Hey there Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

AQA English Literature B 12th January 2012

Announcements Posted on
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Could anyone tell me what came up in the January 2012 exam please?
    I'm studying Pride and Prejudice for Section A
    The The Kite Runner, WH Auden, Browning for Section B
    Would help a lot!
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Perceptive)
    Could anyone tell me what came up in the January 2012 exam please?
    I'm studying Pride and Prejudice for Section A
    The The Kite Runner, WH Auden, Browning for Section B
    Would help a lot!
    I didn't do Pride and Prejudice (though I love it) so I can't help you with that. The part A questions for Kite Runner were:

    (i) How is the story told in Chapter 7?
    (ii) How is brotherhood conveyed in the novel? (or roughly this question)

    Section B questions were:

    (i) How do the writers use names to convey meaning?
    (ii) How do the writers use genre/form to convey meaning?

    Note that both would be difficult for Hardy -in particular the question on names- but as you are doing Auden and Browning, I don't think they would be as problematic.

    I took the exam in Jan 2012 for the first time but would be more than happy to help you if you need anything else! I've finished English for the year and am moping around trying not to revise any other subjects.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ad-astra)
    I didn't do Pride and Prejudice (though I love it) so I can't help you with that. The part A questions for Kite Runner were:

    (i) How is the story told in Chapter 7?
    (ii) How is brotherhood conveyed in the novel? (or roughly this question)

    Section B questions were:

    (i) How do the writers use names to convey meaning?
    (ii) How do the writers use genre/form to convey meaning?

    Note that both would be difficult for Hardy -in particular the question on names- but as you are doing Auden and Browning, I don't think they would be as problematic.

    I took the exam in Jan 2012 for the first time but would be more than happy to help you if you need anything else! I've finished English for the year and am moping around trying not to revise any other subjects.
    I actually liked the 'names' question for Hardy, I think that was one of the things that convinced me to answer that one. It was actually 'how characters are referred to' rather than just names, so there was plenty to talk about with regards to how he refers to Emma ("woman much missed", "haunter" etc)
    So no fear! They really do offer a way to answer it for each of the texts, it just may take some different thinking for different people.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by leha)
    I actually liked the 'names' question for Hardy, I think that was one of the things that convinced me to answer that one. It was actually 'how characters are referred to' rather than just names, so there was plenty to talk about with regards to how he refers to Emma ("woman much missed", "haunter" etc)
    So no fear! They really do offer a way to answer it for each of the texts, it just may take some different thinking for different people.
    I actually to agree with you (to an extent). I can see how Hardy would have been good for that but I talked more about the Thrush and how his lack of naming/reference to characters conveyed the unknown. So many people complained about that but I got my 90% so I'm happy! It was undoubtedly a curveball though, you'd never see that or a question similar on past papers - they entirely changed the style of questioning.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Hey, I am taking the exam in may and I was wondering if part 4 of the ancient mariner came up? Because if it did then every part has come up so they will have to do one again. Which means I can just looks at the markscheme for them all
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    does anyone have any notes for Auden's O where are you going?

    orrrr, for anyone who did enduring love and auden, what would you write for symbolism in part B?

    Thanks
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    O where are you going?" said reader to rider,
    "That valley is fatal when furnaces burn,
    Yonder's the midden whose odours will madden,
    That gap is the grave where the tall return."

    "O do you imagine," said fearer to farer,
    "That dusk will delay on your path to the pass,
    Your diligent looking discover the lacking
    Your footsteps feel from granite to grass?"

    "O what was that bird," said horror to hearer,
    "Did you see that shape in the twisted trees?
    Behind you swiftly the figure comes softly,
    The spot on your skin is a shocking disease."

    "Out of this house," said rider to reader,
    "Yours never will," said farer to fearer,
    "They're looking for you," said hearer to horror,
    As he left them there, as he left them there.

    Auden was very attuned to sound, and one way to understand this poem is simply to read it out loud. The sounds and the way it makes your mouth feel when his words are spoken are alone a grand justification for the poem. You can feel many of the contrasts in your mouth, in the vowel and consonant sounds.

    I am reluctant in many ways to assign more meaning to a poem than the way it sounds. But there is plenty of contrast to talk about in the imagery and structure of the poem too.

    The primary contrast is between an alive participant (the "rider", the "farer," the "hearer,") and a semi-dead asker of questions, who is sitting on the sidelines (the "reader," the "fearer," the "horror"). You could consider it the poet's critique of his audience if you wished--the poet descends into the maelstrom of human experience, while the reader, horrified, can only wonder.

    But that doesn't do full justice to the poem. As you read it think how the vowel sounds contrast. The starting place is between the speaker and the one spoken to (fearer to farer, etc) but there is so much more. What a lovely surprise in the second stanza to find consistent vowel sounds in a the context of contrasting consonants (and textures) when we move from "path to pass" and "from granite to grass."

    You can't boil this poem down without ruining it, so don't try. But as you revel in the sounds of the poem, think about the active character, who strikes out for the fatal valley where furnaces burn, and compare him to the fearful speaker of the first three stanzas.

    Then consider the active character's responses in the fourth stanza, particularly the third response, where the active character suggests that whatever it is that the passive character fears is looking for HIM, who is left behind with his fears. Is our active character, who runs fearless into the fire, the one who escapes it, while the passive character, who avoids it, is burned?

    Much, much more contrast in consonant and vowel sound, in image, in theme. The poem is an orgy, and I thank you for sharing it. Reading it has made my evening.


    For one thing, it has a rhythm and word pattern that are very musical and alliterative as well as rhyming in the 2nd and 4th lines. If you read it by emphasizing the stressed syllables, it all falls into a very appealing forward moving rhythm with sounds that reinforce each other and repeat with variations and rhymes. Part of the intention is to give you this nice experience of sounds. The pattern is taken from Irish and English folk poems that have the same pattern, i.e., "Where are you going, said ------- to --------, etc."

    As to the meaning, what I get from it is that three questions are asked in the first three stanzas and are answered in the final one. They have to do with a passive someone questioning an active someone about what they are up to, with the intention of inhibiting or discouraging them. The active retorts are much briefer and more to the point than the verbose questions and are characteristic of an active person who somewhat resents being questioned and refuses to be discouraged. Who it is that leaves them all there I am uncertain.
    I believe that the rider, farer and hearer are the same person, the "he" who left "them" there. I think the reader, fearer and horror are different people, or different aspects of the same person,

    At the beginning, the two people are about the same. Though the Rider is more active than the Reader, nobody faced with those two nouns (rider, reader) would be able to clearly say...this one is better. But when you get to Fearer and Farer, clearly the fearer is worse, and by the time we are at horror and hearer...well, nobody would want to take advice from a Horror! Also, the Horror pulls out all the stops in terms of trying to promote fear: the farer is being pursued by a bird, a figure, and has a shocking disease. Pure fear, without logical connection.

    To me, when the Rider says "out of this house," the Rider is an adolescent making his way. Later he taunts a bit: "you will never find the pass, and if death is stalking us, it is stalking you, not me. I am beginning my life."

    This may be over-reading it, but it is a fun, swinging poem about setting out, being young (at least at heart) and ignoring the nay-sayers.
    All of the "characters" in this poem are in reference to the speaker. The reader, fearer and horror are the internal voices that tell you to take the easy route, to settle, to be one of the crowd. The rider, farer and hearer encourage the self to discover, critically observe, and experience the world. The ominous three stanzas that feature the stagnant characters entice the reader with ingenious syllable measure and repeated consonant sounds, not to mention the rhyme scheme. In the last stanza, the speaker abandons inclinations to stay put, keep to the beaten path, fear the unknown, as he "left them there." Auden's ornate verse, of course, makes his take on it something worth commenting on.
    The purpose of writing the poem 'O Where are You Going?'is to advice the modern generation to go forward in life and discover the entire world as the paths of triumphs are looking forward for us , so we shall discover the world. We shall not care about the small danger as the negative characters still think that they will discourage us . Keep working hard.

    Hope this helps

    Does anyone know why 'As i walked out one evening' is a ballard

    Thanks
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    thank you so much, you're an actual lifesaver x

    maybe Auden's being ironic when he calls it a ballad? as I understand it, ballads are supposed to depict momentous, very profound tales of a protagonist, yet he portrays the lovers as insignificant and ridiculous. On the contrary, maybe it's a ballad in celebration of time - the strong, eerie transience of it.

    If you're looking for a more technical answer, it's a ballad because it conforms to a very strict, confined structure, with a rigid metre and rhyme scheme.

    I'm not 100% sure, but I hope it helps
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    can someone please tell me what Hardy poem came up for Section A part A in january 2012?

    im so scared for the exam and would be very grateful for any quick replies!
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by thatssoraven)
    did anyone do Hardy for section a? what did you take 'disappointed love' to mean?
    im guessing you took hardy for section A- could you possibly remember which poem came up for part A of section A? im so scared for this exam
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jahmet)
    gahh i was so ready for jessie cameron to come up for Rossetti which didnt come!
    Do you remember which Rossetti poem did come up? ''Winter: My Secret or Royal Princess?''
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joe Da Slim Slaney)
    Hey, I am taking the exam in may and I was wondering if part 4 of the ancient mariner came up? Because if it did then every part has come up so they will have to do one again. Which means I can just looks at the markscheme for them all
    Yes they all have, part 3 has been up twice I believe
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Does anyone have any idea what Tennyson poem may come up?
    I have a feeling it'll be Lotus eaters or Tithnous.
    I honestly have no idea what'll come up but if anyone else thinks it'll be any of the other poems please say!
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SophiePearman)
    Yes they all have, part 3 has been up twice I believe
    No.. Not all parts of the Rime have come up. Part 4 is yet to make an appearance.
    January 2009: Part 3
    June 2009: Part 1
    January 2010: Part 2
    June 2010: Part 7
    January 2011: Part 5
    June 2011: Part 6
    January 2012: Part 3 (TWICE).
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nazmunali)
    No.. Not all parts of the Rime have come up. Part 4 is yet to make an appearance.
    January 2009: Part 3
    June 2009: Part 1
    January 2010: Part 2
    June 2010: Part 7
    January 2011: Part 5
    June 2011: Part 6
    January 2012: Part 3 (TWICE).
    Oh that's really useful.
    thanks
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Any Browning notes would be appreciated.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tulsibulsi)
    im guessing you took hardy for section A- could you possibly remember which poem came up for part A of section A? im so scared for this exam
    yeah the voice came up for section a hardy x
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Just checking it's only chapters 6 and 7 that haven't come up for Section A Gatsby now? I really hope it's on one of those chapters and they don't repeat a different chapter!

    Anyone got a theory as to what type of questions will come up in Section B?!
    • 7 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ChocolatePearl)
    Do you remember which Rossetti poem did come up? ''Winter: My Secret or Royal Princess?''
    It was the second half of "The Convent Threshold", if I remember rightly. I didn't answer that question, though, I did the one on Mariner.

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?

    this is what you'll be called on TSR

  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?

    never shared and never spammed

  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide the button to the right to create your account

    Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: May 15, 2012
New on TSR

Student crowdfunds degree

Graduate raises £26,000 online for Masters course

Article updates
Reputation gems:
You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.