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What advantages does going to Oxbridge actually bring?

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Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
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    Something to bear in mind: one only really hears about the Oxford and Cambridge successes.

    Its a two way street as always, OXford and Cambridge have massive advantages that they can offer to you - social, sports , academic, job wise, but you have to seek them out and take them, same as any other uni.

    If you don't take the advantages offered, going there won't give you anything more than a nice name on your cv.
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    (Original post by Tsunami2011)
    You do not need to study Economics to be a banker.. you will find Zoology graduates from Cambridge in front office banking.
    Yeah but it would not be advisable for the average state school educated guy to go to Cambridge for Zoology with the intention of working in an investment bank.

    Those who do tend to be public school kids who want the Cambridge education and have the contacts to make the subject of their degree meaningless.
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    Helps the ego
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    Bubblyjubbly will take you and your degree seriously.
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    (Original post by t0ffee)
    Yeah but it would not be advisable for the average state school educated guy to go to Cambridge for Zoology with the intention of working in an investment bank.

    Those who do tend to be public school kids who want the Cambridge education and have the contacts to make the subject of their degree meaningless.
    Even generally speaking you do not need an Economics degree. Even if a role is highly mathematical, a maths or science degree would be more appriorate. You will find a good amount of Law, History, English, Politics, and science grads working at the bulge bracket banks in FO and not only from Cambridge or Oxford, but places like LSE, UCL, Imperial, Warwick,etc.
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    Bubblyjubbly will take you and your degree seriously.
    Only if you go into investment banking
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    Bubblyjubbly will take you and your degree seriously.
    :rofl:

    Repped :cool:
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    (I'm going to answer this from a Cambridge point of view - I'm assuming Oxford is similar.)

    Obviously the prestige is a positive, but there are much more substantial reasons why Cambridge is a great place to study.

    The standard of teaching across the university is fantastic. The courses are rigorous and challenging. In general, the "Tripos" system allows you to start your degree by obtaining a broad overview of your subject, before you specialise in the final year or two. The variety of options in your final year(s) is great - for example, in my subject (maths), there are about 36 third-year courses (and even more in the fourth year), of which you choose about 8. This is going to allow me to study my specific interests at a very high level next year, which is very exciting.

    The collegiate system is wonderful, and only a handful of universities have it. The University of Cambridge is comprised of 31 colleges, which allows you to be part of a small and caring community which feels like a home, whilst also being part of a large, diverse university where there is so much to do. I love my college, and chose it because of its features (small, old, in the city centre), and yet I am also part of an amazing and prestigous university. Different people may prefer different colleges - you may want a larger or more modern college. Colleges have their own accommodation, canteens, student unions, facilities, libraries... etc.

    A huge advantage is that the university and its colleges have huge financial resources, despite the fact that you pay the same tuition fees as everyone else. This means that they are able to provide supervisions - world-class teaching on a one-to-one or two-to-one basis with academics. Also, it allows them to provide huge bursaries (£3,500 per year for students with a household income of less than £25,000, on top of what the Government gives you!) and help those who find themselves in financial difficulty (it is official university policy that a home student will never have to leave their studies for financial reasons). Also, most colleges offer college-owned accommodation to undergraduates for at least three years, which is cheaper and easier than having to find your own place and negotiate with landlords. The city is not particularly expensive to live in, either.

    The number of extra-curricular activities and societies available at Cambridge is huge. If you're interested in something, there will probably be an active society for it. As well as at the university level, most colleges have teams in several sports which are open to anyone of any level. If you're not interested in it or you've never done it before, you might end up doing it - for example, I rowed for a term, which was completely free (at my college) and was good fun.

    Also, the fact that you get to feel posh and go to May Balls and formal hall and wear gowns and stuff even though you went to a state school in Bolton.

    To directly answer your question: lots.
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    That comparison doesn't exactly work though because Oxford doesn't offer creative writing at undergrad level :nah:

    I'd say Oxford has given me various advantages that other unis (Cambridge aside) can't offer in the same way/at the same level. These include:
    -the chance to study a far more advanced curriculum than other unis offer
    - honing my writing skills
    -the tutorial system (obviously)
    - wider extra curricular opportunities whilst I was there and the benefits that has on my CV
    - very close monitoring of work
    - close relationships/interactions with world-leading/upcoming academics
    - the prestige factor, of course
    - very close, personal pastoral care that wouldn't be feasible at most other unis- a bursary so huge and generous that it is kinda funding my MA

    I got the distinct impression at my Masters application interviews (which were post-Finals results) that they could easily tell that I was not a 2.2 standard applicant, even though that's what I am on paper. There seemed to be a great deal of respect for and acknowledgment of the training I had undergone at Oxford.

    On a more random note, applying to be a reader at the British Library became a piece of cake as soon as the man processing the form realised I was from Oxford

    Of course, it makes for great stories to tell at parties and easy small talk :yes:

    In short, there were a lot of advantages for me
    I recall you mentioning you had schizoaffective disorder or some other mental illness of some sort. I have my fair share of mental disorders and disabilities, so would you say that Oxford are a great support system when it comes to such matters? I was weary of applying to Oxford because I wasn't sure of the pastoral support i'd receive. What's your experience?
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    (Original post by Sir Fox)
    You are making a fool of yourself. Yes, Oxford and Cambridge are considerably better than other universities and also have an edge on very good ones, but all this "a 2.2 degree in a random subject from Oxford beets everything from Singapur to California" talking is simply ridiculous. You want to tell me a music graduate from Oxford is more suitable for banking than an economics graduate from another university? Tell you what, without additional qualification and any specific financial knowledge your Oxford musician would not hold his ground against a London Met graduate who studied accounting or economics, because he JUST HASN'T THE RELEVANT KNOWLEDGE.
    You'd be surprised. Firstly, accounting is a bit pointless when it comes to getting into the financial sector. Accounting is accounting. It's not much better for banking than music is. Totally different set of domain knowledge. They both have a lot of numbers in them, but that's about it.

    Economics, probably more likely - but certainly not from a bad university. Domain knowledge can be picked up quite easily, and banks like Goldman Sachs are perfectly happy to pick up people with arts degrees, even for investment banking.

    I just went through the Goldman Sachs 'Choose your place' quiz, answering for a music grad I just made up (focuses on the details, can multitask well, etc) and it recommended investment banker.
    Try it: http://www.goldmansachs.com/careers/...ace/index.html
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Oxford does have creative writing courses. They are just not as visible as some other courses.


    http://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/details.php?id=65

    http://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/courses/details.php?id=20
    Masters degrees don't count, because they're so widespread. It's indisputable that for certain topics, certain universities do the best masters degrees, even if their undergraduate programs or research as a whole aren't up to scratch.
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    (Original post by CHY872)


    Masters degrees don't count, because they're so widespread. It's indisputable that for certain topics, certain universities do the best masters degrees, even if their undergraduate programs or research as a whole aren't up to scratch.
    LGH's points were valid ones.

    However, of course masters degrees "count". Most of the participants on TSR are looking for full-time undergraduate places. As a result they tend to disregard or play down all aspects of universities which are not concerned with full-time undergraduate study.

    If one puts this into perspective, the QS Rankings of universities only include two metrics concerned with undergraduate education; the ratio of undergraduate to post-graduate students where the fewer the proportion of undergraduates the higher the rating and the number of nations from which students come. This would be seen as totally baffling to most of the posters on TSR.
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    (Original post by suicidaloverbusiness)
    I recall you mentioning you had schizoaffective disorder or some other mental illness of some sort. I have my fair share of mental disorders and disabilities, so would you say that Oxford are a great support system when it comes to such matters? I was weary of applying to Oxford because I wasn't sure of the pastoral support i'd receive. What's your experience?
    Of course it depends on the nature of the people you encounter. It could be that I just got extremely lucky - I don't know. I did have a numpty tutor or two who said un-PC things or wasn't very helpful... but then on the other hand I had the most amazing welfare tutors completely *******ing anyone who upset me :yep:

    I had two incredible welfare tutors look after me when I entered into a major psychotic episode. At my very worst points, I'd be at their door every other day. I could phone them up and ask to see them and they'd always somehow find the time to squeeze me in at the last minute. They spent a lot of time and energy on me and I'll never forget their kindness. I seriously doubt that that level of close pastoral care could be achieved at non-collegiate unis, simply because welfare staff at those unis will have a greater number of people to take care of. Also you wouldn't necessarily know (of) the welfare staff before you approached them because most of them wouldn't live within the uni and you're not in a small community where everyone has a sense of everyone else.

    Of course, Oxford wasn't perfect. Mistakes were made and things overlooked. For example, no one suggested DSA for me when I was at Oxford. I'd never even heard of DSA, aside from on this forum. Whereas when I went to Goldsmiths, that was one of the first things they said to me :yes:
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    It brings you the exceedingly privileged right to sing the theme from 'chariots of fire' whilst walking about campus.



    What have you got on your back Montagu? Bloody rockets?
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    (Original post by Bubblyjubbly)
    As for computer science, bollox. Goldman is clearly stuffed with LSE graduates on account of location and contacts, nothing else.
    Haha, I have met many oxford and cambridge students at assessment centres and interviews.

    I promise you they are nothing special - In fact I got the position and they didn't.

    Honestly I know you are just trolling for oxbridge probably the spawn of imsoacademic.
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    End of the day, the prestige of your university matters not - it's all about results

    Why would someone hire a gu who got a 2:2 degree or a 3rd degree at Oxford, whilst someone at a less prestigious one (Wolves?) got a first!

    I mean c'mon! It's not the upbringing, it's the skills you have after uni which is important!
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    LGH's points were valid ones.

    However, of course masters degrees "count". Most of the participants on TSR are looking for full-time undergraduate places. As a result they tend to disregard or play down all aspects of universities which are not concerned with full-time undergraduate study.

    If one puts this into perspective, the QS Rankings of universities only include two metrics concerned with undergraduate education; the ratio of undergraduate to post-graduate students where the fewer the proportion of undergraduates the higher the rating and the number of nations from which students come. This would be seen as totally baffling to most of the posters on TSR.
    My issue with discussing Masters and further degrees in this thread is that the advantages blur massively, because of the resources and supervisors etc. Different universities have different strengths and research groups, so for many subjects you'd be much better off going to a well supported, well researched course at a 'lower' university than the equivalent course at Oxford. For example,

    (Original post by evantej)
    If I wanted to study Tolstoy's historical influence upon Britain at doctoral level then the best place for me would be Northumbria University. If I studied elsewhere academics would question me immediately why I did not study there.
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    (Original post by Harry S Truman)
    Sixty-seven figure salary as soon as you graduate.
    why all the negs for this?? :confused:
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    it wont give u more disadvantages if u chose a sane employer. tutorials at oxbridge are one of the most stimulating way to learn
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    Newsflash: Getting in to Oxbridge does not make you clever. To get into Oxbridge you need 3 As or A*s or whatever (it has changed since I was applying) To suggest that someone getting into Oxbridge is an indication of cleverness, is akin to saying A-Levels are an indicator of cleverness. Anyone who thinks A-Levels indicate how clever someone is is an absolute moron.
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Of course, Oxford wasn't perfect. Mistakes were made and things overlooked. For example, no one suggested DSA for me when I was at Oxford. I'd never even heard of DSA, aside from on this forum. Whereas when I went to Goldsmiths, that was one of the first things they said to me :yes:
    In terms of DSA, I suspect this may have something to do with the collegiate system so they are not as 'specialise' and 'procedural' on dealing with the applicants/state benefit system. Also, there may be some contribution from the large amount of our students coming from private school so money wise maybe a less important issue.

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