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What is a numerate degree?

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    I'm looking at a number of Investment Analyst and also Actuary roles and they ask for numerate or semi numerate degrees. However the requirements for some positions tend to be lower for those with numerate degrees. What degrees would generally be classed as numerate and which as semi numerate?

    My guess would be

    Numerate: Mathematics, Economics (at some university), Engineering, Physics

    Semi Numerate: Accounting & Finance, Chemistry, Computer Science


    Anyone disagree?
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    (Original post by Regent)
    I'm looking at a number of Investment Analyst and also Actuary roles and they ask for numerate or semi numerate degrees. However the requirements for some positions tend to be lower for those with numerate degrees. What degrees would generally be classed as numerate and which as semi numerate?

    My guess would be

    Numerate: Mathematics, Economics (at some university), Engineering, Physics

    Semi Numerate: Accounting & Finance, Chemistry, Computer Science


    Anyone disagree?
    Numerate: Maths, Engineering, Chemistry, Physics, CompSci

    Apart from Cambridge and LSE I am not really sure how numerate Economics is.
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    (Original post by fudgesundae)
    Numerate: Maths, Engineering, Chemistry, Physics, CompSci

    Apart from Cambridge and LSE I am not really sure how numerate Economics is.
    Amount of maths in degree Chem depends on module choice; at least that what the graduates said when I went for interviews (for another subject).
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    (Original post by twig)
    Amount of maths in degree Chem depends on module choice; at least that what the graduates said when I went for interviews (for another subject).
    I think it mainly depends on where you do it. Oxford and Imperial chemists will probably do just as much maths as graduates from some of these other degrees.
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    (Original post by fudgesundae)
    I think it mainly depends on where you do it. Oxford and Imperial chemists will probably do just as much maths as graduates from some of these other degrees.
    (The student I spoke to was from Ox.). But yeah, content beyond a-level maths will be covered I guess. Maths content at later years may depend more on module choice.
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    (Original post by fudgesundae)
    I think it mainly depends on where you do it. Oxford and Imperial chemists will probably do just as much maths as graduates from some of these other degrees.
    This is ABSOLUTE BULL****. Maybe its because you study chemistry but this is mad subject bias. My mum is a lecturer of maths at a mid-table uni and I can confirm this a just utter crap. Dont be so arrogant
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    (Original post by Sir KBS)
    This is ABSOLUTE BULL****. Maybe its because you study chemistry but this is mad subject bias. My mum is a lecturer of maths at a mid-table uni and I can confirm this a just utter crap.
    I think that depends on if you're comparing it with actual maths, or simply physics/engineering at mid-table unis
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    (Original post by AldrousHuxley)
    I think that depends on if you're comparing it with actual maths, or simply physics/engineering at mid-table unis
    Actual maths. He said maths graduates.
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    (Original post by twig)
    Amount of maths in degree Chem depends on module choice; at least that what the graduates said when I went for interviews (for another subject).
    For me I only got an 'option' choice in my 3rd year. These were 2 Organic papers, 2 Inorganic and 2 Physical. Obviously the physical papers has some maths in it especially physical option 2 since its quantum mechanics.

    Now each year there is a maths exam for those starting from 2009 onwards
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    (Original post by fudgesundae)
    Numerate: Maths, Engineering, Chemistry, Physics, CompSci

    Apart from Cambridge and LSE I am not really sure how numerate Economics is.
    I put Economics in the numerate category based on my own experiences and the fact I applied for a role stressing a 'numerate degree' and managed to slip through to the AC. It could be because I'm studying at postgraduate level (which is mostly calculus, topology, real analysis and applied mathematics).
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    (Original post by Sir KBS)
    Actual maths. He said maths graduates.
    Learn to ****ing read buddy :facepalm:

    Oxford and Imperial chemists will probably do just as much maths as graduates from some of these other degrees.
    Where did I say maths grads? ****ing retard.
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    economics at good universities have at least as much maths as in chemistry

    computer science is not a semi numerate degree... it's entirely based on maths
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    (Original post by fudgesundae)
    Learn to ****ing read buddy :facepalm:



    Where did I say maths grads? ****ing retard.
    Alright may have got that one wrong. You still need to stop this chemistry hype though.
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    I think Chemistry is more numerate than economics but the others are more numerate than Chemistry. I would say Chemistry is semi numerate
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    (Original post by Sir KBS)
    Alright may have got that one wrong. You still need to stop this chemistry hype though.
    Not may have got it wrong, got it massively wrong. Then proceeded to make yourself look like an imbecile.

    hype : Promote or publicize (a product or idea) intensively, often exaggerating its importance or benefits.

    I simply stated that it can contain as much maths as other mathematically rigorous degrees. Which it can depending on the modules you choose.
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    (Original post by fudgesundae)
    Numerate: Maths, Engineering, Chemistry, Physics, CompSci

    Apart from Cambridge and LSE I am not really sure how numerate Economics is.
    uhh, cambridge and lse teach economics more or less how it's taught everywhere else
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    (Original post by made_of_fail)
    uhh, cambridge and lse teach economics more or less how it's taught everywhere else
    Sorry I wasn't really sure, just going on what friends applying for economics have told me. They seem to think that the economics course at Cambridge is much more mathematically rigorous.
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    (Original post by Bloodbath)
    I think Chemistry is more numerate than economics but the others are more numerate than Chemistry. I would say Chemistry is semi numerate
    Most top unis require A Level Maths and Further Maths as prerequisites for entry. Is this the case with Chemistry?
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    (Original post by Regent)
    Most top unis require A Level Maths and Further Maths as prerequisites for entry. Is this the case with Chemistry?
    Is this really a requirement? I know people who have gone to Bristol, Warwick, Bath and UCL without FM A level.

    I think LSE and Cambridge do state that it is a preferred A level.
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    (Original post by fudgesundae)
    Sorry I wasn't really sure, just going on what friends applying for economics have told me. They seem to think that the economics course at Cambridge is much more mathematically rigorous.
    all good unis do some multivariable calculus and linear algebra (and no more for vanilla econ) just like cambridge and lse

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