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Ranking of Econ grad schools

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Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
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    (Original post by beadyeye)
    yea waitlisted, but i'd much rather go to lse if i had the choice. people do consider lse as the better of the two if you're looking at economics. just offering my 2 cents worth. you're free to interpret my intentions as you wish.
    Better in what respect? Departmnts have their own strengths and weaknesses. People should choose primarily according to their academic interests.
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    (Original post by sj27)
    This shows exactly why choosing a school based on its ranking in one year vs another year is not such a good idea, because it could have changed again by the time you start, or by the time you graduate. And any decent school retains the ability to attract good academics. LSE might get some hotshots and bounce back up again while the unis they poached them from fall... So I think any school that is generally among the top for a reasonable length of time is fine...
    I want to know who left LSE over the past year. A sharp drop from top 10 to the world top 25 suggests a few world's top 5% economists left LSE
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    Definitely pick LSE. Oxford and LSE are top for economics Masters, Cambridge is unfortunately a tier lower. One of my economics professors at LSE, who did his undergrad at LSE and then postgrad at Cambridge, told me that he regrets having picked Cambridge over LSE for his Masters as it closed down doors for him. I know that LSE is ridiculously expensive, but EME at LSE is an absolutely amazingly well-reputed course. Do not turn it down.
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    (Original post by Swayum)
    Definitely pick LSE. Oxford and LSE are top for economics Masters, Cambridge is unfortunately a tier lower. One of my economics professors at LSE, who did his undergrad at LSE and then postgrad at Cambridge, told me that he regrets having picked Cambridge over LSE for his Masters as it closed down doors for him. I know that LSE is ridiculously expensive, but EME at LSE is an absolutely amazingly well-reputed course. Do not turn it down.

    Are you contradicting yourself? A professor who did a BSc at LSE then Postgrad at Cam becomes a professor at LSE? So you mean that if he had done a postgrad at LSE/Ox then the "professor" at LSE would had become an Econ professor at Harvard? O_o

    Who is that professor? I am interested in his profile, I am sure I can find his CV on his webpage if I know his name

    And since his a Professor at LSE, I am not 100% convinced his story (on the assumption that you are telling us the truth or the professor told you what you wrote) due to issue about conflict of interests.
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    Actually statements like "my professor told XXXX is not good" is dubious. I personally do not think a professor would make such imprudent and immature statements, partiuclarly for professors at respectable universities.
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    I know they aren't quite in the same league as LSE and Oxford etc, but what is City university's Msc like?

    More expensive than most with it being in London at £9k, but there is a good range of options available.

    I should be getting a first in Econ + Finance from an 'average' uni, so LSE et al aren't really in my league, probably won't be even with a good GRE/GMAT score.

    Also if anyone could tell me what would be best between Bristol, York, Nottingham and City it would be much appreciated
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    (Original post by Fynch101)
    I know they aren't quite in the same league as LSE and Oxford etc, but what is City university's Msc like?

    More expensive than most with it being in London at £9k, but there is a good range of options available.

    I should be getting a first in Econ + Finance from an 'average' uni, so LSE et al aren't really in my league, probably won't be even with a good GRE/GMAT score.

    Also if anyone could tell me what would be best between Bristol, York, Nottingham and City it would be much appreciated
    Hmm... This thread is about ranking among LSE, UCL, Cam, Barcelona etc... you probably need to start a new thread.
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    (Original post by Lalafell)
    Hmm... This thread is about ranking among LSE, UCL, Cam, Barcelona etc... you probably need to start a new thread.
    Maybe if you read the title again you would change your mind?
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    (Original post by Lalafell)
    Are you contradicting yourself? A professor who did a BSc at LSE then Postgrad at Cam becomes a professor at LSE? So you mean that if he had done a postgrad at LSE/Ox then the "professor" at LSE would had become an Econ professor at Harvard? O_o

    Who is that professor? I am interested in his profile, I am sure I can find his CV on his webpage if I know his name

    And since his a Professor at LSE, I am not 100% convinced his story (on the assumption that you are telling us the truth or the professor told you what you wrote) due to issue about conflict of interests.
    I know which professor he's talking about, he said similar things to myself last year.
    Don't want to throw his name around random message boards however...
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    (Original post by Fynch101)

    I should be getting a first in Econ + Finance from an 'average' uni, so LSE et al aren't really in my league, probably won't be even with a good GRE/GMAT score.
    This assumption is incorrect - the unis are far more interested in your grades than where you did undergrad. However you may have left it a bit late to apply for the 2012 year at the top unis now.
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    I would go with either LSE or UCL for the strength of their departments and research quality.

    You do know that EME at LSE is radically different to normal MSc Econ?
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    (Original post by sj27)
    This assumption is incorrect - the unis are far more interested in your grades than where you did undergrad. However you may have left it a bit late to apply for the 2012 year at the top unis now.
    I know, luckily I'm more than prepared to take a gap year now. Hopefully in this time I can do the GMAT/GRE and get a supportive score. I still think I'll get a few offers though. I averaged 77% in my first set of exams in 3rd year.
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    (Original post by Lalafell)
    Are you contradicting yourself? A professor who did a BSc at LSE then Postgrad at Cam becomes a professor at LSE? So you mean that if he had done a postgrad at LSE/Ox then the "professor" at LSE would had become an Econ professor at Harvard? O_o

    Who is that professor? I am interested in his profile, I am sure I can find his CV on his webpage if I know his name

    And since his a Professor at LSE, I am not 100% convinced his story (on the assumption that you are telling us the truth or the professor told you what you wrote) due to issue about conflict of interests.
    After doing his Masters at Cambridge, he ended up doing his PhD there also. What I'm guessing he meant is that he didn't get any PhD offers from the US, which is the best place to do a PhD in Economics, but I'm not entirely sure which doors were closed from him (I wasn't going to ask such an uncomfortable question, was I?).

    What conflict of interest are you talking about? I was just asking him for advice about where to do a Masters, so he told me that Cambridge is not as well-reputed as LSE, when I thought it was the opposite (certainly at undergrad Cambridge IS very good).

    I will PM you his name, but don't post it in the public forums.

    Why would I lie anyway? I have nothing to gain by misleading the OP.
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    (Original post by Swayum)
    After doing his Masters at Cambridge, he ended up doing his PhD there also. What I'm guessing he meant is that he didn't get any PhD offers from the US, which is the best place to do a PhD in Economics, but I'm not entirely sure which doors were closed from him (I wasn't going to ask such an uncomfortable question, was I?).

    What conflict of interest are you talking about? I was just asking him for advice about where to do a Masters, so he told me that Cambridge is not as well-reputed as LSE, when I thought it was the opposite (certainly at undergrad Cambridge IS very good).

    I will PM you his name, but don't post it in the public forums.

    Why would I lie anyway? I have nothing to gain by misleading the OP.

    Thank you for your PM. What I meant by conflict of interests is conflict of interests in general. A staff at LSE Econ department would certantly have an interest in seeing LSE getting the best students and therefore a staff saying at LSe saying that "XXX is not good" is equivalent to a vendor on the street saying "my stuff is better than others". As such, I am not 100% convinced what you wrote.

    With respect to getting into US PhD, it is still quite dubious. Actually, you don't need a master to apply for US PhDs; people are actually doing a PhD in the US right after their undergrads. A person with a first class BSc Economics at LSE could not get into US PhD may well indicate that there are some factors apart from academic merits which "close his doors".

    But actually, that person is an outstanding Econ scholar without doubt as he is able to publish at the American Economic Review and Journal of Monetary Economics right after graduation. And I personally think he should really thank Cambridge to train him to be able to do so as it is quite rare for a recent graduate to have such outstanding performance. For instane, if you check the profile of another recent recruit at LSE, although the other person with a PhD from Harvard and graduate and join LSE roughtly at the same time, that person does not have such publication records.


    As such, I am still not 100% convinced that person would say "XXXX is not good; closed his door" as such statement is really immature and imprudent.
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    (Original post by Swayum)
    After doing his Masters at Cambridge, he ended up doing his PhD there also. What I'm guessing he meant is that he didn't get any PhD offers from the US, which is the best place to do a PhD in Economics, but I'm not entirely sure which doors were closed from him (I wasn't going to ask such an uncomfortable question, was I?).
    I don't want to take a combative approach, or question your prof's motives, but I do find this odd. It's entirely possible, if this was indeed the case, that it was factors other than Cambridge that were in his way - for example, it's well known that US unis place a lot of emphasis on non-academic factors as well (extra curriculars, etc. MIT actually have a box on their application form asking what volunteer/charity etc work you have been involved in). Also, if you do a google search with the terms M Phil Cambridge PhD [top US uni name] economics, there are enough hits to make you question this. I'm not saying what the prof told you is untrue, but maybe Cambridge was being blamed when something else was at fault. In any case, as he has ended up teaching at LSE, it hardly seems to have been a train smash...
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    (Original post by Lalafell)
    Thank you for your PM. What I meant by conflict of interests is conflict of interests in general. A staff at LSE Econ department would certantly have an interest in seeing LSE getting the best students and therefore a staff saying at LSe saying that "XXX is not good" is equivalent to a vendor on the street saying "my stuff is better than others". As such, I am not 100% convinced what you wrote.
    I see where you're coming from now, but nope, I don't think that was really the case to be honest. Cambridge no doubt does have a declining reputation in economics, virtually all informed posts in this thread above confirm this. Quite a few lecturers have told me to leave LSE btw (I applied for Masters in Finance) because they think it's better to experience new things and make new contacts - it's not really the case that they need to convince people to stay on at LSE: there's a huge demand for courses like Economics and Finance, so the lecturers are able to give you the right advice.

    With respect to getting into US PhD, it is still quite dubious. Actually, you don't need a master to apply for US PhDs; people are actually doing a PhD in the US right after their undergrads. A person with a first class BSc Economics at LSE could not get into US PhD may well indicate that there are some factors apart from academic merits which "close his doors".
    A first class BSc in Economics from LSE does not get you into the top PhD programmes in the US. The type of people that go straight into top PhD programmes from undergrad are the people already studying in the top places. Most people in the US come to Europe to do a Masters and then apply for a PhD from here - this significantly boosts their application. I can't think of a single person doing straight economics at LSE who's got a PhD offer (and I know most of the top Economics students in my year), they're mostly applying for Masters (a friend of mine has offers from Cambridge, Oxford and LSE).

    As such, I am still not 100% convinced that person would say "XXXX is not good; closed his door" as such statement is really immature and imprudent.
    I don't see how it's immature at all. As far as imprudent goes, he was just telling me his own life experience. He picked Cambridge because he wanted a change and because it was a lot cheaper, but he feels he would have done better at LSE. It would be like me saying something like "I feel I may have done better if I accepted my Imperial maths offer over my LSE offer" - there's nothing wrong with me saying that (although it's not true actually).
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    (Original post by wadders24)
    Ok, so I've received some pretty good offers and need to decide where to go. My goal is to take the PhD and move into academia, but this will be tough, so I also need to consider the private sector reputation. To a lesser extent, I am also interested in value for money.

    Offers:

    LSE - MSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics (Research)
    UCL - MSc Economics
    Barcelona Graduate School of Economics - MSc Economics
    Cambridge - MPhil Economic Research
    Birkbeck - MSc Economics
    Manchester - MSc Economics and Econometrics
    York - MSc Economics.

    I am finding this really tough, and it's a huge investment. What are people's thoughts on the schools/courses, and does anybody have any experience of them?

    Thanks, I will really appreciate any responses!!!!!

    guys can someone tell me what offers they got for school of hogwards, so trynna get in to that school, anyone help plz
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    A first class BSc in Economics does not get you into the top PhD programmes in the US, I can guarantee you that. The type of people that go straight into top PhD programmes from undergrad are the people already studying in the top places. Most people in the US come to Europe to do a Masters and then apply for a PhD from here - this significantly boosts their application. I can't think of a single person doing straight economics at LSE who's got a PhD offer (and I know most of the top Economics students in my year).



    Hmm... I am still not so convinced. As at UCL, every year there are some BSc graduates got into top Econ PhDs (e.g. Chicago, Columbia, Northwestern) in the US right after their graduaion.
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    Probably one of the main reasons is that L101 Econ gradutes at UCL have the chance to study in some of the top US Econ departments for a year but I also expect that LSE students should be equally advantageous to get into top US programs.

    http://www.ucl.ac.uk/economics/under...101_faqs/#host
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    (Original post by Lalafell)
    Probably one of the main reasons is that L101 Econ gradutes at UCL have the chance to study in some of the top US Econ departments for a year but I also expect that LSE students should be equally advantageous to get into top US programs.

    http://www.ucl.ac.uk/economics/under...101_faqs/#host
    Actually yes, I just thought of someone in the year above me who does have a top PhD offer (having spent 1 year working in the industry), but it's very rare tbh.

    In any case, going back to the subject at hand, the OP's best choice is LSE EME looking purely at the academic factors. If you want to factor in costs and stuff, it's harder to say.

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