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you are not dyslexic!

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    (Original post by see-are)
    I recently heard that at one of the top independent schools in the UK they get almost every pupil tested for dyslexia or other that may gain him/her extra time in exams. I heard that out of my friends year (approx 150) about forty get extra time - this is a school which has a formidable entrance exam and gets top results. I go to my local comp and in my year of 220 there are about 20 boys with extra time..

    I simply do not believe that so many people at this high achieving school have these disorders.

    It is a trend that I have noticed when discussing this story with other people - it now seems that more and more people are being deemed as dyslexic or dyspraxic or adhd etc etc

    So, do you think they are faking it? Or the tests are too lenient? Or there just are more dyslexic people nowadays? How can you explain my story - it makes me so angry!

    yes they do my brother's girlfrind went to top private school with lots of um how u say, inernationl student from china.. and girlfriend tell him girls there lie and fake dyslexia in pretnece to get extra english support to get extra time but my brother have actual disability you know (not dyslexia but something else) and tell me cant beleive people do this because he never get xtra time but hvae to deal with real problem but what to do is real worrld jaja


    (Original post by MrHappy_J)
    oh boo hoo, youre just worried about the competition in getting to oxford.

    reasons for getting extra time other than dyslexia, hm let me see...there's hand and arm injuries, mental illness, and basically anything else that can impact on your writing speed if you can prove it with a doctor's certificate. oh and personal circumstances like bereavement also count.

    this is such a non-issue i dont even know why you felt compelled to create a thread about it.

    this i dont know about am from venezuela. that brother of mine is um divorced.. i mean i live with other family he live with other in england butfor him very hard because family not accept 'disabled' label is very um.. bad.. so feel very shame at first he tell me cant speak to family so its sad im lucky because well for now i work in a shop so far and learn anything on my own.. high school did not do very well jaja but somehow i will climb up.. i dont know what brother disability is but he did gcse in england and i remember him tell me using pen was very hard he has some disorder dont know wht was very attached with eraser.. i know sound weird


    is true phenomenon of dyslexic overdiagnosed? this i never heard.. but will read. I thank my brother because as I say I did not do very well in high school here and when I hear him share his story a few years after i graduate i begin think like 'hmm how did i study' so i write on my own my pattern and then i break down to see if i can fix it... maybe in england they just test and use marks from test to decide diagnoses?
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    That's discrimination and therefore, illegal.
    Discrimination is illegal but it is a fact of life that certain disabilities mean you cannot perform certain jobs. I use a wheelchair and would not expect to be hired as a shelf stacker in a supermarket, it's simply not a job I could do effectively. I would, however, expect to have an equal chance of getting a job working on the checkout in a supermarket.

    If you fall asleep in the middle of doing a task, or when required to concentrate on something for a few hours there are going to be jobs you simply cannot do (for example, should you be working as an air traffic controller?) The employer needs to know about your condition to ensure that you are going to be able to safely and effectively do the job in question. Discrimination applies if an employer chooses a less qualified candidate over you for a job you would be able to perform. It doesn't apply if you are simply not able to do the job in question.
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    (Original post by JustRollingAlong)
    Discrimination is illegal but it is a fact of life that certain disabilities mean you cannot perform certain jobs. I use a wheelchair and would not expect to be hired as a shelf stacker in a supermarket, it's simply not a job I could do effectively. I would, however, expect to have an equal chance of getting a job working on the checkout in a supermarket.

    If you fall asleep in the middle of doing a task, or when required to concentrate on something for a few hours there are going to be jobs you simply cannot do (for example, should you be working as an air traffic controller?) The employer needs to know about your condition to ensure that you are going to be able to safely and effectively do the job in question. Discrimination applies if an employer chooses a less qualified candidate over you for a job you would be able to perform. It doesn't apply if you are simply not able to do the job in question.
    It's not that simple with me and falling asleep. I know why I fall asleep and know what to do next time before it happens.

    You have missed the point - there's a big difference between not hiring someone because their disability means they can't do a job and not hiring someone because you (employer) think they can't do the job - yet, there's no evidence for this. I am lucky that my assistant manager is partially sighted; so does understand more than the manager about my difficulties.
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    Dyslexia tests don't just test your spelling ability. They test stuff like spacial aware with shape problems etc. I could probably fake a test because my boyfriend is dyslexic, so all I'd have to do is ask him what areas he did badly in and fail those on purpose. It is possible to fake but not as simple as not spelling something right.
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    (Original post by the_spirit_room)



    this i dont know about am from venezuela. that brother of mine is um divorced.. i mean i live with other family he live with other in england butfor him very hard because family not accept 'disabled' label is very um.. bad.. so feel very shame at first he tell me cant speak to family so its sad im lucky because well for now i work in a shop so far and learn anything on my own.. high school did not do very well jaja but somehow i will climb up.. i dont know what brother disability is but he did gcse in england and i remember him tell me using pen was very hard he has some disorder dont know wht was very attached with eraser.. i know sound weird


    is true phenomenon of dyslexic overdiagnosed? this i never heard.. but will read. I thank my brother because as I say I did not do very well in high school here and when I hear him share his story a few years after i graduate i begin think like 'hmm how did i study' so i write on my own my pattern and then i break down to see if i can fix it... maybe in england they just test and use marks from test to decide diagnoses?
    this whole paragraph is incomprehensible, sorry.
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    (Original post by Zangoose)
    It's so easy to pretend to have dyslexia just to have an extra 20 minutes in an exam. Dyslexia is possibly the greatest student hoax known to man.
    There are far easier things to pretend to have. I got the option of extra time or extra marks because I have Tinnitus.
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    (Original post by MrHappy_J)
    this whole paragraph is incomprehensible, sorry.
    which part do you want to understand? english is my fourth language. would you like me to rewrite it?

    --

    Ok jaja here I go..

    I mean to say this:

    My brother whom I was talking about who did GCSE in England it was hard for him because of shame associated with it being called 'disability'. It is stigma and family did not understand how challenges in learning get to be called 'disability'. So for him not only struggle at certain parts of learning but also at relaying to family and then to accept himself..the way he is.

    For me, brother and me got split up when we were young (therefore I remain in Venezuela until now), I did not do very well in high school.. I suspect some kind of learning challenges.. his story inspire me in that I learn to accept myself. In venezuela where I live this things are unheard of @ disability and support. So what I do is I don't care about all kinds of labels.. I do a kind of 'log' where I analyse my study habits.. for example feelings, challenges, patterns that thing.. So I break down and tackle all by myself. Hopefully I will have progress in this before I start my distance learning and then after I hope I will come to england someday to study degree in situ. What I have been doing after high school is work in a shop and read my own interest in many subjects. As for my brother I cannot remember what his learning disability is called, but I remember him telling me before his GCSE he had this difficulty whereby he could not use pen up til mock exam.. he was very attached with eraser. So he seek counselling on his own during which teacher observe his writing pattern and he had to be eased from using pencil eraser, to using erasable pen to using normal pen. This is just one facet of his learning challenge and this was in the past.

    Is dyslexia really over-diagnosed in the uk? I didn't know this except for that instance in my brother's girlfriends' school. As I mentioned, the east asian international students would fake dyslexia (and tell each other to do so, eg how u say in england.. 'muck up?' results on purpose) to get concession like extra time.

    Anyway, in that unintelligible post of mine I mentioned:

    I thank my brother because as I say I did not do very well in high school here and when I hear him share his story a few years after i graduate i begin think like 'hmm how did i study' so i write on my own my pattern and then i break down to see if i can fix it... maybe in england they just test and use marks from test to decide diagnoses?

    Maybe that can also be alternative explanation of why many people test as 'dyslexia' (i don't mean fake ones like classmates of my brother's girlfriend). Because as someone say here "psychologists are only human" so every testing tool has its limits.. in some ways official learning diagnosis (theory) like everything, can have flaws too. For now people can only fit in finite categories like 'dyslexia, dyspraxia, add' and some others I can't remember. So these are the only choices.

    I was just offering an additional analysis that might be relevant to the thread...(and also tell an unintelligible story jaja)
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    It's not that simple with me and falling asleep. I know why I fall asleep and know what to do next time before it happens.

    You have missed the point - there's a big difference between not hiring someone because their disability means they can't do a job and not hiring someone because you (employer) think they can't do the job - yet, there's no evidence for this. I am lucky that my assistant manager is partially sighted; so does understand more than the manager about my difficulties.
    There is some evidence that you would not be able to do some jobs, though. That evidence being that you can't get through a couple of hours of work without breaks. There are some jobs where you would not be able to take an extra break because you are at risk of falling asleep due to your disability. An A&E doctor for example can't take a break when treating a critically injured person, a bus driver can't take a break in the middle of their route.

    I think you misunderstood my point. I wasn't saying you shouldn't have whatever job it is you currently have. I was saying that there are some jobs that you wouldn't be able to do as well as other qualified candidate. Not that the employer would [I]think[I] you can't do as well, but that you actually could not do as well. For those jobs it would not be discrimination for the employer to choose to hire someone else instead.
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    (Original post by xDave-)
    There are far easier things to pretend to have. I got the option of extra time or extra marks because I have Tinnitus.
    Is this your sly way of telling me you pretended to have tinnitus for extra time? 'Cuz you can't actually prove that you have it can you? It's just a claim with a forged Doctor's note attached.

    Well played, mate.
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    I think it is the way the system works that is slightly odd - my sister is not incredibly intelligent and she is very poor at spelling, and a couple of years ago was diagnosed with 'spelling dislexia,' which gives her extra time. Even she and my parents think that she simply isn't very good at spelling - not that she has any kind of disorder or learning disability. She is however incredibly talented at art and has no real desire for extra time because academia is not involved in the careers she wants to pursue, and we all feel that the school simply identified her as someone who would probably get lower marks in her humanity and language GCSEs and so just shipped her off to the educational psychologist almost as a precautionary measure in case my parents tried to blame her teachers/her syllabus.

    Essentially all I'm trying to say is that in my experience at least, many people seem to be diagnosed with a learning disability simply because they aren't academic, but are arty or sporty or anything else instead. Obvs I know a lot of dyslexics who are genii, or near enough it seems lol, and this is in no way even a general rule, but people tend to notice the questionable diagnosis's rather than the reliable ones, which is probably why so many people have the view that the test is not specific enough or being faked.
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    (Original post by Joker370)
    I think it is the way the system works that is slightly odd - my sister is not incredibly intelligent and she is very poor at spelling, and a couple of years ago was diagnosed with 'spelling dislexia,' which gives her extra time. Even she and my parents think that she simply isn't very good at spelling - not that she has any kind of disorder or learning disability. She is however incredibly talented at art and has no real desire for extra time because academia is not involved in the careers she wants to pursue, and we all feel that the school simply identified her as someone who would probably get lower marks in her humanity and language GCSEs and so just shipped her off to the educational psychologist almost as a precautionary measure in case my parents tried to blame her teachers/her syllabus.
    Did your sister go to boarding school?

    Is this a common phenomenon that british parents blame teachers?

    Did your sister stick with art because she had talent in it?

    Did she have no interest in other subjects because it would be more challenging than something she has talent for or because she really did not have interest in anything but art?
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    (Original post by MrHappy_J)
    oh boo hoo, youre just worried about the competition in getting to oxford.

    reasons for getting extra time other than dyslexia, hm let me see...there's hand and arm injuries, mental illness, and basically anything else that can impact on your writing speed if you can prove it with a doctor's certificate. oh and personal circumstances like bereavement also count.

    this is such a non-issue i dont even know why you felt compelled to create a thread about it.
    these are people who have been given extra time specifically for dyslexia (some of whom i am suggesting don't really have it), stay on topic.
    im not going to even apply to oxford so ...?
    it obviously is an issue if people are wrongly getting extra time, you are probably one of these people, the only kind of person who this wouldn't effect negatively.
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    (Original post by see-are)
    these are people who have been given extra time specifically for dyslexia (some of whom i am suggesting don't really have it), stay on topic.
    im not going to even apply to oxford so ...?
    it obviously is an issue if people are wrongly getting extra time, you are probably one of these people, the only kind of person who this wouldn't effect negatively.
    ok you're the one who asked me who else could get extra time so don't tell me to stay on topic.

    it says in your profile "oxbridge hopeful" :rolleyes:

    I'm not "wrongly" getting extra time, you dont know anything about me so who are you to say that? do you want me to scan my report to prove it to you??

    it doesn't affect you so what are you worried about?

    get off your high horse. honestly, you're just as bad as the people who think that everyone who's on benefits is a "scrounger".
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    (Original post by MrHappy_J)
    ok you're the one who asked me who else could get extra time so don't tell me to stay on topic.

    it says in your profile "oxbridge hopeful" :rolleyes:

    I'm not "wrongly" getting extra time, you dont know anything about me so who are you to say that? do you want me to scan my report to prove it to you??

    it doesn't affect you so what are you worried about?

    get off your high horse. honestly, you're just as bad as the people who think that everyone who's on benefits is a "scrounger".
    errrrr you stalked my profile errrrr yeah thats oxbridge not oxford

    it doesn't affect me but it is still an injustice.

    not everyone on benefits is a scrounger, only the minority that fake ailments etc just like not everyone on extra time has an unfair advantage, only the ones wrongly diagnosed or faking it - very poor analogy by you : S
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    I have sex daily.

    Oh wait, I mean dyslexia...
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    I AM dyslexic, My original test took around 1 month and i have regular shorter check-ups every 3 years. you can't fake being dyslexic, some of the test are so complicated, your not even sure what the right or wrong answers are. In some tests the better you do the more likley you are to be dyslexic. There are loads of different tests, done in different ways.
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    I ended up crying in one of my test sessions. It was the one where you've given an assortment of shapes, shown a picture of a larger shape and then you have to try to make that shape with the smaller shapes you've got.

    I could not do it. Even the very first one where the picture had lines on it showing which shapes fitted together to make the larger one.

    My non-verbal IQ (of which the above test was one assessor of) is in the 47th percentile. In comparison, my verbal IQ is in the 97th percentile.

    I'm diagnosed as having dyslexia and dyspraxia.

    People who fake it, if indeed there are people who fake it, annoy me. They annoy me a lot. Oh and I wasn't entered in for the tests by teachers wanting to cover their backs. I was fed up with struggling with certain things that my classmates could do easily, asked if I could get any help and was told to go to the learning support department. And it went from there.


    EDIT: Just to clarify. I cried when the test was over because I was so frustrated with myself for not being able to do it. I just couldn't see it.
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    I went to a top private school where a lot of my friends deliberately took and failed the dyslexia test in order to gain extra time in the exams.
    It really irritated me, especially when they used to joke about it and are now reading humanities at Oxbridge.
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    I feel sorry for those people before the dyslexia tests who didn't know they had it because it wasn't even invented then! Those people who would fall behind of classes and just be forgotten about whilst the able students would race ahead..suppose now a days we're 'lucky' to have this test done...but in all honestly a lot of my friends, (where I probably could do with the extra time than they do) can use their 'dyslexia' as an excuse!
    Grinds my gears at times when I pressed for times in exams whilst they're sitting back relaxed!

    But I think a test like this is (obviously) needed to help those who need it, and I do feel sorry for them.
    But for those just taking the test just for the sake of it and cheating the system is a stoop too low...
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    (Original post by Hravan)
    I ended up crying in one of my test sessions. It was the one where you've given an assortment of shapes, shown a picture of a larger shape and then you have to try to make that shape with the smaller shapes you've got.

    I could not do it. Even the very first one where the picture had lines on it showing which shapes fitted together to make the larger one.

    My non-verbal IQ (of which the above test was one assessor of) is in the 47th percentile. In comparison, my verbal IQ is in the 97th percentile.

    I'm diagnosed as having dyslexia and dyspraxia.

    People who fake it, if indeed there are people who fake it, annoy me. They annoy me a lot. Oh and I wasn't entered in for the tests by teachers wanting to cover their backs. I was fed up with struggling with certain things that my classmates could do easily, asked if I could get any help and was told to go to the learning support department. And it went from there.


    EDIT: Just to clarify. I cried when the test was over because I was so frustrated with myself for not being able to do it. I just couldn't see it.
    I have dyspraxia as well, I have trouble with all kinds of things because of it, made school really difficult and people bullied me a lot cause of the things I had trouble with

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