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Is it worth going to Sixth Form / College and university?

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Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
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    To answer simply, it all depends on what you'd like to do as a career, as well as any luck that may come your way.

    I don't really understand why uni has to be so expensive though. Isn't just a lot of independent learning of reading books and going to lectures on some subject, then doing coursework and taking exams? Why exactly are they so relevant to getting jobs?

    (Original post by Chambo)
    I'm sure I'm not the only one, but 6th form breaks my soul with the constant repetitiveness, mixed with absolute morons circulating around the college. The lessons are awful, and you're always thinking of what better things could be done. Yet, we all go to 6th form etc because there is bugger all else. Can't wait to leave.
    Yeah, I felt exactly the same as you! I only went to 6th form because it was the done thing, but man what a hellhole it was for me. I wish I knew about more options available when I was 16, so maybe I'd save myself the trouble I'm currently in.
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    (Original post by dean01234)
    What I said wasn't exclusive to degree's, I said you could go onto A-levels so that you are gaining something for your time instead of 10th prestige on cod and a bunch of failed interviews.
    And yet A-levels also aren't the be all and end all. You are obviously one of those of the mentality that it is school/sixth-form/uni or nothing.

    There are other options - work specific training, volunteering, training outside of the formal education system, learning a skill.

    You have to weigh it up and decide whether what you are spending 2 years, or even 5 years on is actually worth your time and whether it is better than nothing.

    (Original post by dean01234)
    Then maybe when the job market improves, GCSE's and A-levels will suffice and then experience will also be valuable, but at this current moment in time employers can afford to be picky. So it WILL be difficult no matter what industry you are looking at.
    The point is that regardless of the job market, unless you think about what you want to do - a degree might not be qualifying you for anything.

    Going to uni without thinking about it or because it is 'better than doing nothing' is just lame.

    Well over 40% of people (and this figure is rising) are going to university and are subsequently competing over a handful of jobs where a degree is an entry requirement or even just an advantage.

    When the job market is tough - it doesn't mean that having more A levels and degrees is going to get you that job stacking shelves/waiting on tables/unloading deliveries.
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    I was discussing this subject with my sixth form tutor the other day. He said that he would not recommend anyone to go to university now with the rise in tuition fees (he told me not to discuss his opinion with anyone else in the sixth form as he is obviously supposed to encourage and would probably get a *******ing from other teachers). Instead, he said that he would recommend doin an Open University degree which is well respected whilst trying to gain experience in that field via an apprenticeship.

    I have been thinking about this a lot as it gives you the best of both worlds as you are gaining experience and still getting a degree which employers want.
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    (Original post by lew-hand)
    I was discussing this subject with my sixth form tutor the other day. He said that he would not recommend anyone to go to university now with the rise in tuition fees (he told me not to discuss his opinion with anyone else in the sixth form as he is obviously supposed to encourage and would probably get a *******ing from other teachers). Instead, he said that he would recommend doin an Open University degree which is well respected whilst trying to gain experience in that field via an apprenticeship.
    Ha why am I not surprised? I do remember when I was at sixth form and I went to speak to the deputy head of sixth form and she told me, rather privately, that I don't have to go to university (I have chosen to go because this is what I want to do) and she told me that there are other options. I guess she wouldn't say it publicly otherwise she might get into a bit of trouble with the head of sixth form as we always drumming the idea of university into our heads like it was the best and only option.

    (Original post by lew-hand)
    I have been thinking about this a lot as it gives you the best of both worlds as you are gaining experience and still getting a degree which employers want.
    I have realised that more people are beginning to recommend this option. A friend of mine wants to do an apprenticeship in film production but she will also do a degree in Creative Writing.
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    (Original post by FelixFelicis)
    I study because I am passionate about my chosen subject. I also want to make a decent amount of money doing what I enjoy, and if that's what you call "being trained" then I suppose I am. And quite happy about it.
    Oh no, you're not trained at all. This is what I love the most, statements like this.

    If only more people took note.
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    (Original post by lew-hand)
    I was discussing this subject with my sixth form tutor the other day. He said that he would not recommend anyone to go to university now with the rise in tuition fees (he told me not to discuss his opinion with anyone else in the sixth form as he is obviously supposed to encourage and would probably get a *******ing from other teachers). Instead, he said that he would recommend doin an Open University degree which is well respected whilst trying to gain experience in that field via an apprenticeship.

    I have been thinking about this a lot as it gives you the best of both worlds as you are gaining experience and still getting a degree which employers want.
    Yeah, I also want to try the Open Uni. The only downside I'm seeing is that you don't get that same social experience you get with brick unis, and my social life is really lacking at the moment which is why I'm considering maybe going to uni in the near future. Also, for a good few months last year I really tried to get into an apprenticeship but got rejected from everything, so bear in mind that they're just as hard to get as normal jobs!
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    Yeah, I also want to try the Open Uni. The only downside I'm seeing is that you don't get that same social experience you get with brick unis, and my social life is really lacking at the moment which is why I'm considering maybe going to uni in the near future. Also, for a good few months last year I really tried to get into an apprenticeship but got rejected from everything, so bear in mind that they're just as hard to get as normal jobs!
    For people who want to go to university just for the social life:

    Why not just go along and try and join the societies or go to student pubs and clubs? Surely there is no point in going to the time and expense of a degree just for the hanging out when you can do all that for free in the evenings? You could also try to live with students. In a big university city, 90% of shared housing around the campus area will contain at least one student, so it should be easy to find.

    At a uni hiking club I used to go to, we had a couple of girls who came to the city as au pairs and were looking to meet other young people. Nobody cared that they weren't students.
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    (Original post by Spontogical)
    Oh no, you're not trained at all. This is what I love the most, statements like this.

    If only more people took note.
    It can be quite difficult to detect sarcasm on the internet. This would be one of those instances.
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    (Original post by FelixFelicis)
    It can be quite difficult to detect sarcasm on the internet. This would be one of those instances.
    Hehe. Sorry. But I'm mostly a straight-forward person.. though you're right it does sound a little sarcastic.
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    (Original post by Jake22)
    For people who want to go to university just for the social life:

    Why not just go along and try and join the societies or go to student pubs and clubs? Surely there is no point in going to the time and expense of a degree just for the hanging out when you can do all that for free in the evenings? You could also try to live with students. In a big university city, 90% of shared housing around the campus area will contain at least one student, so it should be easy to find.

    At a uni hiking club I used to go to, we had a couple of girls who came to the city as au pairs and were looking to meet other young people. Nobody cared that they weren't students.
    OK, I guess I could look into that. Although, it seems like to would be hard to get involved with that stuff if you're not a student? Does every uni let non-students into their societies and stuff?
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    Although, it seems like to would be hard to get involved with that stuff if you're not a student?
    Well, there is no problem going to student pubs and clubs and soforth.

    If you are just looking to meet like minded young people to have fun with - does it even matter if they happen to be students or not? The way most students make friends is via living together so you could just look into shared housing whether it is with students or not. House shares with more than two people are generally sub 30 year olds.

    I left school at 16 but I still enjoyed the student experience by housesharing, going to student pubs occaisionally and soforth. The only difference was I was working full time so I had a ton of money A friend from school was at the local uni when he turned 18, so I went round his halls every so often and went out with his student mates.

    I had more of a student lifestyle from 16-18 then I did when I actually went to uni when I was 21!

    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    Does every uni let non-students into their societies and stuff?
    Well, if you consulted the official policies and rules - probably not but I can't see most people having a problem with it. As I said, we had a few non-students in a society I went to and it was also common for alumni to come back and join in occaisionally or for people to bring friends.
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    (Original post by Jake22)
    Well, there is no problem going to student pubs and clubs and soforth.

    If you are just looking to meet like minded young people to have fun with - does it even matter if they happen to be students or not? The way most students make friends is via living together so you could just look into shared housing whether it is with students or not. House shares with more than two people are generally sub 30 year olds.

    I left school at 16 but I still enjoyed the student experience by housesharing, going to student pubs occaisionally and soforth. The only difference was I was working full time so I had a ton of money A friend from school was at the local uni when he turned 18, so I went round his halls every so often and went out with his student mates.

    I had more of a student lifestyle from 16-18 then I did when I actually went to uni when I was 21!

    Well, if you consulted the official policies and rules - probably not but I can't see most people having a problem with it. As I said, we had a few non-students in a society I went to and it was also common for alumni to come back and join in occaisionally or for people to bring friends.
    Thanks for your replies . Though, I don't work full time at the moment (it's very hard to get any paid work) so I don't think I can be randomly moving out just yet. But I'll look into it.

    If you go into student pubs alone is it easy to make friends with people in there?
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    My boyfriend left college half way through A levels and always had a passion for motor racing and is now a racing instructor at Everyman experience days!
    This is his second job, at 20 years old, and he is earning a standard rate at £100 per day to drive customers around a race track in a Ferrari! - not bad in my opinion
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    Yeah, I also want to try the Open Uni. The only downside I'm seeing is that you don't get that same social experience you get with brick unis, and my social life is really lacking at the moment which is why I'm considering maybe going to uni in the near future. Also, for a good few months last year I really tried to get into an apprenticeship but got rejected from everything, so bear in mind that they're just as hard to get as normal jobs!
    Hang in there and you will find one, I finally got one today after four months of interviews. It's sure is tough with about 100 applying for each decent apprenticeship.

    On the social aspect of things, why should you need to go get a degree in massive debt to have a social life. As somebody else said, go along and join the clubs and societies and plus you will have money so you can afford to go out and socialise as university isn't a passport to a great social life, it's what YOU make of it.
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    (Original post by lew-hand)
    Hang in there and you will find one, I finally got one today after four months of interviews. It's sure is tough with about 100 applying for each decent apprenticeship.

    On the social aspect of things, why should you need to go get a degree in massive debt to have a social life. As somebody else said, go along and join the clubs and societies and plus you will have money so you can afford to go out and socialise as university isn't a passport to a great social life, it's what YOU make of it.
    OK, thanks for the words of encouragement . One of the reasons I stopped applying for apprenticeships was because some feedback I was getting that apparently in interviews I wasn't showing enough passion for the roles. This has made me question myself and whether I really want to be going for these roles anymore, so I decided to give it a break. I'd also rather have a proper job so that I can hopefully earn more money than I would from most apprenticeships, and maybe go travelling later.

    Oh yeah, and there's also the fact that I'm struggling to get a job anyway in this bad economic climate, which is why I was wondering if it's worth going to uni full time instead so I have something more to do with my time whilst also getting a (possibly) sought after qualification?
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    (Original post by Niko Bellic)
    If you spend all your time studying for your subjects, this must have some form of negative psychological impact to your brain. From my experience and research so far, most subjects in sixth form and college are taught so that the person passes. Teachers don't care about expanding the students imagination, they in fact (mostly unintentionally) delude and train the students to become consumers and conformists working for around £25-40k a year. We aren't being taught, we are being trained. How many film directors or artists or millionaire entrepreneurs and businesses men do you know who went to college? Here are some examples of college/university dropout successes; Quentin Tarantino the director of Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction. Richard Branson, owner of the virgin company. Sir Alan Michael Sugar, owner of Amstrad, dropped out when he was 16! Bill Gates - Microsoft. Steve Jobs - Apple. These examples made me lead to the assumption that we are being trained in college and in university, and on top of that, we are paying to be trained! It's ridiculous! Is paying 27 thousand pounds for a three year course in University really worth it? I surely don't believe so... modern education methods corrupt the students imagination and potential to thrive and become a somebody.

    It is worth it if you want to carry on studying but it's your choice at the end...you can choose to work if you want to.
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    (Original post by CherryCherryBoomBoom)
    OK, thanks for the words of encouragement . One of the reasons I stopped applying for apprenticeships was because some feedback I was getting that apparently in interviews I wasn't showing enough passion for the roles. This has made me question myself and whether I really want to be going for these roles anymore, so I decided to give it a break. I'd also rather have a proper job so that I can hopefully earn more money than I would from most apprenticeships, and maybe go travelling later.

    Oh yeah, and there's also the fact that I'm struggling to get a job anyway in this bad economic climate, which is why I was wondering if it's worth going to uni full time instead so I have something more to do with my time whilst also getting a (possibly) sought after qualification?
    What roles have you been applying for? Do you research on the company and the subject to use as ammunition for enthusiasm. The economy may be bad now and it could be even worse if you went to uni and still struggle. Statistically there is about in average of 80 applicants for every graduate job and the figures where high even before the recession.
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    (Original post by lew-hand)
    What roles have you been applying for? Do you research on the company and the subject to use as ammunition for enthusiasm. The economy may be bad now and it could be even worse if you went to uni and still struggle. Statistically there is about in average of 80 applicants for every graduate job and the figures where high even before the recession.
    I've been trying for digital and creative media type roles. They did sound interesting to me, and I tried for them, but no luck. And I definitely always have done research on the companies in good time prior to interview, even so much as printing off relevant info for me to revise in the train on the way to the interview.

    Ah right, I guess not going to uni and going to uni both equally have so many their pros and cons, leaving me in a bit of a dilemma. Though, I heard the job market is supposed to improve in 2014? Although, I guess anything could happen between now and then...
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    (Original post by Niko Bellic)
    If you spend all your time studying for your subjects, this must have some form of negative psychological impact to your brain. From my experience and research so far, most subjects in sixth form and college are taught so that the person passes. Teachers don't care about expanding the students imagination, they in fact (mostly unintentionally) delude and train the students to become consumers and conformists working for around £25-40k a year. We aren't being taught, we are being trained. How many film directors or artists or millionaire entrepreneurs and businesses men do you know who went to college? Here are some examples of college/university dropout successes; Quentin Tarantino the director of Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction. Richard Branson, owner of the virgin company. Sir Alan Michael Sugar, owner of Amstrad, dropped out when he was 16! Bill Gates - Microsoft. Steve Jobs - Apple. These examples made me lead to the assumption that we are being trained in college and in university, and on top of that, we are paying to be trained! It's ridiculous! Is paying 27 thousand pounds for a three year course in University really worth it? I surely don't believe so... modern education methods corrupt the students imagination and potential to thrive and become a somebody.
    So you've given examples of some of the wealthiest/ most successful business owners.

    What about the thousands, if not tens of thousands of businessmen and millions of people who HAVE made a lot of money after following the regular education system? Your examples are worth very little and are probably coincidental. Back in those days, less people actually attended university, as they were more 'elitist' institutions. You generally had to come from well-off families. The world is changing, we are no longer in the global trading boom ( as much ) or in the Industrial revolution. Jobs and Gates made their money because they were first in the door. Both of them actually ripped off the real people who invented their products.

    With people in the East having better education that they have ever had, there is subsequently more competition for jobs around the world. Without a degree, who would want to employ you in a job that was actually worth anything?

    You are saying teachers don't care about expanding the students imagination. If you go to a good college/university - you can almost be garunteed that there will be a more than a strictly 'results based' relationship between both the student and teacher. On top of this, you are also implying that working for 25k-40k per year is a bad thing. It's not. It depends on your perspective of life. What if you do your job for no other reason that wanting to help people? To feel valued? To be part of the community?

    By modern education, what are you referring to? IB actually has very open questions, which are there to help enhance the student's critical thinking skills as well as further challenge their knowledge of the subject.

    No, formal education is not for everybody. Yes, some people will get breaks, and still go on to be successful. However, if you were to speak to of people who are in their 60's, have worked hard for nothing all their life, and chose not to go to university, and ask them.. ' Do you regret not trying harder in school, going to university, and appreciating the education you received', I'm confident that they'd say yes.

    You are clearly a narrow minded person, open your eyes and see the real world. Part of the reason wages 'bad' as you described ( Which they are definitely not, the average wage in the UK is one of the highest in the world ), is because of the current global crisis that is going on right now. As well as The Iron Lady, my god did that woman ruin Britain.
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    (Original post by Jake22)
    I'm sorry to break it to you but you are talking out of your hole or rather just parroting back what has been force fed to you by overbearing parents and school teachers.

    Me and many of my friends finished school at 16 and many of us are doing well for themselves now. For example:

    - D is a self employed gas fitter and makes over £35k
    - N worked for estate agencies for a few years before setting up his own lettings agency with a friend. He also owns several of his own properties that he lets out.
    - C worked started working in tech support and is now a network admin making around £30k
    - M is in the police
    - S is in the Royal Military Police
    - Before I went back in to full time education, I was an insurance underwriter working for a major financial institution. When I finally decided to go to university, I turned down an overseas job offer that would have netted me £40k in my first year at 21 years old.

    and the oldest of us is 28 so it isn't as if we are going back very far into history.
    If you don't mind me asking what did you do after school coz I got kicked out sixth form and I don't know what to do next?

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