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Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
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    (Original post by KingMessi)
    Well, that's fair enough. Can you think of any topics in particular that you'd like to write books on? So you live in Scotland currently? You lived in Georgia? That must have been fascinating? I can imagine that you did; I couldn't imagine living in a East European nation...but I'm fairly unadventurous, I suppose. So America, New Zealand, Australia, etc?

    I'm the opposite - I'd really like to be known, somehow. My ambition ('dream' makes it sound far too unlikely. ) is to be a novelist, and a good one - but no luck thus far. Given I'm not likely to ever be able to write for a living, journalism appeals to me. Having said that, whilst I'd love to be good enough to write for a living, so long as I'm comfortable and have no especial monetary issues, I'd be happy.

    Haha, who knows - you may start a trend? :holmes:

    Hmm, give me a moment to deduce that one...('Bagillion' is not an accepted monetary unit. :pierre: )
    Well I like writing silly fictional stories, but chances of getting that published=0.
    Weird kooky academic books, I thought a nice one (probably been done before though) is like 'Trees in mythology and folklore', because most major Indo-European cultures have this 'tree of life', which bears fruit which makes you a. live longer b. gives you knowledge. So for example (although obviously the Bible isn't Indo-european) you have the Tree of Knowledge and the forbidden fruit, in Norse Mythology you have Yggdrasil (tree of life) and Idun with her golden apples (sound familar Medbh ?) who provides them to the gods to keep them young, and then there's obviously Greek mythology with the tree with the golden apples and Persian mythology has this tree too, who's apples give knowledge and life (strangely, like Yggdrasil the Norse tree, it has a little lizardy dragon thing trying to kill the tree). Of course this is a very brushed over explanation, there are plenty more cultures/ similarities that could be made, but it's things like that I find particularly interesting

    Yes I'm in Scotland at the moment, but going back east in a few weeks :holmes:
    Trust me, living in Georgia was a real eye-opener. It was so openly corrupt and difficult to get anything it was really quite sad, but everything else was amazing (maybe apart from their diet, which was SERIOUSLY carnivorous and alcoholic :sick:) Read back a few pages on this thread if you like to see where I ranted about their traditions/ culture which is very interesting
    they really hang onto their roots, but are a tad sexist....it's almost quite funny. Literally what men do is just stand around with their arms crossed smoking in groups haha. Once when I was on an archaelogical dig there, our well stopped working... no man rushed to fix it and freaked out Western style, instead 6 guys all stood in a circle tutting with their arms crossed and staring at it for like 20 minutes haha I went hitch hiking a lot too (it's how I like to travel) and you meet a lot of nut bars and nice people (my friend and I were given a litre bottle of beer since some guys didn't have enough room for us in their car )also got a lift in a beast of a Soviet coal truck.. shakiest thing I've ever been in haha. Got two christmases and two new years thanks to the orthodox calender and stayed in a flat with no heating and water never hotter than 20 degrees in winter


    go chase the dream Jack! It's worth a shot, like all these things. Deffo won't happen if you don't try.

    well in 'bum land' it might not be :pierre:
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    (Original post by Kalliope)
    Sorry, one of those incredibly creepy moments when a lurker pops up and posts...

    I'm thinking about going to a public lecture on Thucydides offered by Bristol Uni in June because I tend to like Classical History/ free lectures, but have not actually read anything by him as of this moment in time. Worth finding out more or is he really that objectionale?
    well as long as it's a kind fluffy lurker I don't mind

    Oh, go go go! His work is genius and a serious turning point when it comes to 'writing history'. His style has influenced lots of important authors, esp. historical/political writers like Thomas Hobbes etc He is a touchstone, but his writing is quite verbose and heavy; i.e not my thing, but very important and interesting in it's own right
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    (Original post by Frey)
    Well I like writing silly fictional stories, but chances of getting that published=0.
    Weird kooky academic books, I thought a nice one (probably been done before though) is like 'Trees in mythology and folklore', because most major Indo-European cultures have this 'tree of life', which bears fruit which makes you a. live longer b. gives you knowledge. So for example (although obviously the Bible isn't Indo-european) you have the Tree of Knowledge and the forbidden fruit, in Norse Mythology you have Yggdrasil (tree of life) and Idun with her golden apples (sound familar Medbh ?) who provides them to the gods to keep them young, and then there's obviously Greek mythology with the tree with the golden apples and Persian mythology has this tree too, who's apples give knowledge and life (strangely, like Yggdrasil the Norse tree, it has a little lizardy dragon thing trying to kill the tree). Of course this is a very brushed over explanation, there are plenty more cultures/ similarities that could be made, but it's things like that I find particularly interesting

    Yes I'm in Scotland at the moment, but going back east in a few weeks :holmes:
    Trust me, living in Georgia was a real eye-opener. It was so openly corrupt and difficult to get anything it was really quite sad, but everything else was amazing (maybe apart from their diet, which was SERIOUSLY carnivorous and alcoholic :sick:) Read back a few pages on this thread if you like to see where I ranted about their traditions/ culture which is very interesting
    they really hang onto their roots, but are a tad sexist....it's almost quite funny. Literally what men do is just stand around with their arms crossed smoking in groups haha. Once when I was on an archaelogical dig there, our well stopped working... no man rushed to fix it and freaked out Western style, instead 6 guys all stood in a circle tutting with their arms crossed and staring at it for like 20 minutes haha I went hitch hiking a lot too (it's how I like to travel) and you meet a lot of nut bars and nice people (my friend and I were given a litre bottle of beer since some guys didn't have enough room for us in their car )also got a lift in a beast of a Soviet coal truck.. shakiest thing I've ever been in haha. Got two christmases and two new years thanks to the orthodox calender and stayed in a flat with no heating and water never hotter than 20 degrees in winter


    go chase the dream Jack! It's worth a shot, like all these things. Deffo won't happen if you don't try.

    well in 'bum land' it might not be :pierre:
    i will reply to the other posts at some stage

    but your gap yah sounds so amazing :daydreaming:

    i am jelly of you :sadnod:
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    (Original post by medbh4805)
    i will reply to the other posts at some stage

    but your gap yah sounds so amazing :daydreaming:

    i am jelly of you :sadnod:
    I won't lie, I'm really glad I did it. Though my suggestion to anyone who wants to take a gap year is, don't go for one of these paid-for tailored 'come babysit for orphans in Tibet' things. Try arrange something independently if that makes sense, it makes all the difference, not to mention a hell of a lot more cheaper.

    when we at oxford u should come with me to Georgia during jollyhollydays for excavations! :fuhrer: (dunno if I'll be able to afford going back there again after this Summer though My boyf is hopefully going to Leiden to study Near Eastern Archaeology, so if anything it would be from London to Amsterdam...whch isn't quite as expensive or in the same league haha)


    edit: actually I'm so out of money I'm taking a flight to ISTANBUL then hitching to GEORGIA from there. :ashamed:
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    this thread makes me feel like my subject is so ordinary :cry2:
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    (Original post by Frey)
    Well I like writing silly fictional stories, but chances of getting that published=0.
    Weird kooky academic books, I thought a nice one (probably been done before though) is like 'Trees in mythology and folklore', because most major Indo-European cultures have this 'tree of life', which bears fruit which makes you a. live longer b. gives you knowledge. So for example (although obviously the Bible isn't Indo-european) you have the Tree of Knowledge and the forbidden fruit, in Norse Mythology you have Yggdrasil (tree of life) and Idun with her golden apples (sound familar Medbh ?) who provides them to the gods to keep them young, and then there's obviously Greek mythology with the tree with the golden apples and Persian mythology has this tree too, who's apples give knowledge and life (strangely, like Yggdrasil the Norse tree, it has a little lizardy dragon thing trying to kill the tree). Of course this is a very brushed over explanation, there are plenty more cultures/ similarities that could be made, but it's things like that I find particularly interesting

    Yes I'm in Scotland at the moment, but going back east in a few weeks :holmes:
    Trust me, living in Georgia was a real eye-opener. It was so openly corrupt and difficult to get anything it was really quite sad, but everything else was amazing (maybe apart from their diet, which was SERIOUSLY carnivorous and alcoholic :sick:) Read back a few pages on this thread if you like to see where I ranted about their traditions/ culture which is very interesting
    they really hang onto their roots, but are a tad sexist....it's almost quite funny. Literally what men do is just stand around with their arms crossed smoking in groups haha. Once when I was on an archaelogical dig there, our well stopped working... no man rushed to fix it and freaked out Western style, instead 6 guys all stood in a circle tutting with their arms crossed and staring at it for like 20 minutes haha I went hitch hiking a lot too (it's how I like to travel) and you meet a lot of nut bars and nice people (my friend and I were given a litre bottle of beer since some guys didn't have enough room for us in their car )also got a lift in a beast of a Soviet coal truck.. shakiest thing I've ever been in haha. Got two christmases and two new years thanks to the orthodox calender and stayed in a flat with no heating and water never hotter than 20 degrees in winter


    go chase the dream Jack! It's worth a shot, like all these things. Deffo won't happen if you don't try.

    well in 'bum land' it might not be :pierre:
    Oh, really? Well, you can still publish your non-fiction.

    Oh, okay, cool...so not the type one sees in the window at Waterstones? You know what - that does sound rather intriguing. All you need now is someone who has a grounding in both Literature and Psychology to collaborate with you, and then you have a fascinating must-read about the ubiquity of unique trees in world literature, and what that says about the human psyche... Anything else that comes to mind?

    Where are you moving to after Scotland? How do you mean, difficult to get anything? Even as someone who was only there for a short period (or would that aggravate the issue? :confused: )? Well, I'm sure they don't see themselves as sexist... That amuses me though - what happened in the end? I've never been hitch-hiking - were you not scared that one of your chauffeurs may turn out to be a maniac? :erm: That would kill me - I must have hot water! How did you manage?

    Well, I'm doing my best. I'm currently attempting to edit an entry for a writing competition, but...there are so many writers better than me. :erm:

    I wouldn't know; I'm not one of its inhabitants. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by such_a_lady)
    this thread makes me feel like my subject is so ordinary :cry2:
    woah woah woah...

    German is sexy. :rolleyes: I want to know German :cry:
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    (Original post by Frey)
    woah woah woah...

    German is sexy. :rolleyes: I want to know German :cry:
    That it is :sexface: Why think you this, out of interest?
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    (Original post by Frey)
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    (Original post by medbh4805)
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    I'm going to see a performance of Trojan women this week. My sister is playing Hecuba, it's her A-level drama performance. Oh, and I finally understood at least 1 classical literature reference, I read part of Antigone when we were studying Aquinas' Natual Moral Law in Ethics. You know it makes sense :yep:

    I'm writing this in a vain attempt to make myself seem half as smart/ cultured as everyone else on this thread at the moment


    (Original post by such_a_lady)
    this thread makes me feel like my subject is so ordinary :cry2:
    Same!
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    (Original post by KingMessi)
    Oh, really? Well, you can still publish your non-fiction.

    Oh, okay, cool...so not the type one sees in the window at Waterstones? You know what - that does sound rather intriguing. All you need now is someone who has a grounding in both Literature and Psychology to collaborate with you, and then you have a fascinating must-read about the ubiquity of unique trees in world literature, and what that says about the human psyche... Anything else that comes to mind?

    Where are you moving to after Scotland? How do you mean, difficult to get anything? Even as someone who was only there for a short period (or would that aggravate the issue? :confused: )? Well, I'm sure they don't see themselves as sexist... That amuses me though - what happened in the end? I've never been hitch-hiking - were you not scared that one of your chauffeurs may turn out to be a maniac? :erm: That would kill me - I must have hot water! How did you manage?

    Well, I'm doing my best. I'm currently attempting to edit an entry for a writing competition, but...there are so many writers better than me. :erm:

    I wouldn't know; I'm not one of its inhabitants. :rolleyes:
    heheh..thanks I like weird books like that you see. WE SHOULD WRITE THE GREATEST BOOK ON TREES ON EARTH! To be honest, if it was quite accessible then there's no reason it couldn't be a Waterstones seller Yes, bums... :pierre:

    Well my family lives in Scotland, suppose future career/significant other will be the deciding factors after uni :dontknow:

    Well basically, unlike our consumerist paradise, there are no big chain supermarkets. Everything that's not fruit/veg/meat is made in Russia and has god knows what chemicals in them...and there's like 2 choices of everything if you're lucky. No way would you find nice spices for curries or anything 'exotic' fruit wise/cheese wise. Their chocolate/sweets are **** too...word to the wise, Russian chocolate tastes like ****. Basically, what there is to buy is very very very very limited and often of poor quality. to buy tickets for anything/ order stuff is a very slow and clunky...they LITERALLY pretty much have no postal system to speak of; my 20 year old friends didn't even know their own post-code...that's how unused it is..

    Since everything is getting a bit more Westernised, women are starting to take a stand, but basically its not unusual for a woman to go straight from education to marriage at 19/21 to have a baby/housework and that's all; in the mountain villages it's the same as it was 400 years ago..

    My friend Mariam (40% or Georgian girls are called Mariam haha :P or Tamuna, Tamara, Nino...while the boys are all called David/Giorgi/Archili/Saba) once said to her AUNT that women should be able to do the same work as boys and have the same standing blah blah blah, and her aunt said to her 'How can you cross yourself (the gesture catholics/orthodox followers do) with such ideas?!' and then Mariam told her aunt that she doesn't cross herself because she's Atheist and apparently her aunt fainted on the spot, haha!

    basically I see sexism in two lights 'the oh you poor fragile flower, please cook and clean for me, I'll take care of you with my strong manliness, don't worry your sensitive womanly mind' and the 'you are less than human, I can treat you like **** because you're worthless' type. Thankfully Georgia is the former...but it can get on your nerves a bit (I caused a bit of drama when I insisted on helping digging the trenches with the guys instead of going home when some of our archaeology trenches got flooded....)

    it fixed itself in the end haha.....must be magic man-stares :holmes:

    haha, I always travel with a guy-friend, plus in that part of the world it's still quite normal to hitch-hike.

    haha we had to boil water on a ****ty gas stove...

    practice makes perfect, and who cares about the other people! :fuhrer:

    you so are :pierre:
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    (Original post by such_a_lady)
    That it is :sexface: Why think you this, out of interest?
    It's the sound of it... so.. :perv:

    Also I quite like comparative linguistics, German/anything from the Germanic branch is a must have

    for example:

    Asgard= where most of the Norse gods live, is broken down into two parts.. As+gard.

    As= thought to come from the P.I.E root '*ansu-', meaning spirit:

    This '*ansu-' root, supposedly comes to make the word 'As', which means God in Old Norse.

    From 'ansu' you also get 'Os' in Old English, which means 'God', which makes Old English names like 'Osgar (Oscar)' [Os+gar=God's spear], 'Osweald (Oswald)' [Os+weald= Power of God]. And 'Ans-' in Old High German.


    gard= thought to come from the P.I.E root '*gher-' meaning to 'grasp', 'enclose', an enclosure.

    So from this root we get Norse 'gard' which means enclosure, so basically 'Asgard' means 'spirit enclosure'

    the 'gher' root is also thought to be related to the words garden, horticulture and 'grad' in Russian, meaning city (so a big enclosure/guarded thing)


    that was a bit of a rant, but that's why I like German
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    (Original post by Niki_girl)
    I'm going to see a performance of Trojan women this week. My sister is playing Hecuba, it's her A-level drama performance. Oh, and I finally understood at least 1 classical literature reference, I read part of Antigone when we were studying Aquinas' Natual Moral Law in Ethics. You know it makes sense :yep:
    Ohhhh, you'll love it! It's awfy sad though, bring a tissue! :sad:

    tbh, the area in which I'm 'cultured' is fairly limited...
    (anything to do with maths/science= my downfall :ninja:)
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    (Original post by Frey)
    heheh..thanks I like weird books like that you see. WE SHOULD WRITE THE GREATEST BOOK ON TREES ON EARTH! To be honest, if it was quite accessible then there's no reason it couldn't be a Waterstones seller Yes, bums... :pierre:
    Evidently. Now there's a life's work if there ever was one. No, I suppose not - one may as well aim high. The problem is, were you to write a Waterstones bestseller it'd make you high-profile. :hmmm: As to your final comment, I have no words.

    (Original post by Frey)
    Well my family lives in Scotland, suppose future career/significant other will be the deciding factors after uni :dontknow:

    Well basically, unlike our consumerist paradise, there are no big chain supermarkets. Everything that's not fruit/veg/meat is made in Russia and has god knows what chemicals in them...and there's like 2 choices of everything if you're lucky. No way would you find nice spices for curries or anything 'exotic' fruit wise/cheese wise. Their chocolate/sweets are **** too...word to the wise, Russian chocolate tastes like ****. Basically, what there is to buy is very very very very limited and often of poor quality. to buy tickets for anything/ order stuff is a very slow and clunky...they LITERALLY pretty much have no postal system to speak of; my 20 year old friends didn't even know their own post-code...that's how unused it is..
    Oh, really? That must have been alien...and that can't be particularly healthy, if there are all sorts of chemicals in them...well, that may not be a bad thing. A more restricted choice could actually be quite positive, if the restricted choice is of good quality. It's a shame that the food was bad though - I think people who complain about the quality of British food are a bit spoiled. We're very fortunate. And we do do good chocolate - that's one thing that we can be praised for. It sounds like a very, very large culture shock.

    (Original post by Frey)
    Since everything is getting a bit more Westernised, women are starting to take a stand, but basically its not unusual for a woman to go straight from education to marriage at 19/21 to have a baby/housework and that's all; in the mountain villages it's the same as it was 400 years ago..

    My friend Mariam (40% or Georgian girls are called Mariam haha :P or Tamuna, Tamara, Nino...while the boys are all called David/Giorgi/Archili/Saba) once said to her AUNT that women should be able to do the same work as boys and have the same standing blah blah blah, and her aunt said to her 'How can you cross yourself (the gesture catholics/orthodox followers do) with such ideas?!' and then Mariam told her aunt that she doesn't cross herself because she's Atheist and apparently her aunt fainted on the spot, haha!
    Oh, okay - that seems to be a rising trend in so many non-Western nations at the moment. I bet the idea of doing that is very disconcerting for you? Or not so? Hahaha, they need to become more imaginative with names in that case. Portia, perhaps? Hermione? Ophelia?

    Wow...so they're a very religious country, then? Although, having said that, I think that my grandmother would react in a similar fashion if I proclaimed my atheism...:erm: Good for her, though...

    (Original post by Frey)
    basically I see sexism in two lights 'the oh you poor fragile flower, please cook and clean for me, I'll take care of you with my strong manliness, don't worry your sensitive womanly mind' and the 'you are less than human, I can treat you like **** because you're worthless' type. Thankfully Georgia is the former...but it can get on your nerves a bit (I caused a bit of drama when I insisted on helping digging the trenches with the guys instead of going home when some of our archaeology trenches got flooded....)

    it fixed itself in the end haha.....must be magic man-stares :holmes:

    haha, I always travel with a guy-friend, plus in that part of the world it's still quite normal to hitch-hike.

    haha we had to boil water on a ****ty gas stove...

    practice makes perfect, and who cares about the other people! :fuhrer:

    you so are :pierre:
    Ah, yes, the former being seen as 'positive sexism'. I can imagine that that must be infuriating for anyone who's come from the UK or the West, but hopefully the zeitgeist will shift very soon...good for you for helping them. :top:

    Yes, our stares can be magic. :awesome: That sounds sensible, and I suppose the media manipulates every horror story possible to make it sound far more recurrent than it actually is.

    Hmm, I wish that I had that confidence. :erm: I'll keep trying, though, I suppose...

    I can assure you that I'm not...
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    (Original post by Frey)
    Well I like writing silly fictional stories, but chances of getting that published=0.
    Weird kooky academic books, I thought a nice one (probably been done before though) is like 'Trees in mythology and folklore', because most major Indo-European cultures have this 'tree of life', which bears fruit which makes you a. live longer b. gives you knowledge. So for example (although obviously the Bible isn't Indo-european) you have the Tree of Knowledge and the forbidden fruit, in Norse Mythology you have Yggdrasil (tree of life) and Idun with her golden apples (sound familar Medbh ?) who provides them to the gods to keep them young, and then there's obviously Greek mythology with the tree with the golden apples and Persian mythology has this tree too, who's apples give knowledge and life (strangely, like Yggdrasil the Norse tree, it has a little lizardy dragon thing trying to kill the tree). Of course this is a very brushed over explanation, there are plenty more cultures/ similarities that could be made, but it's things like that I find particularly interesting
    I hate to keep bringing up Gaelic and 'Celtic' culture but did you know our entire alphabet is just trees? Instead of A, B, C, D, E, F, G, you have Ailm (palm), beith (birch), coll (hazel), dair (oak) etc etc...

    The origin is quite interesting. You've probably heard of Ogham. The script thats made up of a vertical line with slashes and dashes across it to signify letters. You find it on stones and things in Ireland, West Scotland and Wales. The Primitive Gaelic*-speakers saw their alphabet as representing trees - you can sorta see it: the vertical line is the trunk, and the letters are the branches. Anyway, thats how they got the tree names cos of course trees were sacred to druids (real ones, not new agers). Before the letters were inscribed on stone, some people reckon druids used them as hand signals, using tree shapes to represent the borrowed greek and roman alphabets.

    The Atlantic and Continental Celts were absolutely obsessed with trees. And its interesting that lots of scottish placenames with "kil" in the name (from Gaelic cille - church) if u go to the local churchyard you'll often find a yew tree thats older than the actual church. Its reckoned that when the Celts converted to Christianity they simply built a church beside an old sacred tree, as they didn't really wanna let go.

    It's interesting to note that the most significant Celtic Christian site in Scotland, Columba's Island of Iona, is reckoned to get its Gaidhlig name "I" (honestly, just Eee!!!) from the word "Iogh" which means Yew tree. So Eilean I means the Isle of the Yew Tree!!! And that of course is where we buried our kings til 1000 AD.

    Anyway, sorry for the rant, but I figured with your passion for trees and folklore, you'd be interested to hear...



    *I refuse to use the term Primitive Irish. When Atlantic Celtic arrived in the British Isles from Western Europe, it was spoken in Ireland and the western seaboard of britain, not just ireland as certain language nationalists like to think
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    (Original post by candide)
    I hate to keep bringing up Gaelic and 'Celtic' culture but did you know our entire alphabet is just trees? Instead of A, B, C, D, E, F, G, you have Ailm (palm), beith (birch), coll (hazel), dair (oak) etc etc...

    The origin is quite interesting. You've probably heard of Ogham. The script thats made up of a vertical line with slashes and dashes across it to signify letters. You find it on stones and things in Ireland, West Scotland and Wales. The Primitive Gaelic*-speakers saw their alphabet as representing trees - you can sorta see it: the vertical line is the trunk, and the letters are the branches. Anyway, thats how they got the tree names cos of course trees were sacred to druids (real ones, not new agers). Before the letters were inscribed on stone, some people reckon druids used them as hand signals, using tree shapes to represent the borrowed greek and roman alphabets.

    The Atlantic and Continental Celts were absolutely obsessed with trees. And its interesting that lots of scottish placenames with "kil" in the name (from Gaelic cille - church) if u go to the local churchyard you'll often find a yew tree thats older than the actual church. Its reckoned that when the Celts converted to Christianity they simply built a church beside an old sacred tree, as they didn't really wanna let go.

    It's interesting to note that the most significant Celtic Christian site in Scotland, Columba's Island of Iona, is reckoned to get its Gaidhlig name "I" (honestly, just Eee!!!) from the word "Iogh" which means Yew tree. So Eilean I means the Isle of the Yew Tree!!! And that of course is where we buried our kings til 1000 AD.

    Anyway, sorry for the rant, but I figured with your passion for trees and folklore, you'd be interested to hear...



    *I refuse to use the term Primitive Irish. When Atlantic Celtic arrived in the British Isles from Western Europe, it was spoken in Ireland and the western seaboard of britain, not just ireland as certain language nationalists like to think
    That's so interesting I love things like that.

    I also got a little Gaelic treat for you I think a variant for Oak in Gaelic is 'darach',(?) (this will still work with dair if I'm wrong ) and it's supposed Proto.Indo.European root is supposedly 'deru-', which means firm, strong steadfast (In Germanic [so also English] this 'd' becomes a 't', so 'tree', truce, tryggr in Old Norse [tree] and the word trust) So basically tree could mean 'strong, firm thing'. :rolleyes:

    What's very interesting is the word for tree in New Persian is درخت
    (daracht), almost identical to the gaelic for Oak; even though they won't be directly related you can see they are from the same root
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    (Original post by KingMessi)
    Evidently. Now there's a life's work if there ever was one. No, I suppose not - one may as well aim high. The problem is, were you to write a Waterstones bestseller it'd make you high-profile. :hmmm: As to your final comment, I have no words.
    I would use a pseudonym :ninja:



    (Original post by KingMessi)
    Oh, really? That must have been alien...and that can't be particularly healthy, if there are all sorts of chemicals in them...well, that may not be a bad thing. A more restricted choice could actually be quite positive, if the restricted choice is of good quality. It's a shame that the food was bad though - I think people who complain about the quality of British food are a bit spoiled. We're very fortunate. And we do do good chocolate - that's one thing that we can be praised for. It sounds like a very, very large culture shock.
    Very.. I lost lots of weight, and I was a bit too skinny to start with...looked pretty ill actually I appreciate the choice we have/ food in general now...oh my goodneeeeess! We live in paradise, seriously.





    (Original post by KingMessi)
    Oh, okay - that seems to be a rising trend in so many non-Western nations at the moment. I bet the idea of doing that is very disconcerting for you? Or not so? Hahaha, they need to become more imaginative with names in that case. Portia, perhaps? Hermione? Ophelia?

    Wow...so they're a very religious country, then? Although, having said that, I think that my grandmother would react in a similar fashion if I proclaimed my atheism...:erm: Good for her, though...


    haha well how religious/ traditional they are comes through in the names (I know Nino and Giorgi (St. George) are their fav saints, Tamara was a famous King (but really a woman :ninja:) and Mariam is obviously Mary as in Virgin Mary.
    But yeah, everyone has Orthodox icons in their house and if you pass a church you're supposed to cross yourself etc etc.




    (Original post by KingMessi)
    Ah, yes, the former being seen as 'positive sexism'. I can imagine that that must be infuriating for anyone who's come from the UK or the West, but hopefully the zeitgeist will shift very soon...good for you for helping them. :top:
    I bow to no man...


    (Original post by KingMessi)
    Yes, our stares can be magic. :awesome: That sounds sensible, and I suppose the media manipulates every horror story possible to make it sound far more recurrent than it actually is.

    Hmm, I wish that I had that confidence. :erm: I'll keep trying, though, I suppose...

    I can assure you that I'm not...
    I knew it :ninja:

    Go for it! If you made it you'll be laughing back on this moment :P

    that's not what your passport says :pierre:
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    (Original post by Frey)
    I would use a pseudonym :ninja:
    I'd expose you and leak vicious rumours about you to the tabloids. :ninja:


    (Original post by Frey)
    Very.. I lost lots of weight, and I was a bit too skinny to start with...looked pretty ill actually I appreciate the choice we have/ food in general now...oh my goodneeeeess! We live in paradise, seriously.
    Ouch, that must have been a very difficult time for you. May I ask why you were in Georgia? But you've recovered now, I hope? Yes, I can appreciate that - I've always thought so. People whinge about this country far too much. :mad:

    (Original post by Frey)


    haha well how religious/ traditional they are comes through in the names (I know Nino and Giorgi (St. George) are their fav saints, Tamara was a famous King (but really a woman :ninja:) and Mariam is obviously Mary as in Virgin Mary.
    But yeah, everyone has Orthodox icons in their house and if you pass a church you're supposed to cross yourself etc etc.
    Oh, that would make sense. I should have noticed Mariam and put two and two together regarding the etymology. :facepalm2: Did you find that easy? I guess you must have become used to it after a while...

    (Original post by Frey)

    I bow to no man...
    Because you don't have the flexibility?

    (Original post by Frey)

    I knew it :ninja:

    Go for it! If you made it you'll be laughing back on this moment :P

    that's not what your passport says :pierre:
    You know what?

    Haha, true...I'm actually fine-tuning my submission at the moment...

    Why do you have my passport? :ninja: :getmecoat: :erm:
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    (Original post by Frey)
    ...tree with the golden apples...
    Golden apples turn up everywhere, too. They're in Celtic mythology (growing on Avalon?), Greek, Norse, some fairy tales and probably somewhere else that I've forgotten. (Random interlude in conversation.)
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    (Original post by KingMessi)
    I'd expose you and leak vicious rumours about you to the tabloids. :ninja:
    noooooo.. :cry:



    (Original post by KingMessi)
    Ouch, that must have been a very difficult time for you. May I ask why you were in Georgia? But you've recovered now, I hope? Yes, I can appreciate that - I've always thought so. People whinge about this country far too much. :mad:
    Oh yeah, I'm fine now, thanks In winter it's more difficult because there's not so much fresh fruit/veg, but in summer they have lots of tastiness....but also they offer you lots off alcohol. Everyone in Georgia makes their own wine (some of the nicest wine I've had has been in Georgia) and also vodka stuff....from ANYTHING that has sugar in it: honey, apricot, peach, kiwi.... you name it and their vodka is pretty ****ing explosive..


    People whinge far far too much about Britain, it makes me very angry sometimes Some of the stories you hear from Georgians are horrible, things have only calmed down in the past 5 years or so....there was one boy who told me his great gran had two of her sons shot by order of the Soviet gov. and they sent her a letter requesting she pay for the bullets they used...

    Also my boyfriend's dad is a boxer, and apparently when he was little, the police were pretty much gangsters and would tell you to give them money or they would plant drugs on you and arrest you..but his dad beat the crap out of three of them when they tried it on him on the way to school haha.

    (Original post by KingMessi)
    Oh, that would make sense. I should have noticed Mariam and put two and two together regarding the etymology. :facepalm2: Did you find that easy? I guess you must have become used to it after a while...
    well they understand if you don't do it, you have to wear a headscarf when you go in a church though etc

    (Original post by KingMessi)
    Because you don't have the flexibility?
    I thought as a English Lit. student, you'd know that was a figure of speech... :unimpressed:


    (Original post by KingMessi)
    You know what?

    Haha, true...I'm actually fine-tuning my submission at the moment...

    Why do you have my passport? :ninja: :getmecoat: :erm:

    y i no have ur passport..... (:ninja:)


    I went to Georgia at first for archaelogical digs, but now for friends/fun
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    (Original post by anyone_can_fly)
    Golden apples turn up everywhere, too. They're in Celtic mythology (growing on Avalon?), Greek, Norse, some fairy tales and probably somewhere else that I've forgotten. (Random interlude in conversation.)

    It's so interesting isn't it? I wouldn't mind making an essay or something out of it if it fits into any future studies

    on a different note... I LOVE APPLES :drool:

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Updated: August 27, 2012
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