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Please Advice..is LSE really worth 45k ??

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    (Original post by t0ffee)
    Go to manc then use the 45k to do a masters at Harvard or somewhere. An LSE degree isn't worth 45k.
    That's actually a good idea. Makes more sense to me.
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    (Original post by Physics Enemy)
    That's actually a good idea. Makes more sense to me.
    Agreed.

    :thumbsup:.
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    (Original post by Physics Enemy)
    That's actually a good idea. Makes more sense to me.
    Yes but getting into a masters at Harvard after going to manchester is probably more unlikely than getting into IB straight from Manchester. Takes a truly exceptional applicant.
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    If IB is your plan then LSE is the best university you could possibly got to for this.
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    (Original post by t0ffee)
    An LSE degree isn't worth 45k.
    What made you say so?
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    How the hell is simplicity getting all that rep over such a baseless argument? Are TSRians really this clueless? You'll have a tough time getting into IB through Manchester, whereas LSE is basically designed to get you into that sort of career. You'd be a fool not to choose LSE imo, and if your parents can afford it then why not? You can always pay them back overtime, and if you land a job in IB you can give them even more.
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    (Original post by hassi94)
    Yes but getting into a masters at Harvard after going to manchester is probably more unlikely than getting into IB straight from Manchester. Takes a truly exceptional applicant.
    I'd still prefer a Manchester BSc followed by an Oxbridge Masters. Won't cost 45k either.
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    Bloody hell. This thread is ANNOYING.

    It does not matter what university you go to, it's what you do with the opportunity and what you come out with that matters. How many of you on these threads have actually applied to a internship or a grad scheme? His something interesting for you; they do not once ask you what degree you are doing, what you are learning, or how successful you are. Aslong as you are on route to a 2.1 or more they're interested.

    Stop ranting and raving at your computer screen, I am about to answer the question "SO WHAT THE HELL DO THEY JUDGE YOU ON??"

    Your work experience, is the simple answer. How you have managed people, how you have performed in certain situations and how confident you are as a worker. THEN you pass tests ect ect and they thin all the candidates out one by one until they have the one they want.

    Fact of the matter is, you could be coming from a very unknown university and be sat in an interview with oxbridge candidates - but it's the person who is more suitible for the role that will get the position.

    OP - your brother can offer you internships that will probably be as impressive as studying at LSE. Go to Manchester, use the money to ensure that you do not have to work (other than internships) whilst studying and commit yourself fully to your course. Don't waste 45k.
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    YOU SHOULD TAKE THE MANCHESTER OFFER


    the manchester offer is a great opportunity.

    LSE does have a strong brand name, but it's certainly not worth £45k. sure, a relatively small proportion of manchester grads go into banking or other top grad jobs, but this is due to their personal qualities and career aspirations as much as the name on their degree. plus, the scholarship will stand out on your CV.

    if you are a quality candidate and have clear career goals, you should have no problem getting into IB. at a last resort, you could always do a msc elsewhere.

    finally, bear in mind that your future path is uncertain. why load yourself with debt for some marginal gain in prestige?
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    (Original post by hvh)
    Bloody hell. This thread is ANNOYING.

    It does not matter what university you go to, it's what you do with the opportunity and what you come out with that matters. How many of you on these threads have actually applied to a internship or a grad scheme? His something interesting for you; they do not once ask you what degree you are doing, what you are learning, or how successful you are. Aslong as you are on route to a 2.1 or more they're interested.

    Stop ranting and raving at your computer screen, I am about to answer the question "SO WHAT THE HELL DO THEY JUDGE YOU ON??"

    Your work experience, is the simple answer. How you have managed people, how you have performed in certain situations and how confident you are as a worker. THEN you pass tests ect ect and they thin all the candidates out one by one until they have the one they want.

    Fact of the matter is, you could be coming from a very unknown university and be sat in an interview with oxbridge candidates - but it's the person who is more suitible for the role that will get the position.

    OP - your brother can offer you internships that will probably be as impressive as studying at LSE. Go to Manchester, use the money to ensure that you do not have to work (other than internships) whilst studying and commit yourself fully to your course. Don't waste 45k.
    Most rationale post in the thread. :five:
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    Thats uite tough actually, by no means am i an expert, but from what i've heard LSE would undoubedly give you a leg up over Manchester especially considering its location and prowess. that being said though manchester is certainly nothing to turn your nose up at and as someone else said if only 2 people get that scholarship a year i'd take it ... the money saved will prove very helpful in the long run, you could always get a post grad from LSE if you feel the need anyway and it'd be cheaper than getting the BA, i assume.
    either way good luck with your choice
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    (Original post by Onewingedangel)
    38k.
    That's for economics though, I don't know about other courses.
    And LSE is not 35k, it's actually 33k, which is still the second highest.
    but 33k is the average over the whole school...we're including philosophy and geography grads here! Obviously Cambridge economics will have a higher average then the whole of LSE..
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    (Original post by hvh)
    Bloody hell. This thread is ANNOYING.

    It does not matter what university you go to, it's what you do with the opportunity and what you come out with that matters. How many of you on these threads have actually applied to a internship or a grad scheme? His something interesting for you; they do not once ask you what degree you are doing, what you are learning, or how successful you are. Aslong as you are on route to a 2.1 or more they're interested.

    Stop ranting and raving at your computer screen, I am about to answer the question "SO WHAT THE HELL DO THEY JUDGE YOU ON??"

    Your work experience, is the simple answer. How you have managed people, how you have performed in certain situations and how confident you are as a worker. THEN you pass tests ect ect and they thin all the candidates out one by one until they have the one they want.

    Fact of the matter is, you could be coming from a very unknown university and be sat in an interview with oxbridge candidates - but it's the person who is more suitible for the role that will get the position.

    OP - your brother can offer you internships that will probably be as impressive as studying at LSE. Go to Manchester, use the money to ensure that you do not have to work (other than internships) whilst studying and commit yourself fully to your course. Don't waste 45k.
    Totally agree. As I said in another thread:

    I've personally met, very recently may I add, two students who go to a university which isn't even in the top 100 in the UK (currently both are in their final year) and have both managed to get internships at BBs last summer with one being given a full time offer starting once he graduates this summer purely because they worked hard and had stellar ECs such as being co-presidents of their finance and investment societies. The fact that you already know what you want to do and have the chance to go to good (maybe not top) universities gives you the chance to put yourself ahead of most of the remaining flock.

    As I said the posters above do have very valid points about maybe having a slightly better chance by going to LSE, but contrary to what most people say, that's not the be all and end all. Outside interests and activities will count greatly towards helping you in addition to your uni and grades. And the fact that you have a scholarship offer to go to a university which is miles better than the ones those two guys go to still gives a great chance at making it so long as you work hard enough and do good extra curricular activities.
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    x is the probablility of you getting into investment banking if you end up going to Manchester.

    y is the probability of you getting into investment banking if you end up going to LSE.

    p is the lifetime income you'll earn from a job in investment banking.

    If (y-x)*p > (45k+additional living costs), which I'm pretty damn sure it will, then going to LSE makes more sense as long as your parents can afford it. I don't know what x and y are but I'm confident y is reasonably bigger than x.
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    Why do you apply for a course you can't afford?
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    (Original post by Arakasi 2.0)
    x is the probablility of you getting into investment banking if you end up going to Manchester.

    y is the probability of you getting into investment banking if you end up going to LSE.

    p is the lifetime income you'll earn from a job in investment banking.

    If (y-x)*p > (45k+additional living costs), which I'm pretty damn sure it will, then going to LSE makes more sense as long as your parents can afford it. I don't know what x and y are but I'm confident y is reasonably bigger than x.
    p should be the additional income he will earn from a grad job in investment banking, which may be a lot smaller than you think. what if he decides not to get into investment banking? what if his investment banking career doesn't last all that long?

    also, I'm not sure that the additional chance of success from attending the lse is that great once you take into account an individual's personal qualities and career ambitions.
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    (Original post by Scotgold)
    Hi All,

    I have an offer to study BSc. Maths and Econ at LSE. As an international student my tuition fee will approx be £15,000 p.a over 3 years (so 45k in total). But the issue is Uni of Manchester has offered me 100% scholarship for the same course. (Its a merit scholarship only offered to 2 students a year, I have 5As at A-Levels + some strong ECs).

    I am really keen on a pursuing a career in IB, so I dont know how much of a hurdle would choosing Manchester over LSE be ?? My family can manage to pay for LSE (with a bit of a stretch), but they are really proud of the scholarship and would love me to go for it.. but they have left the ultimate decision to me and I do not want to put too much pressure on them.

    So what do you guys suggest ?? If I work hard at Manchester and highlight my award + strong academics, will it give me good shot at IBs ? Or is LSE really a wortwhile investment ?
    Go Manchester. **** LSE.

    Good Luck!
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    (Original post by Arakasi 2.0)
    x is the probablility of you getting into investment banking if you end up going to Manchester.

    y is the probability of you getting into investment banking if you end up going to LSE.

    p is the lifetime income you'll earn from a job in investment banking.

    If (y-x)*p > (45k+additional living costs), which I'm pretty damn sure it will, then going to LSE makes more sense as long as your parents can afford it. I don't know what x and y are but I'm confident y is reasonably bigger than x.
    That's not spot on tho, as there's also the money made from a non IB role, to factor in as well. He might have say zero chance of an IB role after Manc, embellishing his LSE prospects at first glance; tho there are still good roles in the market leading to big money.
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    (Original post by lol_wut)
    p should be the additional income he will earn from a grad job in investment banking, which may be a lot smaller than you think. what if he decides not to get into investment banking? what if his investment banking career doesn't last all that long?
    (Original post by Physics Enemy)
    That's not spot on tho, as there's also the money made from a non IB role, to factor in as well. He might have say zero chance of an IB role after Manc, embellishing his LSE prospects at first glance; tho there are still good roles in the market leading to big money.
    I didn't want to overcomplicate it. Even if you just use addtional income the point remains the same.

    If he has a zero chance of getting into IB or he changes his mind then obviously this doesn't apply. I think it's safe to assume he's serious about IB otherwise this entire thread has no point.
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    (Original post by Arakasi 2.0)
    x is the probablility of you getting into investment banking if you end up going to Manchester.

    y is the probability of you getting into investment banking if you end up going to LSE.

    p is the lifetime income you'll earn from a job in investment banking.

    If (y)*p > (45k+additional living costs) || (x)*p > (45k+additional living costs) , which I'm pretty damn sure it will, then going to LSE makes more sense as long as your parents can afford it. I don't know what x and y are but I'm confident y is reasonably bigger than x.
    There. Fixed it for you.

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