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IMPERIAL -High prestige but low student stisfaction level ???

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    (Original post by catestevenson)
    That's expensive?
    I live up North (five-ten minute drive from Liverpool city centre) and have to pay £60/month for a travel pass that only covers one area, and £50 is a pretty conservative night out up here unless there's A LOT of pre-drinking involved.
    I have never been to Liverpool, so can't say.

    Manchester, Edinburgh, glasgow, York and aberdeen were all cheaper then London when I visited.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    I have never been to Liverpool, so can't say.

    Manchester, Edinburgh, glasgow, York and aberdeen were all cheaper then London when I visited.
    For rent and that, it is loads cheaper (almost half the price really) but not public transport. The advantage of a lot of civic universities like Manchester or Liverpool is that you can often just walk everywhere and don't need to regularly use public transport.
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    (Original post by catestevenson)
    The advantage of a lot of civic universities like Manchester or Liverpool is that you can often just walk everywhere and don't need to regularly use public transport.
    Problem solved then.

    And if rent is cheaper, it means that you have more money left over for leisure.

    A pint of beer is definitely cheaper up north. London prices 3 quid, up north, it is about 1-2 pounds for a pint.
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    Imperial can't take all the blame for my failings though, I was too young, immature and clueless going in. I wasn't prepared and that's largely thanks to the poor advice from my bog-awful comprehensive and lack of enthusiasm shown by my parents (and their lack of knowledge). If I could go back, I'd do things differently and I'm sure I'd get a 2.1 or above. But then that's the whole point of the system; not screwing up at any stage and sailing through it. I was also far too fixated on worrying about how smart/dumb I was rather than just seeing education for what it is; hard work and hoop jumping, not an IQ test.
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    (Original post by Physics Enemy)
    Imperial can't take all the blame for my failings though, I was too young, immature and clueless going in. I wasn't prepared and that's largely thanks to the poor advice from my bog-awful comprehensive and lack of enthusiasm shown by my parents (and their lack of knowledge). If I could go back, I'd do things differently and I'm sure I'd get a 2.1 or above. But then that's the whole point of the system; not screwing up at any stage and sailing through it. I was also far too fixated on worrying about how smart/dumb I was rather than just seeing education for what it is; hard work and hoop jumping, not an IQ test.
    To be honest IC should have given you adequate support. By the sounds of it, you never had it - the general vibe I am getting from here, it's all a bit cut throat at that university.

    I lost my best friend to suicide during my time at university, and honestly, if it wasn't for the support I got from my department, I would have ended up with a 2.2/3rd. At one point I was on the brink of dropping out. They really cared about their students.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    To be honest IC should have given you adequate support. By the sounds of it, you never had it - the general vibe I am getting from here, it's all a bit cut throat at that university.

    I lost my best friend to suicide during my time at university, and honestly, if it wasn't for the support I got from my department, I would have ended up with a 2.2/3rd. At one point I was on the brink of dropping out. They really cared about their students.
    I agree with this, though I wish I was clued up enough on that front when entering; that way I'd be wary of their attitude and just do things my way. Even regarding the actual learning, I didn't do enough self-teaching from books even when lecturers sometimes sucked; it's that kind of naivity that's costly. Another problem, again getting to the root of things; people like me and many students, really don't know what we want to do with our lives, so university was the automatic choice. We all know what a dumb idea that actually is.
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    (Original post by Physics Enemy)
    I agree with this, though I wish I was clued up enough on that front when entering; that way I'd be wary of their attitude and just do things my way. Even regarding the actual learning, I didn't do enough self-teaching from books even when lecturers sometimes sucked; it's that kind of naivity that's costly. Another problem, again getting to the root of things; people like me and many students, really don't know what we want to do with our lives, so university was the automatic choice. We all know what a dumb idea that actually is.
    Yeah, depression does that, so I honestly wouldn't be hard on yourself.

    When I was going through hard times at uni, I remember feeling that way. Ironically, after my second year (4 year degree in Scotland) I really had no idea where I was going with my degree. So, I took a year out, worked in London within industry, got a fresh perspective in life. The university bubble does that, because employment is different to academia.

    As I am sure you have also found; the problem lies with motivating yourself to study, as opposed to actually studying. Which when it comes down to it, from my experience, it was all exam techniques and working in groups. Sharing knowledge with one another. I think you labelled this as rote learning earlier. A 2.1 student doesn't as you rightly put have to be a genius, he just needs to know how to grasp concepts and work hard. The difference in intelligence is the time taken to grasp concepts, with one guy it may take slightly longer then the other, but as long as they grasp the concepts, who cares?

    This is why university is not a good indicator of intelligence, because there are so many other variables in play which can cause a fail to under-perform. If you take into account personal issues that may happen, you cannot base someones business acumen on how consistent they were. Due to it not being an even playing field from the outset.

    Physics Enemy, you sound like a really smart guy, that is clued up about ****. I would employ you, because you have good interpersonal skills, which is probably much more important then the degree mark. Given, you are working in a team in most organisations. Many 1st class students I knew, were socially inept as hell.
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    Imperial may be prestigious in the UK, but in north american and in some parts of asia, its unheard of
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    It might be because students will have very high expectations- and if it falls slightly short of these, then they might rate it very poorly.
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    (Original post by Ruvermillion)
    Imperial may be prestigious in the UK, but in north american and in some parts of asia, its unheard of
    A lot of people in the UK have not heard of it either.

    Personally I love Imperial and I have many friends here who are also very happy and enjoying their courses.
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    (Original post by Zottula)
    A lot of people in the UK have not heard of it either.

    Personally I love Imperial and I have many friends here who are also very happy and enjoying their courses.
    Exactly
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    (Original post by Zottula)
    A lot of people in the UK have not heard of it either.

    Personally I love Imperial and I have many friends here who are also very happy and enjoying their courses.
    That's good to hear.

    I've been hearing too much negative stuff about enjoying life at Imperial...
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    (Original post by Alpha-Omega)
    That's good to hear.

    I've been hearing too much negative stuff about enjoying life at Imperial...
    :dontknow: I'm genuinely very happy here. I wouldn't be happy if all of the people around me were miserable. I admit I'm not a party animal, but I spend plenty of time hanging around with my friends, having a laugh with people in the kitchen, sometimes exploring London etc. My department is very good and I think the lecturers and the way the course is run great. I have friends in other departments who are also satisfied with their courses.

    I can't argue against people who say they hated their time here as that was their experience. But plenty of people go to Imperial enjoy themselves. It helps if you are actually interested in your subject though as you will have to work hard.
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    (Original post by Ruvermillion)
    Imperial may be prestigious in the UK, but in north american and in some parts of asia, its unheard of
    That's meaningless unless you're looking to work abroad.
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    (Original post by Zottula)
    A lot of people in the UK have not heard of it either.
    Forget the people, It's about how employers view the Uni. The same misconception occurs with Warwick etc.
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    (Original post by f1mad)
    Forget the people, It's about how employers view the Uni. The same misconception occurs with Warwick etc.
    Yes this is true. Which is why I really don't care when many people I know haven't heard of it.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Yeah, depression does that, so I honestly wouldn't be hard on yourself.

    When I was going through hard times at uni, I remember feeling that way. Ironically, after my second year (4 year degree in Scotland) I really had no idea where I was going with my degree. So, I took a year out, worked in London within industry, got a fresh perspective in life. The university bubble does that, because employment is different to academia.

    As I am sure you have also found; the problem lies with motivating yourself to study, as opposed to actually studying. Which when it comes down to it, from my experience, it was all exam techniques and working in groups. Sharing knowledge with one another. I think you labelled this as rote learning earlier. A 2.1 student doesn't as you rightly put have to be a genius, he just needs to know how to grasp concepts and work hard. The difference in intelligence is the time taken to grasp concepts, with one guy it may take slightly longer then the other, but as long as they grasp the concepts, who cares?

    This is why university is not a good indicator of intelligence, because there are so many other variables in play which can cause a fail to under-perform. If you take into account personal issues that may happen, you cannot base someones business acumen on how consistent they were. Due to it not being an even playing field from the outset.

    Physics Enemy, you sound like a really smart guy, that is clued up about ****. I would employ you, because you have good interpersonal skills, which is probably much more important then the degree mark. Given, you are working in a team in most organisations. Many 1st class students I knew, were socially inept as hell.
    Most of this is spot on. However, degrees and academia aren't meant to try and test intelligence; it's about hard work and quality of education. Most people know it's not an IQ test; I believe it has rarely been seen that way. Occasionally, yes, the correlation gets misinterpreted or overplayed.

    Thanks for the temporary ego boost, however it does flatter me. I'm really not all that bright and I do point the finger at myself, however tempting it is to pin everything on ICL/parents/schooling (or lack of!). The damage is done now. I say that, because it's not like I can resit a year of uni nor even do a degree from scratch (eek!). The system is designed that way; a swift, deadly cull.
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    (Original post by Physics Enemy)
    Most of this is spot on. However, degrees and academia aren't meant to try and test intelligence; it's about hard work and quality of education. Most people know it's not an IQ test; I believe it has rarely been seen that way. Occasionally, yes, the correlation gets misinterpreted or overplayed.

    Thanks for the temporary ego boost, however it does flatter me. I'm really not all that bright and I do point the finger at myself, however tempting it is to pin everything on ICL/parents/schooling (or lack of!). The damage is done now. I say that, because it's not like I can resit a year of uni nor even do a degree from scratch (eek!). The system is designed that way; a swift, deadly cull.
    I didn't study at ICL, so you are smarter then me, in a traditional academic sense.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    I didn't study at ICL, so you are smarter then me, in a traditional academic sense.
    I don't think that's true by any means, you might have not tried as hard during GCSEs and A-Levels, you might have been busy with being a normal teenager for all I know. Your schooling might have been rubbish. In addition, you've proven yourself at degree level (where it counts); I haven't.

    And irregardless of that, 'smarter in a traditional academic sense' is so vaguely defined and such a narrow form of 'brightness', it's hardly worth considering on those terms. I'm not even the same person as x years ago, so my past grades are irrelevant. Maybe I'd fail GCSE's for all I know.

    Ultimately, the forrest gump quote rings ever true; stupid is, as stupid does. If I couldn't see things for what they were, earlier on in the game, that's my stupidity.
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    (Original post by Physics Enemy)
    I don't think that's true by any means, you might have not tried as hard during GCSEs and A-Levels, you might have been busy with being a normal teenager for all I know. Your schooling might have been rubbish. In addition, you've proven yourself at degree level (where it counts); I haven't.

    And irregardless of that, 'smarter in a traditional academic sense' is so vaguely defined and such a narrow form of 'brightness', it's hardly worth considering on those terms. I'm not even the same person as x years ago, so my past grades are irrelevant. Maybe I'd fail GCSE's for all I know.

    Ultimately, the forrest gump quote rings ever true; stupid is, as stupid does. If I couldn't see things for what they were, earlier on in the game, that's my stupidity.
    Chin up mate.

    The game is not over for you. Leave the 2.2 off your CV when applying for jobs, that way you dont attract attention to it.

    Having Imperial/Physics alone, would probably give your CV a second look, in my case, I couldn't do that, so I had to get the mark. On top of that a 2.2 would have screwed me over with any postgrad plans, if I ever decide to go down that road.

    If applying to grad schemes, if you haven't already, phone HR up if you fall short of their entry requirements. Work for free if you have to for an internship. I have a friend doing this, that hasn't got a degree.

    Another method: apply to smaller companies, gain experience. Then target a big corp.

    I'm currently working for a start up, developing a software product - recently we got the likes of HP/Microsoft to partner with us, after seeing the idea.

    Game ain't over yet, still a long way to go

    The nature of this beast means, when the odds are stacked against you, you just have play with the game more creatively, rather then go down the traditional route which the top uni 2.1 grad will. Whilst being decisive at it.

    I will tell you an interesting story, that will inspire you:

    A guy on my CS course came upto me after I submitted an assignment in. I told him that I was worried...he then goes "fat_hobbit, don't worry if you ****ed up the assignment, you will get a 2.2 like me"

    Come graduation day....he got the 2.2, I got the 2.1.

    Similarly come exam time, I would study like a horse, whilst my peers would get all demoralised and tired. And then go to bed.

    Always fight till the end. Employers will probably be more impressed by a truly hungry graduate then a 2.1 imperial graduate who thinks that it is his god given right to get into their company because he went to Imperial. The 2.2 if anything has taught you humility; use it as a strength. You have experienced 'failure' by your standard now, which is a good thing, because you will soon develop the skills to recover from it. Consistent graduates on the other hand probably don't know the meaning of failure. So, when they do fail, which they will at some point, anything goes...
Updated: April 2, 2012
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