles, pies etc....
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    (Original post by StarsAreFixed)
    Nope! Just get enough points with some to spare.
    Alright, thanks!

    All of your grades need to be from the same year- ie. you can't present A-Levels done over two years. Have a look at the first link I gave you and the prospectus, it will make that clearer. My knowledge of AS etc. is fairly limited.
    Oh, ok thanks, the prospectus has made it pretty clear

    They will accept 3 A2s and one AS if it's done the preceding year.

    Only thing I didn't understand was:

    "Students may not combine grades achieved in different sittings of their GCE Advanced level (A2) examinations for the purpose of scoring. However, examinations taken in January and June of the same year are counted as a single sitting."

    So, does that mean they won't take resits into account?

    I think this form is to do with english proficiency. Students not presenting with IB or A-Levels I think apply to the uni directly, but as you're presenting A-Levels you just do the CAO and prove you have great English. Search international admissions on www.tcd.ie and email them to make sure, or else the CAO handbook will say.
    http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergr.../apply/non-eu/

    ??? Says there's a form there for undergraduate admission?

    Would make life easier tbh, only want to apply to the one uni in Ireland.


    Otherwise, thanks a lot mate! Made my life a lot easier
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    (Original post by bob247)
    "Students may not combine grades achieved in different sittings of their GCE Advanced level (A2) examinations for the purpose of scoring. However, examinations taken in January and June of the same year are counted as a single sitting."

    So, does that mean they won't take resits into account?
    Well when are resits taken? Since you're only using one A2 I doubt it woukd matter, you use either one score or the other. This applies moreso for multiple AS grades and multiple A-Level grades, ie. all or nothing- only from the one sitting, not mix and match. The reasoning here is because the Leaving Cert can only be done in one sitting, you can't repeat one subject..you hjave to repeat the whole thing.

    http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergr.../apply/non-eu/

    ??? Says there's a form there for undergraduate admission?

    Would make life easier tbh, only want to apply to the one uni in Ireland.


    Otherwise, thanks a lot mate! Made my life a lot easier
    It says the form is for medicine and dentistry. Medicine is restricted entry, and requires an entrance exam. Dentistry requires almost perfect points but no entrance exam as far as I'm aware.

    Drop that international@tcd.ie an email and ask them to clarify about the AS resit and if you need anything other than a CAO application and english profieciency proof.
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    does TCD look at your gcse results?
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    (Original post by aaek)
    does TCD look at your gcse results?

    In so far as if you don't have English, Maths and a foreign language at AS/A level they look at your GCSE's as you need passes in all three to at least GCSE level. However they won't be counted for points. It's just to matriculate.

    http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergr...culation/gcse/
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    (Original post by StarsAreFixed)
    Your B at AS is worth 60. Check this page: http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergr...culation/gcse/ You should be fine points-wise.

    You do know it's not straight Economics right? BESS means you're studying common modules in 1st year, and then specialising. In 4th year you can graduate in just straight Economics if you want, or keep it broader.

    Do you have a language other than English to at least GCSE level? You cannot get in without a pass in one. (Irish students study Irish, English and a third language as compulsory subjects for the whole 5/6 years so this is the reason).

    TCD has the highest number of international students, 1 in 8, a fact which jumps it up the rankings. Places are reserved in every single course for internationals, but you are still being pitted against Irish students as there will be more people applying both international and Irish than the course allows.

    You will have to pay full international fees unfortunately, unless you have been resident in an EU country for 3 of the last 5 years...no? If so the fees will be €2000. If not, full fees- which are definitely at least €10,000. You need to supply some sort of cert stating your profiency at English, though I'm a bit hazy on that. You don't get lower offers, they might technically be slightly lower (the system does favour those with A-Levels because Irish students do far more subjects) but they are formulated to be as equal as possible.

    Download the prospectus here http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergraduate/prospectus/ It will answer some questions in detail.

    It is NOTHING like UCAS. You apply online www.cao.ie Applications open in November for the following academic year on entry. They close Feb 1st but don't apply in the last week as their servers die under the pressure. http://www.cao.ie/index.php?page=downloads The first one in the table there is the CAO handbook- ESSENTIAL READING!

    No personal statement, no predicted grades. No names even, you're just given an anononymous number. You write down 10 (or just 1, or any number up to 10) of any course in any university. They can all be from one, they can all be different universities. None of the unis will know your other choices. They must be IN GENUINE ORDER OF PREFERENCE. So many people put second the thing they want most but don't think they can get and then if it turns out they have enough points for it, too bad, you never get offered anything below number 1 if you have the points for number 1, even if you reject that offer. You can change the order of your choices and add on/take away some at later stages.

    Our exams finish at the end of June. Results come out mid-August. 5 days later, CAO offers come out- using only your actual grades. They come out online at 6AM. Max points possible is 600, about 16 students out of 60,000 get that- that's how hard it is, way harder than getting A*A*A*A*. Any course over 500 is extremely competitive, luckily you're below that threshold. The first person to get the place in a course has the highest points. They work down the list and if a course has 30 places, the 30th and last person, their points become the 'points' of the cours,e ie. the minimum. It's also referred to as the cut-off point. Courses in Trinity tend to go up as demand increases for it, other unis tend to stay static or drop slightly. If you're wondering why English and History is far more points than Midwifery, Engineering and Comp Science, demand is the reason.

    What you're looking at there is matriculation requirements. These are extremely low. For example, for Irish students they require a pass in English, Maths, Irish, French and 2 other subjects. Yet this would give you a total points score of as low as 200 or so. Yet this is for courses that you haven't a hope of getting unless you have a load of A's and 570 points. So they are only a guide, they don't paint any picture of the university or its courses. Nobody but nobody gets in with grades like a load of passes.

    There is an entrance exam for Medicine, and also for Mature-entry courses and practical courses require portfolios. But nothing for BESS except you need English-proficiency certs.

    Yes, almost everything is a BA, even Science. This is an old-fashioned thing, but means nothing different than a B.Sci in practice. Not something to focus on. I think it's pretty cool!

    Extremely well, far and away the best in Ireland, 13th in Europe. It is ranked above St. Andrews and Warwick. This is extremely impressive because Trinity's funding and research funding isd much lower than the top universities, in some cases only a fraction. It was in debt and is now breaking even. It has a copyright library like Oxford and Cambridge- that is, the rights to every book printed in the UK and Ireland since 1801. So the libraries are massive, but most books are stored off-capus, which you can order. It beats the libraries of other unis here by a mile, but its opening hours are less than some.

    What you make it. Extremely active sports and societies. Two of the societies are hundreds of years old, have their own gothic buildings, and host debates with celebrity speakers. Very much old-world Trinity. Sports facilities are very good, but don't know much about them. The gym is new and top-class really. There's loads of choirs and orchestras too. The Student's Union is very active too. The Arts bulding where you'll be based is a bit Communist looking but it's fine.

    As I said, 1 in 8. There are 17,000 or so students, and it's a very compact campus. You could not have a better location. The majority of non-Irish students in the Arts block are British and American. In the Science/Medicine end, are Asians, Arabs etc. Now obviously there are a few but fairly sparse in arts-based subjects. There is an International Office that runs information evenings and events and stuff, and everybody is very welcoming. There is an Islam prayer room on campus..there's a church also, originally Protestant and now Catholic. No Mosque but not really the demand or room for one. The nightlife might seem a bit overwhelming, as most societies do base themselves around nights out etc. but rest assured, there's a lot to do without drinking. Even things like quizzes are very popular in societies. Your course would be more social than most as it's huge, but nobody is going to sneer at you or exclude you because you don't drink. You can still be involved in a lot.

    The city is very small, and very historic. It is about 1200 years old or so. It can look a bit grim as the weather is generally rainy or overcast- though as for coldness, not so much, it's quite mild. Now it CAN look dangerous because as it's small, it's easier to see homeless people and addicts than it is in places like London. Also, methadone clinics are all in the city centre- wonderful idea. Parts of the city aren't great- the sidestreets off O'Conell Street and Eden Quay, which is all the one area. The Southside where Trinity is is better. I've always felt safe there, coming homr from college, coming home from work, coming home from mights out- years and years of not feeling intimidated, threatened or being mugged.

    The country is beautiful. Dublin is on the coast, and has beautiful seaside villages, beaches and hills only a short distance away on a DART (electric train). The most beautiful rural parts of the country are Donegal, West Cork, West Kerry and Connemara (Galway). Connemara is Irish-speaking but soooo worth a visit. Have a nice google image search and see for yourself! Donegal is the furthest away, it's a 5 hour bus journey, but the rest are a good but closer, 3 hours on a train max. Train fares are good for students- about €30-40 depending on destination.

    Sure, you can take a trip up (or down) to coastal Dublin for the day, or down the country. Dublin itself is filled with galleries, musuems, lovely city parks and interesting tours and walking tours.
    Hi you seem to be the person to ask about TCD
    I read this to see about History and Political science but it says 525. However this isn't possible with Three A levels and an AS? Confused
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    No, once you go over 500 you really need 4 A-Levels, you'll fall short by 10 points with A*A*A* and A at AS. Don;t be fooled that it isn't asking for something perfect like 590- 525 is extremely high and difficult to get for any student. Less than 0.02% get 600 points compared to more than ten times that with perfect A-Levels, so it is much rarer for high grades to be achieved in general. Personally I got A1A2B2B2B2C1 which is well above average and was the second highest in my school (average is 350) but that's 500, quite a bit less than 525.

    Trinity is extremely competitive, and that course is veryy much so in demand. If you did 4 A-Levels you'd have a much better chance- for example A*AAB is 540, which is definitely safe. I understand that 4 isn't standard, I just wanted to get across that 525 isn't easy for any student, so it isn't discriminating. Is there any chance you can do another A-Level externally if your school doesn't offer the opportunity?
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    (Original post by StarsAreFixed)
    No, once you go over 500 you really need 4 A-Levels, you'll fall short by 10 points with A*A*A* and A at AS. Don;t be fooled that it isn't asking for something perfect like 590- 525 is extremely high and difficult to get for any student. Less than 0.02% get 600 points compared to more than ten times that with perfect A-Levels, so it is much rarer for high grades to be achieved in general. Personally I got A1A2B2B2B2C1 which is well above average and was the second highest in my school (average is 350) but that's 500, quite a bit less than 525.

    Trinity is extremely competitive, and that course is veryy much so in demand. If you did 4 A-Levels you'd have a much better chance- for example A*AAB is 540, which is definitely safe. I understand that 4 isn't standard, I just wanted to get across that 525 isn't easy for any student, so it isn't discriminating. Is there any chance you can do another A-Level externally if your school doesn't offer the opportunity?
    Ok thank you! No don't worry, i don't see it as discriminatory I was just a bit confused aha. I don't think so, I could do another AS and then I'd have two AS grades which could be 120 in total at B grades and I'd more than reach the 525 then but on the whole I might have to leave it though because not sure I could take the stress
    Thanks anyway!
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    (Original post by mynameiseve)
    x
    I did history & political science in TCD. Feel free to ask me anything about the course, or PM if you like
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    (Original post by StarsAreFixed)
    Your B at AS is worth 60. Check this page: http://www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergr...culation/gcse/
    It is NOTHING like UCAS. You apply online www.cao.ie Applications open in November for the following academic year on entry. They close Feb 1st but don't apply in the last week as their servers die under the pressure. http://www.cao.ie/index.php?page=downloads The first one in the table there is the CAO handbook- ESSENTIAL READING!

    No personal statement, no predicted grades. No names even, you're just given an anononymous number. You write down 10 (or just 1, or any number up to 10) of any course in any university. They can all be from one, they can all be different universities. None of the unis will know your other choices. They must be IN GENUINE ORDER OF PREFERENCE. So many people put second the thing they want most but don't think they can get and then if it turns out they have enough points for it, too bad, you never get offered anything below number 1 if you have the points for number 1, even if you reject that offer. You can change the order of your choices and add on/take away some at later stages.

    Our exams finish at the end of June. Results come out mid-August. 5 days later, CAO offers come out- using only your actual grades. They come out online at 6AM. Max points possible is 600, about 16 students out of 60,000 get that- that's how hard it is, way harder than getting A*A*A*A*. Any course over 500 is extremely competitive, luckily you're below that threshold. The first person to get the place in a course has the highest points. They work down the list and if a course has 30 places, the 30th and last person, their points become the 'points' of the cours,e ie. the minimum. It's also referred to as the cut-off point. Courses in Trinity tend to go up as demand increases for it, other unis tend to stay static or drop slightly. If you're wondering why English and History is far more points than Midwifery, Engineering and Comp Science, demand is the reason.
    Hi, sorry as well, because you seem like the person to ask about apps to TCD I've emailed the TCD admissions people, but they've just replied with the generic "please refer online to our international prospectus, etc"

    I'm a gap year student coming out with A*A*A*A and am looking to apply for Pharmacy. I've ALREADY achieved my results, and so should I still be going through CAO? because the whole 'lottery' thing doesn't make sense and I'm just quite confused right now!
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    (Original post by mynameiseve)
    Ok thank you! No don't worry, i don't see it as discriminatory I was just a bit confused aha. I don't think so, I could do another AS and then I'd have two AS grades which could be 120 in total at B grades and I'd more than reach the 525 then but on the whole I might have to leave it though because not sure I could take the stress
    Thanks anyway!
    I'm afraid you can only submit four grades for consideration, so you can't submit two AS as well as 3 A-Level. Otherwise you would have an unfair advantage. Pity you don't have many feasible options though
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    (Original post by chridhe)
    Hi, sorry as well, because you seem like the person to ask about apps to TCD I've emailed the TCD admissions people, but they've just replied with the generic "please refer online to our international prospectus, etc"

    I'm a gap year student coming out with A*A*A*A and am looking to apply for Pharmacy. I've ALREADY achieved my results, and so should I still be going through CAO? because the whole 'lottery' thing doesn't make sense and I'm just quite confused right now!

    I am not 100% certain you need to go through the CAO, the handbook should be able to tell you. Look up www.cao.ie and the handbook is the first one under 'downloads'. Alternatively, email the CAO. They're pretty helpful. There is a round zero that comes out at the end of July, for people that are not waiting on that year's results so can't help but think you would go through the CAO as normal except with your grades, then go through round zero. The good news is, as you're probably already aware, you have 580 points which is more than enough. My friend got it with 570 2 years ago.

    The points system is often referred to as a lottery alright. The basic premise is that the applicant with the highest points gets the first place on the course, and so on down the list. The applicant who gets the last place on the course, their points become the points of the course. Very few courses will actually fluctuate much year on year, demand is steady in Trinity. It works very well here because there's only about 68,000 applicants and our points and grades are very specific. It would of course be a huge failure in the UK. To me, the use of predicted grades and personal statements is mad.
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    I was born in england, but both my parents were born and raised in ireland, and i have an irish passport and dual citizenship.
    Does this mean if I want to go to university in the republic of ireland that I have to pay international fee's that a normal english person would have to pay, or would I pay the fee's that an irish person would pay?
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    Are you suddenly not an EU student? I understand that the UK despises the EU but here is a lovely benefit of it- it's in a LOT of my posts- EU students qualify as Irish home students- no international fees. There is a reg fee if €2k a year which is likely to rise in the next budget though. Nowhere in any posts or literature about Trinity will you find stuff about English people paying full fees- no idea where you've picked that up from. Same applied for most EU countries.
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    (Original post by LauraMxx)
    I was born in england, but both my parents were born and raised in ireland, and i have an irish passport and dual citizenship.
    Does this mean if I want to go to university in the republic of ireland that I have to pay international fee's that a normal english person would have to pay, or would I pay the fee's that an irish person would pay?
    Youll most likely be allowed to pay free fees. Even though i have a British passport (and u have an irish one) i only have to pay free fees when i was an undergrad.

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Updated: November 19, 2011
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