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Constantly taking rests & naps throughout day...

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Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
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    I sleep about 10 hours a night so It's not like im not getting enough sleep, but I always feel the need to take naps/rests after activities such as shopping, going to my lectures, gym, cleaning/tidying... I must take 2-3 naps per day on top of my already above average sleeping hours. I've already had blood tests taken, nothing abnormal there, I eat and exercise plenty... I don't know what I'm doing wrong :/
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    You and me both. Let's do all the obvious things first. Caffeine? Getting enough iron? Fruit/vegetables?
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    (Original post by Lewk)
    I sleep about 10 hours a night so It's not like im not getting enough sleep, but I always feel the need to take naps/rests after activities such as shopping, going to my lectures, gym, cleaning/tidying... I must take 2-3 naps per day on top of my already above average sleeping hours. I've already had blood tests taken, nothing abnormal there, I eat and exercise plenty... I don't know what I'm doing wrong :/
    Sometimes oversleeping makes you even more tired. Why don't you try having like 7 hours sleep or something and see what happens?
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    Just out of interest - have you been tested for ME/Chronic fatigue syndrome?
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    ve detailed elsewhere how hard I worked in law school. But there was another secret to my success that I haven’t mentioned yet: the nap.

    In law school, I rented a carrel where I kept my books and studied in-between classes. I started learning about the benefits of napping and wanted to incorporate the nap into my routine. But alas, the law school didn’t really have any good couches to sprawl out on. So I improvised. I brought a pillow and blanket from home and put them under my carrel desk. When I was ready for a nap, I simply put my iPod headphones on, put on some nice relaxing music, and slipped under my carrel for a quick nap.
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    (Original post by iXcorre)
    Just out of interest - have you been tested for ME/Chronic fatigue syndrome?
    *sigh* you can't get tested for M.E/ CFS thus so far. It's diagnosed on exclusion of other positive tests and you have to have atleast x amount of symptoms for atleast six months the last time I've checked, it's not just about being fatigued/ excessive sleeping, there's the muscle spasms/pain/weakness, exercise intolerance (post exertional malaise) joint pain, headaches, brain fog ) plus a weaknened immune system - most who suffer have these symptoms, and they usually have a few of, noise sensitivity, photosensitivity, enlarged lymph nodes, food sensitivity etc.

    Back to answering the OP. If you just oversleep it's just called hypersomnia, this can be caused by many, many conditions. If there are no other symptoms and you go to the doc and the bloods comes back normal, then it could be (as someone else has said) from oversleeping, this is thought to be because you've got your body into a cycle of sleeping for longer, but less deeply. You will know if this is the case, if you can adjust to a normal sleep patern without napping. Although there's different advise, on how to do it. There's the cold turkey approach, or there's the gradual approach, i.e by reduing sleep by 15 mins a week at a time.
    If your bloods are normal and you can't get out of napping it could be a sleeping disorder, the most severe include sleep apnea and that it could be the start of narcolepsy, to the lot less serious restless leg syndrome but it could just be idiopathic hypersomnia, it's cause is unknown, but can be induced by just banging your head really hard apparently.

    On the other hand I've heard a doc say taking a daily power nap as a teen is helpful and normal, so if it doesn't affect your ability to carry out your life, and you can go without them when you try, then I wouldn't worry.

    P.S I'm not a doctor!
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    (Original post by Lewk)
    I sleep about 10 hours a night so It's not like im not getting enough sleep, but I always feel the need to take naps/rests after activities such as shopping, going to my lectures, gym, cleaning/tidying... I must take 2-3 naps per day on top of my already above average sleeping hours. I've already had blood tests taken, nothing abnormal there, I eat and exercise plenty... I don't know what I'm doing wrong :/
    Discipline yourself.

    I am constantly knackered and would love to nap twice a day, but I can't. Get a routine in your life!
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    Discipline yourself.

    I am constantly knackered and would love to nap twice a day, but I can't. Get a routine in your life!
    If you're actually 'constantly knackered', then it's probably not a good idea to just force yourself into it all the time without finding out what's wrong. Unless you're exaggerating, in which case your situation isn't that relevant to the OP. :dontknow:
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    (Original post by Amwazicles)
    If you're actually 'constantly knackered', then it's probably not a good idea to just force yourself into it all the time without finding out what's wrong. Unless you're exaggerating, in which case your situation isn't that relevant to the OP. :dontknow:
    I already know what's wrong. I'm a final year medical student with my qualifying exams in less than two months, a 9 hour multiple choice exam in two weeks to revise for on top of that, ranking 584 jobs, travelling up and down the country for interviews all whilst doing an 8-5 surgical attachment. I have no other option other than to force myself into it. My situation isn't unique, in fact most people who work a full time job face similar situations.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    I already know what's wrong. I'm a final year medical student with my qualifying exams in less than two months, a 9 hour multiple choice exam in two weeks to revise for on top of that, ranking 584 jobs, travelling up and down the country for interviews all whilst doing an 8-5 surgical attachment. I have no other option other than to force myself into it. My situation isn't unique, in fact most people who work a full time job face similar situations.
    Then no offence, but your situation is hardly necessarily the most relevant. In fact your lack of sympathy in telling someone who might have a serious sleep disorder essentially to get over it is shameful for a medic.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    someone who might have a serious sleep disorder
    Such as? This gentleman has clearly been seen by a doctor and has had investigations performed to rule out anything 'serious'. And no offence taken.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    Such as?
    What? Are you (the medic) asking me (the mathematician) to list sleep disorders? The obvious ones that come to mind are hypersomnia and narcolepsy. Point is, they exist, and you shouldn't be so dismissive of this person just because the reason for your tiredness is that you're busy and stressed.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    This gentleman has clearly been seen by a doctor and has had investigations performed to rule out anything 'serious'.
    GPs don't know anything about sleep disorders other than mild insomnia. I know this from experience. The OP has had blood tests, which rules out anaemia and rubbish diet. That's about it.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    What? Are you (the medic) asking me (the mathematician) to list sleep disorders? The obvious ones that come to mind are hypersomnia and narcolepsy. Point is, they exist, and you shouldn't be so dismissive of this person just because the reason for your tiredness is that you're busy and stressed.
    Why are you, the mathematician, coming up with medical diagnoses? :confused:

    Let's put things into perspective here.

    1.) This chap has been seen by a doctor. The most important fact, since this is in H&R and this is all unqualified advice. The doctor has taken no action. This therefore means something.

    2.) His bloods were normal.

    3.) He is young.

    4.) He is completely functionally normal. He goes out to the gym, lectures, shops etc. Hell, he does more than I do.

    5.) He sleeps 10 hours a day which is more than adequate, possibly excessive.

    6.) He has a normal appetite.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    . Point is, they exist, and you shouldn't be so dismissive of this person just because the reason for your tiredness is that you're busy and stressed.
    On the contrary, my post had nothing to do with my own tiredness.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    Such as? This gentleman has clearly been seen by a doctor and has had investigations performed to rule out anything 'serious'. And no offence taken.
    casue doctors have never failed to catch an illness before
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    GPs don't know anything about sleep disorders other than mild insomnia.
    wut
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    GPs don't know anything about sleep disorders other than mild insomnia. I know this from experience. The OP has had blood tests, which rules out anaemia and rubbish diet. That's about it.
    GPs know far more about sleep disorders than you do, that's for sure...anyone who thinks that blood tests just rule out anaemia and 'rubbish diet' (right...) with such confidence clearly doesn't know what they are talking about.
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    I find that if I allow myself to nap my body tends to expect that. Do you remember when it started? Because a lot of people find getting back to a normal routine after an illness (like a virus/the flu) when they've allowed themself to sleep whenever they want.
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    (Original post by LaBelleEtLeBete)
    I find that if I allow myself to nap my body tends to expect that. Do you remember when it started? Because a lot of people find getting back to a normal routine after an illness (like a virus/the flu) when they've allowed themself to sleep whenever they want.
    Sensible post!

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Updated: February 27, 2012
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