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Is it ethical that Coca- Cola and McDonald´s sponsor The olympics?

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    (Original post by Smack)
    Sport - and the Olympics - is not about healthy eating nor healthy living. It is about engaging in competition for either enjoyment or monetary gain. Whilst sport may be a healthy pastime for many, at the Olympic and professional levels it is certainly not; the training required puts an enormous amount of strain on the body and, well, the human body is simply not designed to do the stuff that's seen at the top levels. And you'll find that many top level athletes eat more than their fair share of junk food like McDonald's to help keep up their calories to sustain their training. And don't forget the steroids either!

    So yes it's ethical that Coca-Cola and McDonald's can sponsor the Olympics because they're all bad for your health in some way.
    There´s definitely different viewpoints on that, some argue that the body is not designed to do what we are doing right now; sit still in front of a computer.
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    (Original post by NB_ide)
    The only people who make such meaningless claims are unthinking new-to-weightlifting idiots in the fitness section of TSR.

    Like, what does that even mean? That if you change your diet but do no training, you'll get more than 50% of the total results available to you if you ate properly AND trained? Like, if I eat as a swimmer eats, I'll get better at swimming?
    Seriously how does it work? In what sense is the eating "more important" than training?

    Diet is only important in trying to directly manipulate bodyweight up or down - apart from that you can just eat any old **** and it hardly takes a genius to figure out what foods you like to eat and get eat enough of. A hard-training athlete needs to just eat "plenty" of food, and I assure you a lot of that is ****e. I train or work with lots of athletes, in various sports over the years, and a few (maybe 10%) are into the classic "healthy eating" game but they never seemed to benefit very much from it, if at all. A fair few end up broken from it, they get obsessed with it all and miss the bigger picture, and fail to thrive compared to their colleagues who just eat whatever their appetite demands.
    Getting a nice 1600-calorie McDonald's after a workout is ****ing excellent and is pretty much ideal for any athlete. For sedentary single mothers and their young children? Maybe not. But the Olympics is about sport obv.




    Sounds complicated.



    Blamed fairly?



    They promote whatever the hell they're paid to promote.

    In this case, McD's and coke.
    well,except from Usain Bolt I haven´t heard of any athlete that regularly eat junk-food. I can´t convince you to follow my thoughts here but I will claim that there´s not a single high-performing runner in the world who is not paying attention to their eating. It´s not about getting enough calories in one day, it´s about what is in the calories you eat. When you work-out, you break down your body. To restore your muscles you need the right type of food, for example protein is needed to build muscles. As I said, McDonald´s is basically empty calories that won´t restore your cells in any way. if you have a work-out and eat junk-food right after you will continue to break down your body. This is not something I´m saying but top nutritionists. This link sums it up pretty well: http://www.menshealth.com/weight-los...nd-working-out (diet at the end)
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    (Original post by NB_ide)
    The only people who make such meaningless claims are unthinking new-to-weightlifting idiots in the fitness section of TSR.

    Like, what does that even mean? That if you change your diet but do no training, you'll get more than 50% of the total results available to you if you ate properly AND trained? Like, if I eat as a swimmer eats, I'll get better at swimming?
    Seriously how does it work? In what sense is the eating "more important" than training?

    Diet is only important in trying to directly manipulate bodyweight up or down - apart from that you can just eat any old **** and it hardly takes a genius to figure out what foods you like to eat and get eat enough of. A hard-training athlete needs to just eat "plenty" of food, and I assure you a lot of that is ****e. I train or work with lots of athletes, in various sports over the years, and a few (maybe 10%) are into the classic "healthy eating" game but they never seemed to benefit very much from it, if at all. A fair few end up broken from it, they get obsessed with it all and miss the bigger picture, and fail to thrive compared to their colleagues who just eat whatever their appetite demands.
    Getting a nice 1600-calorie McDonald's after a workout is ****ing excellent and is pretty much ideal for any athlete. For sedentary single mothers and their young children? Maybe not. But the Olympics is about sport obv.




    Sounds complicated.



    Blamed fairly?



    They promote whatever the hell they're paid to promote.

    In this case, McD's and coke.
    Also, what I wrote about food being more important than training means that the results from the training will be lost if they don´t eat the right food. It does not mean that you can stop training, eat well and have the same results.
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28524942.../#.T2HL65g5DzI

    I said that some people say this, not everyone. Since I´m from Norway where cross-country skiing is quite popular I can say that many of our top skiers have in fact mentioned diet as the key to good results.
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    (Original post by MissNewfarm)
    Thank you so much for the link! you´re very right!
    no worries

    there is a very good book about the business side of the games and the IOC, i read it a few years ago, think this is it
    http://bookshop.blackwell.co.uk/jsp/.../9780470838709
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    The more they pay, the less tax payers have to.
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    (Original post by ArcadiaHouse)
    Adele is also performing at the Closing Ceremony ...
    Lmfao.

    Please respond to my message sent ooh a good week ago now
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    (Original post by morris743)
    Lmfao.

    Please respond to my message sent ooh a good week ago now


    You know where I've been
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    (Original post by MissNewfarm)
    I´m working on a very interesting project for my Master degree in London where I examine how companies such as McDonald´s and Coca-Cola can sponsor the olympics. Is it okay that this organised event, promoting sport, healthy eating and being a good role model, is sponsored by brands promoting the exact opposite? Should the organisers exclude such sponsors even if they will suffer a significant financial loss?

    Please let me know your thoughts!
    McDonalds don't make you eat there all the time; you do it yourself, of your own free will. The Coca-Cola Company don't make you drink it all the time; you do it out of your own free will.

    At the end of the day, those companies have made billions of pounds out of people, and the Olympics needs money to go ahead. Yes, it might pull people in to buy their Olympics promotional products, but there is nothing inherently unethical in sponsoring a sporting event when you have a lot of money.
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    (Original post by NB_ide)
    The only people who make such meaningless claims are unthinking new-to-weightlifting idiots in the fitness section of TSR.

    Like, what does that even mean? That if you change your diet but do no training, you'll get more than 50% of the total results available to you if you ate properly AND trained? Like, if I eat as a swimmer eats, I'll get better at swimming?
    Seriously how does it work? In what sense is the eating "more important" than training?

    Diet is only important in trying to directly manipulate bodyweight up or down - apart from that you can just eat any old **** and it hardly takes a genius to figure out what foods you like to eat and get eat enough of. A hard-training athlete needs to just eat "plenty" of food, and I assure you a lot of that is ****e. I train or work with lots of athletes, in various sports over the years, and a few (maybe 10%) are into the classic "healthy eating" game but they never seemed to benefit very much from it, if at all. A fair few end up broken from it, they get obsessed with it all and miss the bigger picture, and fail to thrive compared to their colleagues who just eat whatever their appetite demands.
    Getting a nice 1600-calorie McDonald's after a workout is ****ing excellent and is pretty much ideal for any athlete. For sedentary single mothers and their young children? Maybe not. But the Olympics is about sport obv.




    Sounds complicated.



    Blamed fairl


    They promote whatever the hell they're paid to promote.

    In this case, McD's and coke.
    I have to call be on this... Seriously, you don't think diet has an impact? As a swimmer, if you eat like me (which is pretty much exactly the same as any hard gaining athlete, loads of carbs and loads of protein) you won't look like, true. However in order to get the most out of training you must eat healthily, it is a well documented fact that overuse of simple carbs post workout releases insulin. And encourages fat storage. Likewise over consumption of saturated fat calories o er good stuff like protein and unsaturated fats, aMino acids etc will also hinder your progress in the long term.
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    (Original post by ArcadiaHouse)


    You know where I've been
    On TSR, yes.
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    (Original post by morris743)
    On TSR, yes.
    Bro, I've been in East Sussex, remember? :puppyeyes:
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    (Original post by ArcadiaHouse)
    Bro, I've been in East Sussex, remember? :puppyeyes:
    On TSR. I know.
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    (Original post by Ocassus)
    I have to call be on this... Seriously, you don't think diet has an impact?
    I do think one's diet has an impact on athletic performance

    As a swimmer, if you eat like me (which is pretty much exactly the same as any hard gaining athlete, loads of carbs and loads of protein) you won't look like, true. However in order to get the most out of training you must eat healthily, it is a well documented fact that overuse of simple carbs post workout releases insulin. And encourages fat storage. Likewise over consumption of saturated fat calories o er good stuff like protein and unsaturated fats, aMino acids etc will also hinder your progress in the long term.
    easily achieved with McDonald's and Coke.

    furthermore, ways of eating that maximise athletic performance can themselves be at the detriment of one's overall health and longevity, so it's still not "healthy eating" that goes along with sport. It's eating for performance, not "health".
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    (Original post by NB_ide)
    I do think one's diet has an impact on athletic performance



    easily achieved with McDonald's and Coke.

    furthermore, ways of eating that maximise athletic performance can themselves be at the detriment of one's overall health and longevity, so it's still not "healthy eating" that goes along with sport. It's eating for performance, not "health".
    Wait no hang on a second.

    You cannot achieve high performance OR good health by eating McDonalds on a regular basis. McDonalds will severely impact your ability to make gains in any respective field (Endurance or Strength).
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    I don't really buy into the whole corporations are out to get us bull****. As far as I'm concerned, you have a choice as to whether or not to be influenced by adverts. If you want to go to Mcdonalds, then do so, we are all aware of the health risks. But don't try and blame it on the advertisements.
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    (Original post by mczakk)
    no worries

    there is a very good book about the business side of the games and the IOC, i read it a few years ago, think this is it
    http://bookshop.blackwell.co.uk/jsp/.../9780470838709
    Fantastic! This will be so useful! Thank you once again!
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    (Original post by Tootles)
    McDonalds don't make you eat there all the time; you do it yourself, of your own free will. The Coca-Cola Company don't make you drink it all the time; you do it out of your own free will.

    At the end of the day, those companies have made billions of pounds out of people, and the Olympics needs money to go ahead. Yes, it might pull people in to buy their Olympics promotional products, but there is nothing inherently unethical in sponsoring a sporting event when you have a lot of money.
    Thank you for this!
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    (Original post by Ocassus)
    I have to call be on this... Seriously, you don't think diet has an impact? As a swimmer, if you eat like me (which is pretty much exactly the same as any hard gaining athlete, loads of carbs and loads of protein) you won't look like, true. However in order to get the most out of training you must eat healthily, it is a well documented fact that overuse of simple carbs post workout releases insulin. And encourages fat storage. Likewise over consumption of saturated fat calories o er good stuff like protein and unsaturated fats, aMino acids etc will also hinder your progress in the long term.
    thank you so much for giving us this information, it is quite clear that eating the right food is a big part of being an athlete.
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    (Original post by biffyclyro27)
    I don't really buy into the whole corporations are out to get us bull****. As far as I'm concerned, you have a choice as to whether or not to be influenced by adverts. If you want to go to Mcdonalds, then do so, we are all aware of the health risks. But don't try and blame it on the advertisements.
    This is a very important point. The fact that the products are there to buy is enough to cause harm for some...
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    (Original post by MissNewfarm)
    I´m working on a very interesting project for my Master degree in London where I examine how companies such as McDonald´s and Coca-Cola can sponsor the olympics. Is it okay that this organised event, promoting sport, healthy eating and being a good role model, is sponsored by brands promoting the exact opposite? Should the organisers exclude such sponsors even if they will suffer a significant financial loss?

    Please let me know your thoughts!
    Tbh, I think it's a disgrace.

    But no-one has the balls to say: "No, we don't want your billions of moneys because you significantly contribute to millions of deaths"

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