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The Revamped TSR Asperger's Society!

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Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
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    Hey guys.

    I haven't been diagnosed with Asperger's but I'm becoming increasingly concerned that I may have an ASD. My mum thought I did when I was very young because I was extremely sensitive to sound and touch, had obsessive behaviour and communcation skills that weren't developing as quickly as they should but she never got me checked out. I only found out she had these thoughts a few months ago and I've previously had niggling doubts that I'm not behaving as I should be. I've struggled with making eye contact but that isn't as much of a problem as it used to be. But whenever there are hoardes of people and loud sounds I crumble. Fresher's Week this year for me was a disaster. I just couldn't cope with the vast amount of change and noise and I pretty much went into my room and cried most of the time after trying to mingle with people. I've said things that are preceived rude by others and I have always struggled to interpret other people's intentions and emotions and what people want.

    Sorry for infiltraiting this thread, but yeah, I'm planning to see my GP and see what they think. I just want to know who I am so I can move forward.
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    (Original post by gillyhl)
    Hey guys.

    I haven't been diagnosed with Asperger's but I'm becoming increasingly concerned that I may have an ASD. My mum thought I did when I was very young because I was extremely sensitive to sound and touch, had obsessive behaviour and communcation skills that weren't developing as quickly as they should but she never got me checked out.
    This sounds familiar. Apparently, I hated having dirty hands. Nothing's changed. I still hate having dirty hands.

    Was talking to a friend of mine yesterday about something and asked him for some advice on an issue I'm having. The first he said was "I am not surprised that you have been diagnosed with Autism. I've known you for 9 years (:eek: ) and it's always been clear from the way you act". He did mention it years ago and I really couldn't see it. I can see it in him though. (He talks far too much!)
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    How is everyone doing? Since finishing exams, I have been so lazy :zomg:
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    (Original post by cpdavis)
    How is everyone doing? Since finishing exams, I have been so lazy :zomg:
    That's just naughty! No, really, hope they went well.

    I'm ok. For now anyway, that we have beautiful grey skies.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    That's just naughty! No, really, hope they went well.

    I'm ok. For now anyway, that we have beautiful grey skies.
    Thanks :hugs: I think they went well (although in one of my exams I saw someone actually cheating :rant: ) But due to me having such a stressful day, I didn't say anything :sadnod:

    Anything planned for today? Just typed up document for a parenting system in my department :yep:
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Is laughing at someone elses misfortune a product of Autism?
    Because I laugh at some of these youtube videos that people make where people deliberately hurt themselves or have accidents that actually look funny but painful, where other people like family/friends look at me and shake their heads.
    I don't know if it's BECAUSE of your autism, but my boyfriend has AS and he does this a lot. Laughs at things that I really don't find funny because they're cruel or of people getting hurt. I just thought it was a bloke thing tbh but maybe you're onto something!

    I know I've posted here before, but I need to ask, does anybody have any tips about getting a job with AS? My boyfriend has no GCSEs/other qualifications (although he has just SAT the maths and English exams but is not expecting to pass) and has never had a paid job. He has limited voluntary experience, and has been chosen to volunteer at the London Olympics, so it's not like he's incapable- it just seems that he is toxic as far as jobs are concerned, and nobody will touch him!

    It's getting us down because I've just graduated from uni and started working full time, and this has come as a shock to him because he's lonely now that he can't just come and spend hours every day at mine because I'm working. Also, we're wanting to move in together soon, but his housing benefit and some of his other money would be stopped if he moved in with me, meaning that I would have to pay a lot of his share and, while I don't really mind doing it in the short term, I imagine it would be quite tiring in the long term. Particularly as I wouldn't be able to save up for anything due to having to cover his costs.

    So basically he desperately needs a job. Anyone know of particular companies who are helpful/understanding? I know this sounds odd to say, but there's nothing "wrong" with him as such, like most others on this thread, you wouldn't know he had AS unless he told you. He just has no qualifications and a bloody stupid label that's preventing him from moving forward with his life.
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    (Original post by cpdavis)
    Anything planned for today? Just typed up document for a parenting system in my department :yep:
    I have a meeting this evening. On Sunday, I will be helping to volunteer at the local half marathon.

    I know I've posted here before, but I need to ask, does anybody have any tips about getting a job with AS? My boyfriend has no GCSEs/other qualifications (although he has just SAT the maths and English exams but is not expecting to pass) and has never had a paid job. He has limited voluntary experience, and has been chosen to volunteer at the London Olympics, so it's not like he's incapable- it just seems that he is toxic as far as jobs are concerned, and nobody will touch him!
    I'm in a similar situation. No-one will touch me because of lack of experience. I'm on the work programme and have had nothing but problems with them. They want me on ESA and I want to work.

    It's getting to the stage now where I'm pretty much complaining every time I see them. They can't be arsed to make reasonable adjustments and moan at me whenever I dare to complain about their ****ty treatment towards me.

    The government want people off benefits and back to work. How the hell can I get back to work when other people are putting obstacles in my way? Which I then get the blame for.

    it's clear that hardly anyone understands Autism and the sensory issues as a result. (pretty much all my senses are heightened)
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    I've just received a letter that says my son has been approved for DSA (yay) and has to go for an AoN. Does anyone have any suggestions of things to bring up or ask for? So far we have:

    1) Ensuite accommodation
    2) Laptop with course software so that he doesn't have to use the library
    3) Book allowance (library issues again)

    Main challenges are noisy social environments, change of routine, small talk, remembering to eat (!) and organising his day. He's planning to take his guitars which should help avoid a lot of 'meeting people' problems because it provides a ready made conversation about something he's interested in.

    Already talked to the University (Warwick) about support both generally and within his course and they seem to be very switched on and are making the right noises so far. For logistical (and financial!) reasons we're going to have to do the AoN in Belfast. If anyone out there knows anything about the centres there please let me know. Most centres seem to do mostly physical disability or dyslexia and we don't want to end up with someone trying to do a 'one size fits all' AoN.
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    (Original post by KittyKattyKaity)
    I've just received a letter that says my son has been approved for DSA (yay) and has to go for an AoN. Does anyone have any suggestions of things to bring up or ask for? So far we have:

    1) Ensuite accommodation
    2) Laptop with course software so that he doesn't have to use the library
    3) Book allowance (library issues again)

    Main challenges are noisy social environments, change of routine, small talk, remembering to eat (!) and organising his day. He's planning to take his guitars which should help avoid a lot of 'meeting people' problems because it provides a ready made conversation about something he's interested in.
    It doesn't matter if your son doesn't know what he needs. They will always mention stuff that you / your son wouldn't have thought about. For example, I have other disabilities and was given a piece of software which is a dictionary. Very useful.

    You may want to think about what help he gets now, if he gets help now.
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    Hi
    I think my brother has Aspergers and I'd like to know if the stuff he does is Asperger's stuff or just being a normal 14 year old.
    He doesn't know he has it as my mum said he sees things as right or wrong and would blame himself for it
    Thanks
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    Would i get a free laptop from DSA or not or is it for those with mobility issues or physical disabilities?

    I only have a chronic illness (which isn't included for DSA) and the specific learning difficulty (ASD,Aspergers)
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    (Original post by nmr1991)
    Would i get a free laptop from DSA or not or is it for those with mobility issues or physical disabilities?

    I only have a chronic illness (which isn't included for DSA) and the specific learning difficulty (ASD,Aspergers)
    It depends on your needs.

    Could do with some advice, please:

    I have noticed more and more than certain people don't understand me when I speak. I don't have an accent as such, it seems to be an Autism thing.

    I am now getting frustrated because I have to constantly repeat myself.

    I'm sight impaired; so forms of sign language aren't really an option. Apart from a few people who have non-verbal children due to disabilities, I don't know of anyone who actually knows and understands sign language.

    I am now looking into getting something similar to text-to-speech (TTS) to help me. I use a Motorola Xoom tablet. However, at 10.1", it can be a big to carry around.

    Anyone know what my options are please? it's not always practical to write everything down.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    It depends on your needs.

    Could do with some advice, please:

    I have noticed more and more than certain people don't understand me when I speak. I don't have an accent as such, it seems to be an Autism thing.

    I am now getting frustrated because I have to constantly repeat myself.

    I'm sight impaired; so forms of sign language aren't really an option. Apart from a few people who have non-verbal children due to disabilities, I don't know of anyone who actually knows and understands sign language.

    I am now looking into getting something similar to text-to-speech (TTS) to help me. I use a Motorola Xoom tablet. However, at 10.1", it can be a big to carry around.

    Anyone know what my options are please? it's not always practical to write everything down.
    What makes people not understand you? Do you mumble, do your words not come out clearly? Do you struggle saying certain words? Or is it just the tone of you voice?
    Oh and hey guys, i'm new here. I don't have aspergers but I have a lot of experience with people who do have it.
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    (Original post by Theoneoranro)
    What makes people not understand you? Do you mumble, do your words not come out clearly? Do you struggle saying certain words? Or is it just the tone of you voice?
    Oh and hey guys, i'm new here. I don't have aspergers but I have a lot of experience with people who do have it.
    My words don't come out clearly. In my head they do.

    It's only with a few people - my boss keeps asking me to repeat myself and there were a few incidents last year where a few people didn't understand me. One of these people, I don't understand either. With her it's her accent. (she's from Argentina. Her written and spoken English is fine)
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    My words don't come out clearly. In my head they do.

    It's only with a few people - my boss keeps asking me to repeat myself and there were a few incidents last year where a few people didn't understand me. One of these people, I don't understand either. With her it's her accent. (she's from Argentina. Her written and spoken English is fine)
    I don't think that has anything to do with aspergers. Some people with aspergers speak too loud or too quiet but that's different.
    I actually know how you feel because I used to suffer from the same thing in some of my teenage years. I fixed it by really practicing my speech, it took like 2 years for me to correct it fully. It's probably because you haven't communicated a lot with people in the past or you're shy or something. Anyway what I used to do was just say whatever came to my head and I just to say it. If I said it in a mumbling way or if my words got mixed up I just used to keep saying it until I got it right. I just said random things, I recorded it too sometimes (obviously I only did it when I was alone in my bedroom or something) It just takes a lot of practice to fix your speech. You could take speech lessons if you want. The reason some people understand you and others don't is because some people can't hear quite as well as others. But that doesn't matter because you should fix your speech so everyone can understand you. I know how annoying it is. But just remember to open your mouth wide when speeking and speek up, that's the main issue.
    I'm sure it doesn't have anything to do with aspergers though.
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    (Original post by Theoneoranro)
    I don't think that has anything to do with aspergers. Some people with aspergers speak too loud or too quiet but that's different.
    Some people with Autism do have speech problems.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    Some people with Autism do have speech problems.
    Yeah but it's not a part of autism, it's because they're shy, which obviously comes from their condition. But it's not actually a part of having aspergers syndrome (I don't think, i'm not sure about it though). The tone of voice has got to do with the condition, but I don't think mumbling has anything to do with it. Plenlty of people have speech problems, it doesn't mean they have aspergers.
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    (Original post by Theoneoranro)
    Yeah but it's not a part of autism, it's because they're shy, which obviously comes from their condition. But it's not actually a part of having aspergers syndrome (I don't think, i'm not sure about it though). The tone of voice has got to do with the condition, but I don't think mumbling has anything to do with it. Plenlty of people have speech problems, it doesn't mean they have aspergers.
    Can I suggest you actually look up Autism? Some people with Autism have NO speech at all.

    it's sod all to be with being shy.

    Some people with autism may not speak, or have fairly limited speech.
    That is from NAS.
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    In the past, I wasn't shy, I just didn't want to embarrass myself by talking gibberish. When I want to match the speed of a conversation or how fast they are talking then I try to speak that fast but words come out of my mouth that I just cannot control - therefore I think (actually I know)that it's part of my autism. But nowadays I don't try to match other peoples talking abilities, I just take it slow and easy and less uncontrolled words come out.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    Can I suggest you actually look up Autism? Some people with Autism have NO speech at all.

    it's sod all to be with being shy.




    That is from NAS.
    Okay I'm sorry for trying to help you (sarcasm)

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