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Realistic Route to becoming an Investment Banker?

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    (Original post by JBateman)
    Thanks for that, the fact that it is possible to study at top universities without maths is highly reassuring to me. Sorry the prying questions, but what were your subjects and grades/predicted grades?
    No probs - Predicted grades AAB in Economics, Geography and Histroy
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    Ever thought about P.P.E (politics, philosophy and economics)?

    I admit it would be beneficial if you had A-Level Maths, but it is by no means unheard of for people to get onto this course at universities like Oxford without having done it. You would, however, need to demonstrate your aptitude for the economics/maths side of the course in other ways. It just seems like the course would suit you, as it does not narrow your options for the future in the same way that specifically finance related courses can- like those previously discussed - but has a very, very good reputation in the Banking world, as in other sectors. It would allow you to use your A-levels in History and English Literature to your advantage, as these are very highly regarded for PPE, whereas you would be pushed to find excuses for them (and business studies) if you apply for more maths heavy courses. It also leaves you very free to change your mind if it turns out later down the road that Investment Banking isn't for you - PPE will put you in good stead for almost any profession you can think of (Law, Teaching, Politics, Academia, Journalism; the list goes on).

    Just thought it may be something to consider. But before you write off PPE at Oxford because you think you have not got a chance of getting in (as so many people do) - this is not necessarily the case as the standard offer will almost certainly be AAA, possibly A*AA by the time you apply, which is in line with the other courses you mentioned. All I would say is don't just ignore the highly prestigious universities and courses because they seem unreachable (not that I'm saying you are necessarily doing this), just try to speak to people that have actually been successful at getting into these places (TSR is a great place to find them!) and ask them what they think... you'll be surprised at the number of people that get onto courses that they never dreamed they would qualify for, let alone make a successful application.
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    Ever thought about P.P.E (politics, philosophy and economics)?

    I admit it would be beneficial if you had A-Level Maths, but it is by no means unheard of for people to get onto this course at universities like Oxford without having done it. You would, however, need to demonstrate your aptitude for the economics/maths side of the course in other ways. It just seems like the course would suit you, as it does not narrow your options for the future in the same way that specifically finance related courses can- like those previously discussed - but has a very, very good reputation in the Banking world, as in other sectors. It would allow you to use your A-levels in History and English Literature to your advantage, as these are very highly regarded for PPE, whereas you would be pushed to find excuses for them (and business studies) if you apply for more maths heavy courses. It also leaves you very free to change your mind if it turns out later down the road that Investment Banking isn't for you - PPE will put you in good stead for almost any profession you can think of (Law, Teaching, Politics, Academia, Journalism; the list goes on).

    Just thought it may be something to consider. But before you write off PPE at Oxford because you think you have not got a chance of getting in (as so many people do) - this is not necessarily the case as the standard offer will almost certainly be AAA, possibly A*AA by the time you apply, which is in line with the other courses you mentioned. All I would say is don't just ignore the highly prestigious universities and courses because they seem unreachable (not that I'm saying you are necessarily doing this), just try to speak to people that have actually been successful at getting into these places (TSR is a great place to find them!) and ask them what they think... you'll be surprised at the number of people that get onto courses that they never dreamed they would qualify for, let alone make a successful application.
    Thanks for the lengthy reply, but I'm wondering if you've read my post. I've already retaken the entire year with different subjects, AND I'm retaking my business paper after messing up and getting a C first time round. I'm pretty sure this would exclude me from Oxbridge, plus my GCSEs are OK but not brilliant. (2 A*s, 6 As, 3Bs and 1d) Do you know any other good university courses for banking that doesn't strictly require maths? I was thinking about Banking and International Finance at CASS business school, because it's in London and all that.
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    Go with Economic History at LSE first choice, with those GCSEs and a stellar PS you shouldn't have any problems.
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    Go with Economic History at LSE first choice, with those GCSEs and a stellar PS you shouldn't have any problems.
    What about the fact that I resat my business paper? Would they care as much as Oxbridge?
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    (Original post by JBateman)
    So I recently decided that Investment Banking would be a great profession to get into, and I made a long term plan for achieving this target. I'm currently in year 12 doing my AS levels, so I think I still have lots of time to alter my planned route of breaking into this industry. Here it is:

    AS Levels:
    History: target = A
    Business: target = A
    ICT BTEC: target = Distinction* (Dropping at A level)
    English Literature target = A*

    After this I'll go on to do a 4-Year Business Management degree with a year in industry (preferably a bank), because economics will be too difficult to get into due my lack of studying Maths at A level. My possible university choices and standard offers (I haven't applied yet) are:
    - Bath Uni (AAA*) (Favourite choice so far)
    - Cass Business School (AAA)
    - Nottingham Uni (AAA)
    - Aston Uni (AAA)
    - York Uni (AAB) (I consider this a possible choice because it's closer to home)

    I then plan to get an MBA within 5 years of getting my bachelor degree; so far I haven't chosen any possible universities for this because it's a little too early.

    So is this a realistic option for getting into Investment Banking? My main worry is that I would need a maths A level and Economics degree to get into this type of profession, but I'm confident in my maths skill and most of the courses I've checked out offer economics as a module or optional module. Would this be ok? Also what do you think of my university choices? Are they good, which ones are better?

    Thanks in advance ^_^

    Hi

    I saw your post and thought I would shed some advice on how I got my offer in Investment Banking. (I got the first one I applied for).

    I would like to make it clear that I had no contacts in the Bank, I had no finance work experience and I didn't have Maths A level.

    My A Levels were:

    Psychology (A)
    Biology (A)
    Design and Technology (A)
    Economics (A)

    Undergraduate Degree (Warwick University)

    Bsc Psychology (2:1)


    Postgraduate Degree (University College London)

    MSc Management (Predicted Distinction)

    The first thing I would like to say is that I cannot emphasize how important it is to go to either Oxbridge - LSE - Imperial - UCL - Warwick.
    Recruiters actively seek these universities and it shows when you get down to the final interviews and assessment centers. In my experience I have only seen one person who wasn't from one of these universities, and they attended INSEAD.

    Perhaps most importantly is how you market yourself. You must have something different. They don't want identical drones, so make sure you sell yourself differently. For me I studied a lot of Behavioural Finance in my undergraduate degree and specialized my dissertation in the integration of psychological models within investment and financial decision making. Interviewers were refreshed to see someone different and as a result I out competed all the candidates who had Masters Degree's in Finance. One candidate even has a CFA level 2.

    You must prepare more than you think and align all your views with those of the Bank (economic outlook, company values etc..). For example I must have spent 70 hours in preparation for my interviews. Ranging from detailed knowledge of different Valuation methods (i.e DCF, P/E, EV analysis etc..) to what colour shirt and tie to wear.

    Also make sure you have extracurricular experience that will stimulate interest in your interviewers. One of my greatest tools I pushed was RedBull flugtag which I did last year, alongside more standard things such as being captain of a university sport team etc...

    Remember these people need to be able to work with you and they need to enjoy your company. Establish yourself as an asset to their company on both a professional and personal level.


    To summarsie.

    1. Go to a G6 University (i.e one of the 6 universities that IB's target, subject is less important). Preferably do an MSc as I would say 85% of the final round candidates had an MSc.

    2. Market yourself as someone who is different from the rest of the economic and finance graduates. You will stand out and if you are good and this can only work in your favor.

    3. Prepare more than everyone else. I revised harder for my interviews than many of my Finals at University. I ensured I had collated every possible financial and economic question they could ask me. Never was I asked a question I couldn't answer.

    4. Have good extracurricular experience and come across as a nice guy that they would enjoy working with.

    Those things I think will help you get the job.
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    (Original post by mayben90)
    Hi

    I saw your post and thought I would shed some advice on how I got my offer in Investment Banking. (I got the first one I applied for).

    I would like to make it clear that I had no contacts in the Bank, I had no finance work experience and I didn't have Maths A level.

    My A Levels were:

    Psychology (A)
    Biology (A)
    Design and Technology (A)
    Economics (A)

    Undergraduate Degree (Warwick University)

    Bsc Psychology (2:1)


    Postgraduate Degree (University College London)

    MSc Management (Predicted Distinction)

    The first thing I would like to say is that I cannot emphasize how important it is to go to either Oxbridge - LSE - Imperial - UCL - Warwick.
    Recruiters actively seek these universities and it shows when you get down to the final interviews and assessment centers. In my experience I have only seen one person who wasn't from one of these universities, and they attended INSEAD.

    Perhaps most importantly is how you market yourself. You must have something different. They don't want identical drones, so make sure you sell yourself differently. For me I studied a lot of Behavioural Finance in my undergraduate degree and specialized my dissertation in the integration of psychological models within investment and financial decision making. Interviewers were refreshed to see someone different and as a result I out competed all the candidates who had Masters Degree's in Finance. One candidate even has a CFA level 2.

    You must prepare more than you think and align all your views with those of the Bank (economic outlook, company values etc..). For example I must have spent 70 hours in preparation for my interviews. Ranging from detailed knowledge of different Valuation methods (i.e DCF, P/E, EV analysis etc..) to what colour shirt and tie to wear.

    Also make sure you have extracurricular experience that will stimulate interest in your interviewers. One of my greatest tools I pushed was RedBull flugtag which I did last year, alongside more standard things such as being captain of a university sport team etc...

    Remember these people need to be able to work with you and they need to enjoy your company. Establish yourself as an asset to their company on both a professional and personal level.


    To summarsie.

    1. Go to a G6 University (i.e one of the 6 universities that IB's target, subject is less important). Preferably do an MSc as I would say 85% of the final round candidates had an MSc.

    2. Market yourself as someone who is different from the rest of the economic and finance graduates. You will stand out and if you are good and this can only work in your favor.

    3. Prepare more than everyone else. I revised harder for my interviews than many of my Finals at University. I ensured I had collated every possible financial and economic question they could ask me. Never was I asked a question I couldn't answer.

    4. Have good extracurricular experience and come across as a nice guy that they would enjoy working with.

    Those things I think will help you get the job.
    Congratulations on your job and all the hard work.

    I have to say though, your advice will be terribly misleading to the naive sixth-former who's just decided he wants to be rich and has come on here to find out how.

    Go to a top 6 uni? By all means.
    Subject isn't that important? Not true: with the world and his mother graduating with a 2.1 these days, degree courses are becoming increasingly important. Sounds like you went for IBD, which can be more lenient on degree subject than other departments. Other areas will almost require a rigorously quantitative degree.
    Preferably do a masters? I think the majority of masters-takers will tell you that they are filling up a year whilst waiting for the next recruitment cycle, and would have much preferred a job straight out of undergrad.

    The rest I agree with. Although careful not to prepare tooooo hard for interviews, or you won't sound natural.

    You are a nice exhibit of how it is possible to break into IB through an unconventional route, but I would advise all you up-and-coming gordon gekkos to do maths, further maths, physics and economics, go on to LSE, spring week, internship, boom (or something similar )
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    (Original post by salmon1)
    Also, AAA for business at Aston? Grade inflation wtf?
    Oi, what's wrong with Aston

    KPMG is a bank!? :eek:
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    (Original post by M1011)
    KPMG is a bank!? :eek:
    KPMG aren't a bank they are more a professional service firm.
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    (Original post by non)
    KPMG aren't a bank they are more a professional service firm.
    I know, it was in jest because OP asked for example of a bank placement and KPMG aren't a bank. But ta

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