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Please Advice..is LSE really worth 45k ??

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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    If you are the calibre of university entrant who can win a 100% scholarship for a competitive course at Manchester, then all things being equal, you will be the calibre of graduate who can sell themselves successfully to IBs without LSE on your CV.
    They aren't equal.

    And you've been around here long enough to know that by now.
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    Too many people on this thread aren't aware of what recruitment into the sharp end of finance is like.

    Even more painfully, too many people on this forum aren't in the industry.

    The value of having spent your university years with a bunch of people who are going to enter the industry is absolutely massive.

    My general opinion is that you're in a pretty dire place if the uninformed opinions of faceless students is going to sway your life choices.

    As a known professional in this industry, who has been giving advice to students for about eight years...

    1) 45k is a fairly trivial amount of money compared to the possible change in earnings. It's the kind of difference that can be flipped in a year or two.

    2) The ease of getting entry into the industry through LSE is substantial.

    3) The value of the network from a major university once you're in the industry is something that is difficult for me to judge but I know it's there. And I'm pretty sure that from Manchester, it's nothing.
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    (Original post by President_Ben)
    Too many people on this thread aren't aware of what recruitment into the sharp end of finance is like.

    Even more painfully, too many people on this forum aren't in the industry.

    The value of having spent your university years with a bunch of people who are going to enter the industry is absolutely massive.

    My general opinion is that you're in a pretty dire place if the uninformed opinions of faceless students is going to sway your life choices.

    As a known professional in this industry, who has been giving TROLLING students for about eight years...

    1) 45k is a fairly trivial amount of money compared to the possible change in earnings. It's the kind of difference that can be flipped in a year or two.

    2) The ease of getting entry into the industry through LSE is substantial.

    3) The value of the network from a major university once you're in the industry is something that is difficult for me to judge but I know it's there. And I'm pretty sure that from Manchester, it's nothing.
    all these future income calculations are based on an 18 year old's (probably) naive notion that he should become an investment banker.

    the network effects you mention aren't very important given that he has a close relative in the business already. plus it can be a mercy to miss out on three years of chat about internships

    i wouldn't expect any broader perspective from you though - when you're so blessed with personality, intelligence and originality i guess it's hard to look beyond one's own experience
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    (Original post by President_Ben)
    Too many people on this thread aren't aware of what recruitment into the sharp end of finance is like.

    Even more painfully, too many people on this forum aren't in the industry.

    The value of having spent your university years with a bunch of people who are going to enter the industry is absolutely massive.

    My general opinion is that you're in a pretty dire place if the uninformed opinions of faceless students is going to sway your life choices.

    As a known professional in this industry, who has been giving advice to students for about eight years...

    1) 45k is a fairly trivial amount of money compared to the possible change in earnings. It's the kind of difference that can be flipped in a year or two.

    2) The ease of getting entry into the industry through LSE is substantial.

    3) The value of the network from a major university once you're in the industry is something that is difficult for me to judge but I know it's there. And I'm pretty sure that from Manchester, it's nothing.
    Are you one of those people that will look at the something pretty, and like it, just because it looks pretty? I think you are.
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    (Original post by keepinorder)
    if it wasn't for stupid David Cameron you wouldn't have to pay £45 for three year. It's pathetic hateeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee eeeeeeeeeeee him so much!!!!!! arghhhhhhhhhhhh
    (btw if anyone negs me then you are really inconsiderate as your parents are probably paying for your fees so you have no worries, and if you neg me your paying for them then you are an idiot, and for anyone who is going to neg me because i have said do not neg me, lol)
    Can you report people for stupidity?
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    (Original post by President_Ben)
    Too many people on this thread aren't aware of what recruitment into the sharp end of finance is like.

    Even more painfully, too many people on this forum aren't in the industry.

    The value of having spent your university years with a bunch of people who are going to enter the industry is absolutely massive.

    My general opinion is that you're in a pretty dire place if the uninformed opinions of faceless students is going to sway your life choices.

    As a known professional in this industry, who has been giving advice to students for about eight years...

    1) 45k is a fairly trivial amount of money compared to the possible change in earnings. It's the kind of difference that can be flipped in a year or two.

    2) The ease of getting entry into the industry through LSE is substantial.

    3) The value of the network from a major university once you're in the industry is something that is difficult for me to judge but I know it's there. And I'm pretty sure that from Manchester, it's nothing.
    once you take into account a person's individual qualities, how much difference does the degree actually make?
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    Tough choice.

    If I had that choice to make though, I think I would choose LSE.

    Agree 100% with President_Ben's post.
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    (Original post by lol_wut)
    once you take into account a person's individual qualities, how much difference does the degree actually make?
    You develop as an individual during university.

    If you're at LSE, you can go on to run a society with something like a 50k a year budget running about 100 events with 3000 members. Or organise events with significant leading members of the industry. Create exclusive dinners, breakfasts and drinks sessions with people in the industry. Every week.

    You get a network to the industry that is very difficult to pull off outside of London because there isn't the critical mass of students and you can't really persuade the people you want to see, to go out of their way to visit Manchester. They can barely be bothered to ever make a social call to Oxford or Cambridge.
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    Having spent some time working in banking and having taken part in a number of recruitment events (CV Screening, Careers fairs, talks etc etc) I can tell you now that 45k is worthwhile.

    A lot of banks, particularly in the tough times, only look at a small set of universities for their pool of potential candidates. It sucks but it is what it is. I doubt Manchester is high up on that list for many of the banks. In my career I have met one student from Manchester with a front office job in finance and he worked for a second tier bank and had been made to interview despite having two internships with the bank beforehand.

    You can pay the 45k back very easily. The courses and probably nearly identical but there's nothing that beats brand value on the CV. And you can't start your entry for Uni of Manchester with, "I turned down LSE..."
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    (Original post by Kerpal)
    Having spent some time working in banking and having taken part in a number of recruitment events (CV Screening, Careers fairs, talks etc etc) I can tell you now that 45k is worthwhile.

    A lot of banks, particularly in the tough times, only look at a small set of universities for their pool of potential candidates. It sucks but it is what it is. I doubt Manchester is high up on that list for many of the banks. In my career I have met one student from Manchester with a front office job in finance and he worked for a second tier bank and had been made to interview despite having two internships with the bank beforehand.

    You can pay the 45k back very easily. The courses and probably nearly identical but there's nothing that beats brand value on the CV. And you can't start your entry for Uni of Manchester with, "I turned down LSE..."
    This sort of post failed to mention anything about the performance of the candidates. Moreover, it also failed to say anything about the turnover rates of these candidates. This sort of post hides itself from the pretentious and highly superficial world of 'brands' and 'superficial prestige' where as a matter of fact, at the end of the day, the performance of the candidates and their ability will matter the most.

    Also, by looking at the post's sample size (ONE person he met) and the very generalize (A LOT of banks), I highly doubt the OP should take the poster seriously..
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    £45k is nothing in comparison to what you will earn but if money is a real problem then go for Manchester. If you are hungry enough to get your foot in the door, you will.

    An class of 40 SAs will have 20 from the Oxbridge/Imperial/UCL/Warwick/Durham/Bristol/Bath/etc. 10 might be from European schools SSE/Bocc/HEC/ESSEC/IE blah. The other 10 will come from Leeds/Manchester/RH/Southampton/Edinburgh/St Andrews/Birmingham

    Just be on those mentioned in the last 10
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    (Original post by Paul Allen)
    £45k is nothing in comparison to what you will earn but if money is a real problem then go for Manchester. If you are hungry enough to get your foot in the door, you will.

    An class of 40 SAs will have 20 from the Oxbridge/Imperial/UCL/Warwick/Durham/Bristol/Bath/etc. 10 might be from European schools SSE/Bocc/HEC/ESSEC/IE blah. The other 10 will come from Leeds/Manchester/RH/Southampton/Edinburgh/St Andrews/Birmingham

    Just be on those mentioned in the last 10
    I going to agree with President_Ben here. As he said alluded to earlier, investment banking recruitment like many other things follows the Pareto Principle. That is, rougly 80% of the front office interns & graduates in London come from the 6 target UK universities (it's give or take 5% across different banks).

    So in an analyst class of 40, it's more likely to be 25-32 from the 6 target unis, and 1 or 2 maximum from some of the other unis you have mentioned. That's quite a signifcant difference. Being at a target university myself, you will find that at target unis it's normal for quite average students to get into banking, but at "lesser" universities it's only a handful of exceptional students who do. So there is a considerable bias.

    Ben also highlights the importance of your university - namely the career facilities and the opportunity to network - with bankers, and other students who will also be in the industry one day. Do not underestimate the value this has. There are only a handful of universities that present the best employment opportunities, and foster a culture that is geared towards getting their students into the "highest" professional careers, eg. investment banking. LSE is one of those universities, Manchester is not.

    OP, is this at all helps in your decision - last year, across 8 of the top 10 banks, there were 487 first year spring interns. 70 of those were from LSE (14.4%), second only to Oxford & Cambridge. Whilst only 5 (1.02%) came from Manchester. The odds seem stacked highly in favour of LSE.
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    (Original post by Zweihander)
    I going to agree with President_Ben here. As he said alluded to earlier, investment banking recruitment like many other things follows the Pareto Principle. That is, rougly 80% of the front office interns & graduates in London come from the 6 target UK universities (it's give or take 5% across different banks).

    So in an analyst class of 40, it's more likely to be 25-32 from the 6 target unis, and 1 or 2 maximum from some of the other unis you have mentioned. That's quite a signifcant difference. Being at a target university myself, you will find that at target unis it's normal for quite average students to get into banking, but at "lesser" universities it's only a handful of exceptional students who do. So there is a considerable bias.

    Ben also highlights the importance of your university - namely the career facilities and the opportunity to network - with bankers, and other students who will also be in the industry one day. Do not underestimate the value this has. There are only a handful of universities that present the best employment opportunities, and foster a culture that is geared towards getting their students into the "highest" professional careers, eg. investment banking. LSE is one of those universities, Manchester is not.

    OP, is this at all helps in your decision - last year, across 8 of the top 10 banks, there were 487 first year spring interns. 70 of those were from LSE (14.4%), second only to Oxford & Cambridge. Whilst only 5 (1.02%) came from Manchester. The odds seem stacked highly in favour of LSE.
    My post didnt allude to choosing Manchester over LSE. What you are ignoring is the cost factor for the OP. I am guessing you are a home student so a choice between LSE and Manchester is pretty easy.

    If is he being offered a full scholarship to Manchester, he probably is an exceptional student. Regardless of what the numbers look like, I am confident that its fair to say that 80% of those at LSE aspire to be bankers/traders/quants w/e while only a small number at Manchester will have their eyes on banking.

    Just to give you a quick stat from experience, in 2010, a BB had 5 interns from 15-30 ranked universities, out of which, 4 were given an offer. The number of FT offers for LSE students was...2 (out of 8 interns). Point being your university goes only so far.
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    (Original post by Paul Allen)
    My post didnt allude to choosing Manchester over LSE. What you are ignoring is the cost factor for the OP. I am guessing you are a home student so a choice between LSE and Manchester is pretty easy.

    If is he being offered a full scholarship to Manchester, he probably is an exceptional student. Regardless of what the numbers look like, I am confident that its fair to say that 80% of those at LSE aspire to be bankers/traders/quants w/e while only a small number at Manchester will have their eyes on banking.

    Just to give you a quick stat from experience, in 2010, a BB had 5 interns from 15-30 ranked universities, out of which, 4 were given an offer. The number of FT offers for LSE students was...2 (out of 8 interns). Point being your university goes only so far.
    you post quite forcefully like you know more than everyone here. And if ur suggesting the costs are miniscule at 25k for even a home student, good one. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Zweihander)
    OP, is this at all helps in your decision - last year, across 8 of the top 10 banks, there were 487 first year spring interns. 70 of those were from LSE (14.4%), second only to Oxford & Cambridge. Whilst only 5 (1.02%) came from Manchester. The odds seem stacked highly in favour of LSE.
    Just curious, but what % were from Warwick?
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    (Original post by f1mad)
    Just curious, but what % were from Warwick?
    Very high as well, think just a step from LSE as I remember the figures of Warwick were even better than UCL's for SWs in 2011.
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    (Original post by TomasK)
    Very high as well, think just a step from LSE as I remember the figures of Warwick were even better than UCL's for SWs in 2011.
    Cool .
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    (Original post by Jakeh)
    you post quite forcefully like you know more than everyone here. And if ur suggesting the costs are miniscule at 25k for even a home student, good one. :rolleyes:
    LOL please save me the bs. Its a huge LOL how the ib/c forum keeps going down the crapper. If I have said anything contrary to what is true, call me out on it. Not because I am direct.

    They're not minuscule but international students are not getting loans close to 0%. Neither are they getting a maintenance loan and/or a grant. You are also ignoring that this isnt about 25k vs 45k. Its between paying nothing or paying £45k out of your own pocket. Great one!
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    (Original post by Scotgold)
    Hi All,

    I have an offer to study BSc. Maths and Econ at LSE. As an international student my tuition fee will approx be £15,000 p.a over 3 years (so 45k in total). But the issue is Uni of Manchester has offered me 100% scholarship for the same course. (Its a merit scholarship only offered to 2 students a year, I have 5As at A-Levels + some strong ECs).

    I am really keen on a pursuing a career in IB, so I dont know how much of a hurdle would choosing Manchester over LSE be ?? My family can manage to pay for LSE (with a bit of a stretch), but they are really proud of the scholarship and would love me to go for it.. but they have left the ultimate decision to me and I do not want to put too much pressure on them.

    So what do you guys suggest ?? If I work hard at Manchester and highlight my award + strong academics, will it give me good shot at IBs ? Or is LSE really a wortwhile investment ?
    I would have thought that being able to say "I got a full scholarship to go to Manchester" would outweigh any relative benefit which going to LSE would confer. Could be wrong.
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    fun to see how everyone thinks that getting into lse implies earning so much after you graduate that "45k will be a matter of 2 years to flip"

    investment banking does not work this way and neither does life.

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