Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey! Sign in to get help with your study questionsNew here? Join for free to post

Government and Politics Edexcel Exam Question prediction

This thread is sponsored by:
Announcements Posted on
    • Thread Starter
    • 5 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Hey,
    To all those sitting this exam (unit 1) on the coming Friday, looking at the past papers - I think I know what it may be.
    I just need help planning the answer and if someone could tell me what a liberal democracy is, that would really help.
    I looked at the mark scheme and it confused me more o.O

    So anyway, my prediction is on the democracy and participation section.
    I think it's gonna be:
    To what extent is the UK a liberal democracy?

    My reasoning, it'a come up in the spec, but no past paper o.O

    SO.... Any plans on how to answer this 25 mark question?
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Hey, also sitting this module.
    Wondering how sure you are on this prediction and whether you have also predicted the Pressure Groups question?
    • Thread Starter
    • 5 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Hi there ,
    I think that if there is a new 25 marker that is different to the any previous questions, it will take this format.
    I can't see it being any other thing.

    What topics are you revising btw?
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by I'll.Be.Back)
    Hi there ,
    I think that if there is a new 25 marker that is different to the any previous questions, it will take this format.
    I can't see it being any other thing.

    What topics are you revising btw?
    I'm just the man. My teachers have predicted this for the last two times, and the head of politics is hedging his bets on it yet again. I got 23/25 on this, and you can argue either way, so don't get down at me on this one, I don't love politics, I just do what I do to cover the mark scheme.

    To what extent is the UK a liberal democratic system? [25]

    Liberal Democracy balances the principle of limited government against the idea of popular consent. Its ‘liberal’ features reflect a belief in limited government as well as a network of internal and external checks upon government which are designed to guarantee liberty and afford citizens protection against the state. Its ‘democratic’ character is based on a system of regular and competitive elections, conducted on the basis of universal suffrage and political equality. Whilst the UK has made great strides to having a more liberal democratic system, it is not correct to say it is one.

    Some will argue that the UK system of politics is indeed liberal. Under Blair’s leadership following the 1997 general election victory, Labour brought in a series of reforms to fragment and spread power across the country. They did this with constitutional reforms; they devolved power in 1998 to the Welsh Assembly and the Scottish Parliament, and in 1999 to the Northern Ireland Assembly under the Good Friday Agreement. This showed a buck in tradition where power always resided with Westminster. The further devolution of power is highlighted with the election of a London Mayor and the London Assembly. The devolution of power to sub-national bodies have taken power away from central government and given more power to the people. The introduction of the Freedom of Information Act in 2005 allowed for greater transparency within the public sector; giving the public a ‘right of access’. Furthermore the Judiciary has become more independent of the other branches of government with the introduction of a new Supreme Court in 2009. This was important because it symbolizes the complete separation of the Judiciary from Parliament and together with the introduction of the Human Rights Act 2000; the rights of citizens have been enhanced. Measures introduced since 1997 has taken power away from the state and have given its citizens more rights, this matches up to liberal views, therefore the UK system could be considered liberal.

    The UK system could also be considered ‘democratic’. With the introduction of new sub-national bodies (Wales, N.I, Scotland, London), who operate under fairer, more proportional electoral systems, it has allowed for more proportional representation; fewer wasted votes and more representation for smaller parties. It has also not only allowed for more power to local people but has allowed for greater representation of society; the Welsh Assembly is now the only democratically elected body in the world that that an equal representation of both men and women. In parliament, Blair appointed the first ever black cabinet minister; Paul Boateng, and Cameron the first ever Muslim cabinet minister, Baroness Warsi. Furthermore, there are now greater numbers of openly gay ministers. A Labour manifesto pledge in 1997 was the greater use of referenda, and these were used to decide whether power should be devolved to Wales, N.I, Scotland and London. More recent referendums include, under the Conservative-led coalition, the referendum on the Alternative Voting which took place in May, 2011. The greater use of referendum could be used to argue that the UK is democratic, and as a form of direct democracy, has certainly enhanced the electorate’s power to influence decisions; this has also taken power away from parliament. Increasingly, there has been a move towards greater political pluralism. Through social media and communications, there has been a huge increase in pressure group activity and this has enabled citizens to air their views more frequently, for example NUS protests in London against the rise in tuition fees in 2010 and 2011. The coalitions’ introduction of fixed term parliaments has also made the UK more democratic; no longer can governments decide to call ‘snap elections’ when opinion polls are more favourable, the next general election will be in May 2015, or if parliament loses confidence, but ultimately, the ability of government to choose when to hold them has been taken away.

    However, whilst the current system shows signs of liberal democracy, it clearly does not conform to liberal democratic ideals. There is still no written constitution, one of their key objectives. The House of Lords remain unelected and despite Labour carrying out reform in 1999 to remove all but 92 hereditary peers, in October 2011 there were still 88. Peers are appointed by government and this sums up the undemocratic nature of the UK. Blair was very presidential in style, relying more on ‘spads’ like Alistair Campbell than elected politicians. This is backed up as cabinet meetings usually lasted as little as 45 minutes. His style illustrates an undemocratic style, whilst popular, he should be listening to fellow elected members of his cabinet. Additionally, First Past The Post remains distinctively undemocratic of the true wishes of voters and whilst there is greater representation of smaller parties in Europe, where sovereignty lies in the UK, in parliament, smaller parties are grossly underrepresented/ Conservatives and Labour overrepresented. As the previous explained, pressure groups form part of political pluralism, but in parliamentary terms, there is by no means a range of political representation, and it could be argued that for true democracy to exist, tolerance of rival parties and beliefs need to exist, especially in the legislature to ensure all groups are represented. Pressure Groups are not even listened to, millions marched through London in the ‘Stop the War’ coalition, but these protests were largely ignored. The status of the pressure group in question is also important, not all are listened to. The CBI can exert great power with any government due to their importance in business and their insider status; however the ‘Occupy’ movement are ignored. The media is controlled by a relatively small number of proprietors such as Rupert Murdoch who owns the Sun, Times and Sunday Times. It is not correct to call yourself a democracy if one person or organisation can have so much power over what people believe and a break up of this monopoly would enhance democracy. This greatly influences the public and restricts their ability to obtain a range of information with which to make judgements. One could argue however that we do not have much power over our affairs anyway. Global markets dictate economic policy and America dictates British foreign policy, it could be argued that the days of liberal democracy are numbered, and as seen in the eurozone debt crisis, countries need to act quickly without having the legitimacy from their people to make quick and contentious agreements on fiscal policy.

    In conclusion, the UK is not a liberal democratic system. Whilst it has key features of a liberal democracy, the current system does not conform enough to liberal democratic ideals for it to be considered one. The steps introduced by Labour such as devolution, improving information and the greater use of referenda certainly gave more power to the people and reduced the power of central government; noticeably very liberal. However, the fact that the House of Lords is still unelected and contains 88 hereditary peers highlights the undemocratic nature of the UK system. We still have no written constitution or Bill of Rights, HRA 2000 simply brought the UK into line with the European Convention on Human Rights. The continued use of First Past the Post emphasises how the UK is undemocratic, and whilst one could argue that the rejection of AV in May 2011 legitimises AV, it is most likely that the electorate want a fairer system than AV; AV would not have been as proportionate as say, STV. Reforms of the weaknesses noted above would make the UK a liberal democratic system, however in its current form it is not one.

    What do you guys think?
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by I'll.Be.Back)
    Hi there ,
    I think that if there is a new 25 marker that is different to the any previous questions, it will take this format.
    I can't see it being any other thing.

    What topics are you revising btw?
    I'm revising Democracy, Election and Pressure Groups (however, ideally I don't want to answer a PG question because I feel you need many examples and the questions tend to be tougher than the other two; Parties can be particularly boring and long winded, so I'm not bothering).

    You got any predictions for PGs or Elections pleaseee?

    Also, don't rest all your hopes on liberal democracy, representative democracy hasn't come up for as long I can remember, at least 4 papers?
    • Thread Starter
    • 5 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by srascal8)
    I'm just the man. My teachers have predicted this for the last two times, and the head of politics is hedging his bets on it yet again. I got 23/25 on this, and you can argue either way, so don't get down at me on this one, I don't love politics, I just do what I do to cover the mark scheme.

    To what extent is the UK a liberal democratic system? [25]

    Liberal Democracy balances the principle of limited government against the idea of popular consent. Its ‘liberal’ features reflect a belief in limited government as well as a network of internal and external checks upon government which are designed to guarantee liberty and afford citizens protection against the state. Its ‘democratic’ character is based on a system of regular and competitive elections, conducted on the basis of universal suffrage and political equality. Whilst the UK has made great strides to having a more liberal democratic system, it is not correct to say it is one.

    Some will argue that the UK system of politics is indeed liberal. Under Blair’s leadership following the 1997 general election victory, Labour brought in a series of reforms to fragment and spread power across the country. They did this with constitutional reforms; they devolved power in 1998 to the Welsh Assembly and the Scottish Parliament, and in 1999 to the Northern Ireland Assembly under the Good Friday Agreement. This showed a buck in tradition where power always resided with Westminster. The further devolution of power is highlighted with the election of a London Mayor and the London Assembly. The devolution of power to sub-national bodies have taken power away from central government and given more power to the people. The introduction of the Freedom of Information Act in 2005 allowed for greater transparency within the public sector; giving the public a ‘right of access’. Furthermore the Judiciary has become more independent of the other branches of government with the introduction of a new Supreme Court in 2009. This was important because it symbolizes the complete separation of the Judiciary from Parliament and together with the introduction of the Human Rights Act 2000; the rights of citizens have been enhanced. Measures introduced since 1997 has taken power away from the state and have given its citizens more rights, this matches up to liberal views, therefore the UK system could be considered liberal.

    The UK system could also be considered ‘democratic’. With the introduction of new sub-national bodies (Wales, N.I, Scotland, London), who operate under fairer, more proportional electoral systems, it has allowed for more proportional representation; fewer wasted votes and more representation for smaller parties. It has also not only allowed for more power to local people but has allowed for greater representation of society; the Welsh Assembly is now the only democratically elected body in the world that that an equal representation of both men and women. In parliament, Blair appointed the first ever black cabinet minister; Paul Boateng, and Cameron the first ever Muslim cabinet minister, Baroness Warsi. Furthermore, there are now greater numbers of openly gay ministers. A Labour manifesto pledge in 1997 was the greater use of referenda, and these were used to decide whether power should be devolved to Wales, N.I, Scotland and London. More recent referendums include, under the Conservative-led coalition, the referendum on the Alternative Voting which took place in May, 2011. The greater use of referendum could be used to argue that the UK is democratic, and as a form of direct democracy, has certainly enhanced the electorate’s power to influence decisions; this has also taken power away from parliament. Increasingly, there has been a move towards greater political pluralism. Through social media and communications, there has been a huge increase in pressure group activity and this has enabled citizens to air their views more frequently, for example NUS protests in London against the rise in tuition fees in 2010 and 2011. The coalitions’ introduction of fixed term parliaments has also made the UK more democratic; no longer can governments decide to call ‘snap elections’ when opinion polls are more favourable, the next general election will be in May 2015, or if parliament loses confidence, but ultimately, the ability of government to choose when to hold them has been taken away.

    However, whilst the current system shows signs of liberal democracy, it clearly does not conform to liberal democratic ideals. There is still no written constitution, one of their key objectives. The House of Lords remain unelected and despite Labour carrying out reform in 1999 to remove all but 92 hereditary peers, in October 2011 there were still 88. Peers are appointed by government and this sums up the undemocratic nature of the UK. Blair was very presidential in style, relying more on ‘spads’ like Alistair Campbell than elected politicians. This is backed up as cabinet meetings usually lasted as little as 45 minutes. His style illustrates an undemocratic style, whilst popular, he should be listening to fellow elected members of his cabinet. Additionally, First Past The Post remains distinctively undemocratic of the true wishes of voters and whilst there is greater representation of smaller parties in Europe, where sovereignty lies in the UK, in parliament, smaller parties are grossly underrepresented/ Conservatives and Labour overrepresented. As the previous explained, pressure groups form part of political pluralism, but in parliamentary terms, there is by no means a range of political representation, and it could be argued that for true democracy to exist, tolerance of rival parties and beliefs need to exist, especially in the legislature to ensure all groups are represented. Pressure Groups are not even listened to, millions marched through London in the ‘Stop the War’ coalition, but these protests were largely ignored. The status of the pressure group in question is also important, not all are listened to. The CBI can exert great power with any government due to their importance in business and their insider status; however the ‘Occupy’ movement are ignored. The media is controlled by a relatively small number of proprietors such as Rupert Murdoch who owns the Sun, Times and Sunday Times. It is not correct to call yourself a democracy if one person or organisation can have so much power over what people believe and a break up of this monopoly would enhance democracy. This greatly influences the public and restricts their ability to obtain a range of information with which to make judgements. One could argue however that we do not have much power over our affairs anyway. Global markets dictate economic policy and America dictates British foreign policy, it could be argued that the days of liberal democracy are numbered, and as seen in the eurozone debt crisis, countries need to act quickly without having the legitimacy from their people to make quick and contentious agreements on fiscal policy.

    In conclusion, the UK is not a liberal democratic system. Whilst it has key features of a liberal democracy, the current system does not conform enough to liberal democratic ideals for it to be considered one. The steps introduced by Labour such as devolution, improving information and the greater use of referenda certainly gave more power to the people and reduced the power of central government; noticeably very liberal. However, the fact that the House of Lords is still unelected and contains 88 hereditary peers highlights the undemocratic nature of the UK system. We still have no written constitution or Bill of Rights, HRA 2000 simply brought the UK into line with the European Convention on Human Rights. The continued use of First Past the Post emphasises how the UK is undemocratic, and whilst one could argue that the rejection of AV in May 2011 legitimises AV, it is most likely that the electorate want a fairer system than AV; AV would not have been as proportionate as say, STV. Reforms of the weaknesses noted above would make the UK a liberal democratic system, however in its current form it is not one.

    What do you guys think?
    I am scared that you are sitting the same exam as me, that's how good your answer is!
    Thanks so much though
    • Thread Starter
    • 5 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by srascal8)
    I'm revising Democracy, Election and Pressure Groups (however, ideally I don't want to answer a PG question because I feel you need many examples and the questions tend to be tougher than the other two; Parties can be particularly boring and long winded, so I'm not bothering).

    You got any predictions for PGs or Elections pleaseee?

    Also, don't rest all your hopes on liberal democracy, representative democracy hasn't come up for as long I can remember, at least 4 papers?
    I'm doing pressure groups too
    Just the two though o.O
    I reckon a 25 marker on assessing the factors to the success of a pressure group is on the cards. Any guesses yourself?
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by I'll.Be.Back)
    I'm doing pressure groups too
    Just the two though o.O
    I reckon a 25 marker on assessing the factors to the success of a pressure group is on the cards. Any guesses yourself?
    No idea, maybe a question linking Pressure groups with democracy, to what extent do they promote democracy?

    "factors to the success of a pressure group is on the cards. Any guesses yourself?" is that in the spec and hasn't come up before?
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Any other hints on what might come up?
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Does anyone have the June 2011 unit 1 questions?
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by peachesandcream77)
    Does anyone have the June 2011 unit 1 questions?
    Democracy - To what extent does democracy in the UK suffer from a 'participation crisis'?

    Pressure Groups - Is pressure group politics in the UK better described as pluralist or elitist? (that was a REAL BITCH of a question!)

    Parties - To what extent are the major UK parties internally united over ideas and policies (again, tough)

    Elections - Should the Westminster electoral system be reformed?


    Personally, I expect this paper to be 'easier', with either representative democracy/liberal democracy coming up/ for PGs perhaps 'to what extent have pressure groups become more important in recent years?'

    For elections, I'm unsure, its either going to be centred around FPTP or the effects of PR for General elections - however the latter came up in June 2010, so less likely, although, they've asked so much on FPTP, its risky, and could be tough imho
    • 3 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Omg I'm sitting this exam too.. So nervous. I just hope the paper turns out to be decent.
    Is it ok to just revise democracy, elections and pressure groups in detail. But not revise parties thoroughly. Parties just doesn't stay in my head.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alis-volatpropriis)
    Omg I'm sitting this exam too.. So nervous. I just hope the paper turns out to be decent.
    Is it ok to just revise democracy, elections and pressure groups in detail. But not revise parties thoroughly. Parties just doesn't stay in my head.
    I'm doing this for the third time! I've revised democracy and elections heavily, particularly FPTP benefits/negatives and pressure groups to a limited extent. I'm SO nervous as well!
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by srascal8)
    Democracy - To what extent does democracy in the UK suffer from a 'participation crisis'?

    Pressure Groups - Is pressure group politics in the UK better described as pluralist or elitist? (that was a REAL BITCH of a question!)

    Parties - To what extent are the major UK parties internally united over ideas and policies (again, tough)

    Elections - Should the Westminster electoral system be reformed?


    Personally, I expect this paper to be 'easier', with either representative democracy/liberal democracy coming up/ for PGs perhaps 'to what extent have pressure groups become more important in recent years?'

    For elections, I'm unsure, its either going to be centred around FPTP or the effects of PR for General elections - however the latter came up in June 2010, so less likely, although, they've asked so much on FPTP, its risky, and could be tough imho

    Thank you! Sorry to be a pain.. but do you have the A and B questions of democracy and pressure groups or could you possibly send me the link to where you found it from? I can't seem to find it anywhere!
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by peachesandcream77)
    Thank you! Sorry to be a pain.. but do you have the A and B questions of democracy and pressure groups or could you possibly send me the link to where you found it from? I can't seem to find it anywhere!
    Democracy - a) outline the key features of a referendum and b) apart from referendums, explain three ways in which democracy in the UK could be improved?

    PGs - a) Using examples, distinguish between promotional and sectional pressure groups.

    b) how and why do pressure groups seek to influence public opinion?
    • 3 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by srascal8)
    I'm doing this for the third time! I've revised democracy and elections heavily, particularly FPTP benefits/negatives and pressure groups to a limited extent. I'm SO nervous as well!
    3 times! Bloody hell! Are you a private candidate or something? And wow what grades have you been getting before? Are you improving? Good luck! So you haven't been revising parties in depth?
    Ah I got sociology on Thursday aswell.. Then this exam on friday.
    (fingers crossed) decent paper for each exam!!
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alis-volatpropriis)
    3 times! Bloody hell! Are you a private candidate or something? And wow what grades have you been getting before? Are you improving? Good luck! So you haven't been revising parties in depth?
    Ah I got sociology on Thursday aswell.. Then this exam on friday.
    (fingers crossed) decent paper for each exam!!
    No, aha, I took it in Jan 11, June 11, and now, I started AS in September 2010. I think the last paper was very difficult, so hopefully this is better! I've gotten around 60 both times, got 77 on unit 2 though!
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Thank you!
    Also, just wondering do we need to know power/authority? Because apparently they've taken that out of the specification.. ?
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by peachesandcream77)
    Thank you!
    Also, just wondering do we need to know power/authority? Because apparently they've taken that out of the specification.. ?
    who told you they've taken it out? a teacher? if they have then no you need not know it
    • 5 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Really don't want to do pressure groups in the exam as I really don't like the topic. Dreading this exam as there's so much to revise and i'm worried I'll forget everything

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: November 22, 2014
New on TSR

The future of apprenticeships

Join the discussion in the apprenticeships hub!

Article updates
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.