Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey there! Sign in to have your say on this topicNew here? Join for free to post

What does freedom mean to you?

Announcements Posted on
Fancy winning £500? Join the Summer Bucket List Challenge and beat the holiday boredom! 06-07-2015
Waiting on IB results? Our IB results hub explains everything you need to know 01-06-2015
  1. Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jack070)
    This is basically the same as posting the dictionary definition. In your own words maybe?
    Life, liberty, equality, Democracy and Capitalism.
  2. Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Destroyer25)
    You don't even believe in reasonable limits? Because all Western countries have reasonable limits on rights.
    No, that defeats the purpose of the word 'free'. I'm not talking purely about Western countries.
  3. Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kiss)
    No, that defeats the purpose of the word 'free'.
    How? What if your actions infringe on the freedom of others?
  4. Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I suppose just being alive. I'm free to live and I feel that's enough. I'm free to live my life without any curfews and limitations that I intend on bypassing, therefore that's freedom enough.
  5. Offline

    ReputationRep:
    - to do as I please without restriction
    - for no other human being to stop me from acting without restriction, in any conceivable sphere of human action
  6. Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by herbforde)
    - to do as I please without restriction
    - for no other human being to stop me from acting without restriction, in any conceivable sphere of human action
    So you should be able to murder if you feel like it?
  7. Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Free to do whatever the hell I want, whenever I want.

    Free from stress, worries etc. etc.

    I imagine myself on a beach by myself whenever I think of freedom.... don't know whyyyy
  8. Offline

    When my actions are dictated by the choices I make.
  9. Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I used to think that freedom was simply the absence of coercion but after reading some of the literature on it (which is intimidatingly extensive), I have become rather unsure about it.

    General piece of advice: Do not read (especially philosophy). Remain ignorant and happy.

    And yes, Socrates and Mill were wrong. Bentham ftw.
  10. Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Freedom is a social and historical achievement which is a result of the development of inter-recoginitional relationships between individuals. To be free is to be recognised as being free, and to recognise others as free. There is no natural capacity for free choice: free will is little more than a bourgeois illusion.
  11. Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I'm a big fan of John Stuart Mill's principle of liberty: the freedom to do whatever you want as long as you don't harm another without consent.

    (Original post by TheIronist)
    I used to think that freedom was simply the absence of coercion but after reading some of the literature on it (which is intimidatingly extensive), I have become rather unsure about it.

    General piece of advice: Do not read (especially philosophy). Remain ignorant and happy.
  12. Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Aleandcynicism)
    I'm a big fan of John Stuart Mill's principle of liberty: the freedom to do whatever you want as long as you don't harm another without consent.



    Not serious.

    Also, JS Mill's principle sounds excellent in theory (and I endorse it) but it doesn't say much about public policy. How would it apply, for example, with respect to the smoking ban?
  13. Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Ability to do anything available using only yourself, or others willing to take part, if a valid reason is present; this does not mean you cannot do something which will affect something else.
  14. Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TheIronist)
    Not serious.

    Also, JS Mill's principle sounds excellent in theory (and I endorse it) but it doesn't say much about public policy. How would it apply, for example, with respect to the smoking ban?
    That example comes up in so many discussions on liberty

    I can't really offer a definitive answer really. I know the arguments on both sides, so I'll cowardly shy away and say it's a good rule of thumb rather than outright practical advice.
  15. Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I'm from France, and to me, freedom is to be able to think in your own ways (which implies education for everyone) and to express your ideas when you feel they're relevant (which implies a lot of crap in public speech, but we already get by with this, don't we?).

    I still haven't sorted out the problem of property and such, so I will leave it alone for now.
  16. Offline

    ReputationRep:
    The condition of being free of restraints.
    Liberty of the person from slavery, detention, or oppression.
    Political independence.
    Exemption from the arbitrary exercise of authority in the performance of a specific action; civil liberty: freedom of assembly.
    Exemption from an unpleasant or onerous condition: freedom from want.
    The capacity to exercise choice; free will: We have the freedom to do as we please all afternoon.
    Ease or facility of movement: loose sports clothing, giving the wearer freedom.
    Frankness or boldness; lack of modesty or reserve: the new freedom in movies and novels.
    The right of enjoying all of the privileges of membership or citizenship: the freedom of the city.
    A right or the power to engage in certain actions without control or interference:
  17. Offline

    ReputationRep:
    The Freedom to do or say what I want without interference from the Government, so long as my actions do not affect others in a detrimental way.

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: March 19, 2012
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

New on TSR

IB results chat

Good luck everyone - loads of support here

Useful resources
x

Think you'll be in clearing or adjustment?

Hear direct from unis that want to talk to you

Get email alerts for university course places that match your subjects and grades. Just let us know what you're studying.

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.