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Politics & IR - Warwick or York?

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    Hey all,

    I'm impossibly stuck between Warwick and York for Politics and IR. It's constantly playing on my mind and I don't know what to do. Would greatly appreciate any advice or comment.

    I love the course at York, and the city sounds lovely (never had the chance to visit), but I'm not sure about the atmosphere of the place and I'm not all that sure I would get along with people - on the whole, it seems I'd have vastly different opinions to many of them and I know that there are thousands of students there and that I'll find people I get along with, but it seems like I'd find less of them at York.

    With Warwick, I feel the people are more suited to me, and the course is good, but not as good as York's in terms of personal preference. The thing with Warwick is the city of Coventry and generally I'm worried I'd be more likely to get bored there coming from London where there's always loads going on. People are going to tell me that there are plenty of clubs, which is fine, but I'm not hugely a fan of clubbing at all. I'm more of a pub person, if anything, which I know York has plenty of. I've visited Coventry more than once, and it wasn't as bad as people make out, but I wouldn't like to spent the vast majority of my time there.

    Warwick also require a B in the AS grade you dropped, and I got a D, with an A in one module and an E in the second one (terrible paper, the whole class is resitting it), which I'm resitting and it's predicted that I'll get the B that Warwick want, but I accept that this will put me at a disadvantage if I do apply.

    So, what should I do, people of TSR?
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    Warwick all day long. Warwick has a very strong reputation for EPAIS, so you'd not be selling yourself short. If you're worried about getting 'bored' because you're from London, then York might not be the best choice for you. Warwick isn't the livelist university in the world, but it's still pretty decent. There are pubs everywhere, so I wouldn't let that bother you.

    You say that you prefer York's course, which is probably the most important aspect of choosing. What is it that you prefer? The Warwick course may be flexible?. Your poor AS grade probably won't matter much, since you're predicted to get a B, what were your other AS/s grades, since this might be a factor in whether, they think you're likely to achieve a B. What are your other choices?
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    (Original post by Tsunami2011)
    Warwick all day long. Warwick has a very strong reputation for EPAIS, so you'd not be selling yourself short. If you're worried about getting 'bored' because you're from London, then York might not be the best choice for you. Warwick isn't the livelist university in the world, but it's still pretty decent. There are pubs everywhere, so I wouldn't let that bother you.

    You say that you prefer York's course, which is probably the most important aspect of choosing. What is it that you prefer? The Warwick course may be flexible?. Your poor AS grade probably won't matter much, since you're predicted to get a B, what were your other AS/s grades, since this might be a factor in whether, they think you're likely to achieve a B. What are your other choices?
    I know that they both have very good reputations, and that if anything, Warwick's is slightly better. I only saw one pub anywhere near the university, whereas I saw far more clubs, which as I've said is actually something I'd rather avoid for the most part. Of course York will have these two, but it seems there are more pubs.

    York's course seems more philosophical and well rounded, for example offering modules on the Philosophy of the Criminal Law, Post-Conflict State-building and Green Politics in the final year. Completely different style to Warwick. The last one is a particular interest of mine and was what led me to York in the first place. Warwick's course certainly isn't bad and there are modules I know I would enjoy and of course I can always take modules from the Law and Philosophy departments, but I don't have to go to that trouble at York.

    My AS grades weren't grade, and not usually at the level of a top university (ABCD), but I have detailed medical letters and would be applying via the Warwick Awards Scheme or Access to York depending on which I do end up applying to. Also my predicted grades aren't bad (A*AB) and I've done loads of extra-curricular stuff related to politics. So I don't think it's entirely a lost cause. I'm also applying to Sheffield, East Anglia, Nottingham & Aberystwyth.
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    (Original post by Plonk)
    I know that they both have very good reputations, and that if anything, Warwick's is slightly better. I only saw one pub anywhere near the university, whereas I saw far more clubs, which as I've said is actually something I'd rather avoid for the most part. Of course York will have these two, but it seems there are more pubs.

    York's course seems more philosophical and well rounded, for example offering modules on the Philosophy of the Criminal Law, Post-Conflict State-building and Green Politics in the final year. Completely different style to Warwick. The last one is a particular interest of mine and was what led me to York in the first place. Warwick's course certainly isn't bad and there are modules I know I would enjoy and of course I can always take modules from the Law and Philosophy departments, but I don't have to go to that trouble at York.

    My AS grades weren't grade, and not usually at the level of a top university (ABCD), but I have detailed medical letters and would be applying via the Warwick Awards Scheme or Access to York depending on which I do end up applying to. Also my predicted grades aren't bad (A*AB) and I've done loads of extra-curricular stuff related to politics. So I don't think it's entirely a lost cause. I'm also applying to Sheffield, East Anglia, Nottingham & Aberystwyth.
    I think you'd be better of going for York based on everything you've told me, since, it's seems like Warwick's rep is possibly the only thing making this a difficult decision. I think Warwick does have alot more going on than York though, and you said that you were worried about being bored, esp being from London. I think in terms of general prestige, Warwick has quite abit on York, esp in certain career industries, but that's not too important.

    That's fair enough, you seem to prefer the York course by a country mile. I'm sure Warwick's EPAIS focuses alot on politicial theory and the likes of Hobbs, which is closely entwined with political philosophy. The Warwick course does seem to have aspects of political philosophy, and has a year in the US if that interests you. I'd say if the content of York appeals to you, go with that, but it's not unheard of for students, to hate the things that they thought they would love, and love the things they thought they'd hate, so don't rule it out just yet.

    Your AS grades aren't bad, I've seen people get Politics/IR offers from Warwick with similar. Your predicted grades are fine, and applying through the access scheme would only help. I'm guessing, but it seems like you have AAA, AAB, AAB ? and then another AAB? I'd probably say York would suit you more, but Warwick does have the pubs, you may just not have discovered them but sadly the course content doesn't cater to your needs.
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    York and Warwick have great Pol/IR courses, and the latter only maintains a marginally greater reputation. It's probably negligible.

    In terms of 'getting on' with people, why do you think you'd better suit Warwick to York? What exactly are you basing this on?

    From my own experience, political philosophy is outstanding at York, and if that's where your preference is, i wouldn't hesitate in applying on that premise alone. You could just apply to both though..

    (Original post by Tsunami2011)
    I think you'd be better of going for York based on everything you've told me, since, it's seems like Warwick's rep is possibly the only thing making this a difficult decision. I think Warwick does have alot more going on than York though, and you said that you were worried about being bored, esp being from London. I think in terms of general prestige, Warwick has quite abit on York, esp in certain career industries, but that's not too important.

    That's fair enough, you seem to prefer the York course by a country mile. I'm sure Warwick's EPAIS focuses alot on politicial theory and the likes of Hobbs, which is closely entwined with political philosophy. The Warwick course does seem to have aspects of political philosophy, and has a year in the US if that interests you. I'd say if the content of York appeals to you, go with that, but it's not unheard of for students, to hate the things that they thought they would love, and love the things they thought they'd hate, so don't rule it out just yet.

    Your AS grades aren't bad, I've seen people get Politics/IR offers from Warwick with similar. Your predicted grades are fine, and applying through the access scheme would only help. I'm guessing, but it seems like you have AAA, AAB, AAB ? and then another AAB? I'd probably say York would suit you more, but Warwick does have the pubs, you may just not have discovered them but sadly the course content doesn't cater to your needs.
    I find university applicants lecturing other university applicants on the supposed merits of this-or-that reputation or of this-or-that city curiously amusing. You could have at least feigned non-partisanship as well it's blindingly obvious you have a personal, overriding attachment to Warwick!
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    Just realised I haven't checked this thread for a while, and thought people may like to know that I ended up applying for both Warwick and York because I couldn't decide and was advised not to delay applying for much longer. Now just to wait for offers. Or rejections, which may be more likely..

    (Original post by Tsunami2011)
    Your AS grades aren't bad, I've seen people get Politics/IR offers from Warwick with similar. Your predicted grades are fine, and applying through the access scheme would only help. I'm guessing, but it seems like you have AAA, AAB, AAB ? and then another AAB? I'd probably say York would suit you more, but Warwick does have the pubs, you may just not have discovered them but sadly the course content doesn't cater to your needs.
    York, Warwick and Sheffield will ask for AAB if I do get offers, Nottingham may lower their standard AAB offer to ABB for me but that's not something I'm counting on and UEA has asked for ABB. I was probably a little too ambitious, but I'd rather that than regret where I applied to in the end.

    (Original post by Randell Turbruss)
    In terms of 'getting on' with people, why do you think you'd better suit Warwick to York? What exactly are you basing this on?

    From my own experience, political philosophy is outstanding at York, and if that's where your preference is, i wouldn't hesitate in applying on that premise alone. You could just apply to both though..
    I'm quite far to the left in my political thinking, and York seems very much the opposite to that in terms of people, representation of political parties on campus and the union itself. That alone wouldn't stop me taking up their offer should they give me one - university is about new ideas and experiences and that's something I'm looking forward to - but there are other universities where I think I'd find it easier to feel comfortable.
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    (Original post by Plonk)
    I'm quite far to the left in my political thinking, and York seems very much the opposite to that in terms of people, representation of political parties on campus and the union itself. That alone wouldn't stop me taking up their offer should they give me one - university is about new ideas and experiences and that's something I'm looking forward to - but there are other universities where I think I'd find it easier to feel comfortable.
    What gave you the impression that York is a rightist university? It has a thriving leftist community, with Labour Soc, People & Planet, Green Party, Amnesty and others all doing very well for themselves. A branch of Compass (leftist pressure group) is currently being set up here. If you want leftists, York has them in droves. That's not to say we don't have a fair few rightists too - although Tory Soc is more of a social than a political organisation.

    The current YUSU President is a leftist, who recently publicly condemned John Sentamu's comments on marriage and LGBT issues.

    Most significantly York has a great non-partisan political scene. York Student Think Tank, NGS and Debate Soc all provide excellent forums for developing different aspects of this.
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    (Original post by TruckBear)
    What gave you the impression that York is a rightist university? It has a thriving leftist community, with Labour Soc, People & Planet, Green Party, Amnesty and others all doing very well for themselves. A branch of Compass (leftist pressure group) is currently being set up here. If you want leftists, York has them in droves. That's not to say we don't have a fair few rightists too - although Tory Soc is more of a social than a political organisation.

    The current YUSU President is a leftist, who recently publicly condemned John Sentamu's comments on marriage and LGBT issues.

    Most significantly York has a great non-partisan political scene. York Student Think Tank, NGS and Debate Soc all provide excellent forums for developing different aspects of this.
    Comments from people who currently study Politics there and advice they've given me, things like the recent attempt to remove the position of a Women's Officer from the SU which was only narrowly defeated, and the fact that while I know there is a Green Party Society that's growing, it's rather small and there seem to be more societies based along rightist lines.

    That said, it seems the city of York itself is full of far more leftist groups than I'd realized when I made this thread. They seem small also, but very active, which is again surprising. I still feel I'd struggle more at York than elsewhere, but you've given me something to think about. Thank you for replying
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    (Original post by Plonk)
    Comments from people who currently study Politics there and advice they've given me, things like the recent attempt to remove the position of a Women's Officer from the SU which was only narrowly defeated, and the fact that while I know there is a Green Party Society that's growing, it's rather small and there seem to be more societies based along rightist lines.

    That said, it seems the city of York itself is full of far more leftist groups than I'd realized when I made this thread. They seem small also, but very active, which is again surprising. I still feel I'd struggle more at York than elsewhere, but you've given me something to think about. Thank you for replying
    No problem.

    I do just disagree with the people that you've spoken to at York. Given my (fairly extensive) experience of other universities, I would say York is at the very least in the middle of the range of top universities for ideological position, if not somewhat leftist.

    Also, I was somewhat involved in that Women's Officer campaign (on the retain side). It was not fought on left-right grounds, really. I'm afraid that more and more young people believe that formal, structural equality = effective equality, when it so obviously does not. I know of quite a few people generally of the left that campaigned for the position's abolition, or had no strong opinion either way.
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    (Original post by Plonk)
    Comments from people who currently study Politics there and advice they've given me, things like the recent attempt to remove the position of a Women's Officer from the SU which was only narrowly defeated, and the fact that while I know there is a Green Party Society that's growing, it's rather small and there seem to be more societies based along rightist lines.

    That said, it seems the city of York itself is full of far more leftist groups than I'd realized when I made this thread. They seem small also, but very active, which is again surprising. I still feel I'd struggle more at York than elsewhere, but you've given me something to think about. Thank you for replying
    I don't suppose you could help me out with deciding which university to go to?
    I've got an offer for Politics (BA) not Politics with IR, though.

    I'm deciding between Nottingham and York university. The former seems more related to practical politics, with some integration into ideology; but the main reason I've selected to do Politics is for political philosophy. I'd really like to study political philosophy in year 3, but the only thing holding me back from going to York is this (and I wonder if you could comment on these?):

    York seems to be more focused on political philosophy than Nottingham
    BUT York's year 3 modules seem to lack political philosophy, with only 3 modules I could find that interest me. This is the issue: do York provide more modules for year 3 students than it says on the website? For example, I've seen from a handbook that there are modules e.g. Marx and some about feminism; are these offered even though the website says it's not?

    York seems to have a worse reputation than Nottingham, particularly for Politics e.g. better research assessment? Nottingham seems to be improving, and York, stagnating at the the same level as the now (seemingly improving) Politics Department at York, with york going slowly towards 13/14 from 8/9 previous years ago (on average on league tables for politics and overall departmental standards). Do you know which university has a better reputation overall and in politics? I'm worrying because I've never chosen a choice that seems to be less qualitatively successful e.g. Nottingham is 74th in the world; York, 96th. Do you think York will improve in the years to come? What about Nottingham? I have a feeling that the reason applicants per place is almost double York's receipt at Nottingham is due to the campus, and less related to the course itself (obviously I can't prove it - it's just a hunch). York's ratio is 6:1, Nottingham's is 10:1; with less places at Nottingham (95) and York (141); do you think this says anything about the quality (or concentrative efforts of teaching) as the student base for Politics may be smaller at Nottingham?

    The accomodation at York seems to be poor, or can be (to a large extent) if you're put in a college (which apparently you don't choose?), e.g. apparently the rooms are small with really small bathrooms (which would be akward ), whereas Nottingham has very good accomodation - but en-suites have all been allocated I wonder what the chances of getting en-suite now may be e.g. some students may not get their predicted grades?

    The social scene at York seems poor, but that's a generalisation I suppose, I'm not really a 'clubber' so I shouldn't really care.

    I guess this is my biggest concern: which university is more superior in offering political philosophy (particularly in Year 3): York or Nottingham.

    Thanks a lot for reading this (it was longer than I had anticipated!).
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    (Original post by TruckBear)
    No problem.

    I do just disagree with the people that you've spoken to at York. Given my (fairly extensive) experience of other universities, I would say York is at the very least in the middle of the range of top universities for ideological position, if not somewhat leftist.

    Also, I was somewhat involved in that Women's Officer campaign (on the retain side). It was not fought on left-right grounds, really. I'm afraid that more and more young people believe that formal, structural equality = effective equality, when it so obviously does not. I know of quite a few people generally of the left that campaigned for the position's abolition, or had no strong opinion either way.
    PLEASE READ THIS BEFORE READING MY POST: I've already sent an identical post to another person on this thread, I'm just trying to ask this question to both of you to get a more extensive response (I hope you don't mind ).

    I don't suppose you could help me out with deciding which university to go to?
    I've got an offer for Politics (BA) not Politics with IR, though.

    I'm deciding between Nottingham and York university. The former seems more related to practical politics, with some integration into ideology; but the main reason I've selected to do Politics is for political philosophy. I'd really like to study political philosophy in year 3, but the only thing holding me back from going to York is this (and I wonder if you could comment on these?):

    York seems to be more focused on political philosophy than Nottingham
    BUT York's year 3 modules seem to lack political philosophy, with only 3 modules I could find that interest me. This is the issue: do York provide more modules for year 3 students than it says on the website? For example, I've seen from a handbook that there are modules e.g. Marx and some about feminism; are these offered even though the website says it's not?

    York seems to have a worse reputation than Nottingham, particularly for Politics e.g. better research assessment? Nottingham seems to be improving, and York, stagnating at the the same level as the now (seemingly improving) Politics Department at York, with york going slowly towards 13/14 from 8/9 previous years ago (on average on league tables for politics and overall departmental standards). Do you know which university has a better reputation overall and in politics? I'm worrying because I've never chosen a choice that seems to be less qualitatively successful e.g. Nottingham is 74th in the world; York, 96th. Do you think York will improve in the years to come? What about Nottingham? I have a feeling that the reason applicants per place is almost double York's receipt at Nottingham is due to the campus, and less related to the course itself (obviously I can't prove it - it's just a hunch). York's ratio is 6:1, Nottingham's is 10:1; with less places at Nottingham (95) and York (141); do you think this says anything about the quality (or concentrative efforts of teaching) as the student base for Politics may be smaller at Nottingham?

    The accomodation at York seems to be poor, or can be (to a large extent) if you're put in a college (which apparently you don't choose?), e.g. apparently the rooms are small with really small bathrooms (which would be akward ), whereas Nottingham has very good accomodation - but en-suites have all been allocated I wonder what the chances of getting en-suite now may be e.g. some students may not get their predicted grades?

    The social scene at York seems poor, but that's a generalisation I suppose, I'm not really a 'clubber' so I shouldn't really care.

    I guess this is my biggest concern: which university is more superior in offering political philosophy (particularly in Year 3): York or Nottingham.

    Thanks a lot for reading this (it was longer than I had anticipated!).
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    (Original post by theselfacknowledged)
    ...
    This link might help you.

    Given my knowledge of the two universities' Politics Departments, I would say York is stronger on Political Philosophy than Nottingham. That said, my knowledge of Nottingham's department is largely what I've got from their website.

    The problem with looking at what's available in terms of third year modules now, is that they have a habit of changing. They've changed to a huge degree during my time at York. It's better to look at the research interests of staff and the structure of the degree. If you looking at the teaching section of the profiles of each of the staff the above link provides, that might give you a better idea of what has been offered by the department recently.

    A friend of mine doing Politics & Philosophy at York has been able to do just Political Philosophy in years two and three - avoiding the more empirical side of things entirely. I would be surprised if you had a problem on that front.

    In terms of the prestige of the degree - do not worry. There is little between Nottingham and York on the whole, and not anything significant between them on Politics. Just don't take that into consideration.

    On the social side of things I'll quote what I've written elsewhere:

    (Original post by TruckBear)
    For theatre, cinemas etc - York's very good for its size. Check out this and this for theatre, and this for cinema.

    PS The pubs and bars in York are brilliant e.g. this, this, this, this, and this. And that lot just scratches the surface.
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    (Original post by TruckBear)
    This link might help you.

    Given my knowledge of the two universities' Politics Departments, I would say York is stronger on Political Philosophy than Nottingham. That said, my knowledge of Nottingham's department is largely what I've got from their website.

    The problem with looking at what's available in terms of third year modules now, is that they have a habit of changing. They've changed to a huge degree during my time at York. It's better to look at the research interests of staff and the structure of the degree. If you looking at the teaching section of the profiles of each of the staff the above link provides, that might give you a better idea of what has been offered by the department recently.

    A friend of mine doing Politics & Philosophy at York has been able to do just Political Philosophy in year's two and three - avoiding the more empirical side of things entirely. I would be surprised if you had a problem on that front.

    In terms of the prestige of the degree - do not worry. There is little between Nottingham and York on the whole, and not anything significant between them on Politics. Just don't take that into consideration.

    On the social side of things I'll quote what I've written elsewhere:
    Thanks so much for your reply!
    Do you know if you can do 'Marx' and other modules that aren't mentioned on the modules offered for the 3rd year but are still in the handbook? Or is the website the ones that are available, and thus imply modules like 'Marx' will only come up when available?

    Secondly, I believe the ratio of 2nd to 3rd year degree in terms of credit weighting is 2:3? The issue I have is, I love the 2nd year, but the 3rd year's attractiveness only satisfies me if around 3 of the modules actually stay - plus I'm not sure if the dissertation is a good (mandatory) module :\
    Nottingam's first year is poor, 2nd year, OK (not that interesting) and the 3rd year, quite good - but only around 2/6 of the modules (I'd expect to do assuming current availability = future availability) are explicitly what I'm interested in. Whereas in the York, the 1st year is OK (but better than Nottingham), the 2nd year is considerably good, and the 3rd year OK - around 2/5 modules (I'd expect to do assuming current availability = future availability)are explicitly to do with what I'm interested in, and the dissertation (1/5) seems a bit of a worry as I'm unsure on how well I'd do. I would say that the 3rd year at Nottingham > York, however. I dont know if we're allowed to take any mix of modules at York and Nottingham though; I hope you can take any arbitrary mix. BTW, when you specialise, must all the 3rd years modules be related? e.g. I'd specialise in political philosophy yet do criminal law and governing the global economy in the spring semester of the final year.

    Also, may I ask: if there is a marginal advantage of York over Nottingham (and it must be significantly low), then, would there be a massive opportunity cost of going to York e.g. due to York have a much worse global reputation, and York is stagnating, if anything declining, whilst Nottingham is rising from a lower position. So: would you go to York if the course structure was marginally better (assuming that all other factors the 2 universities are equal on e.g. environment)?
    Thanks again for your advice.

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