Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey there Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Pay for Room Electricy By Meter?

Announcements Posted on
Got a question about Student Finance? Ask the experts this week on TSR! 14-09-2014
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Prudy)
    They usually have an obligation to inform their landlord, and to return the energy provider to the original supplier on vacation therefore advisable to speak to the landlord -not to mention changing from PAYG (visa versa) usually involves changing the meter which means you would have to restore the meter to PAYG on vacation, unless you had consent from the landlord
    You do not need consent or to inform the the landlord to do this, if they tried to stop you it would be illegal anyway.

    The landlord could ask you to restore it on leaving as you say, but would struggle to put a legal case together if you didn't due to what is involved here, and it is hardly difficult to do so if they really wanted you to do so.
    This is not the same as doing work on the house where you would need permission, they cannot interfere with this kind of thing and should not expect you to inform them of your private business.

    You can if you want to, but it is not needed.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mabrookes)
    You do not need consent or to inform the the landlord to do this, if they tried to stop you it would be illegal anyway.

    The landlord could ask you to restore it on leaving as you say, but would struggle to put a legal case together if you didn't due to what is involved here, and it is hardly difficult to do so if they really wanted you to do so.
    This is not the same as doing work on the house where you would need permission, they cannot interfere with this kind of thing and should not expect you to inform them of your private business.

    You can if you want to, but it is not needed.
    Just for clarity, could you reference the law you allude to?
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Prudy)
    Just for clarity, could you reference the law you allude to?
    It is more of a lack of law allowing them really, and a landlord who attempts to enforce something they have no rights to do would be breaking the law in the same way if I tried to force you to do something.

    If they attempted to put it as a clause in the agreement it would be unenforceable as it is not a right the landlord has, and so again the above would be true (something that is unenforceable is meaningless).
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mabrookes)
    It is more of a lack of law allowing them really, and a landlord who attempts to enforce something they have no rights to do would be breaking the law in the same way if I tried to force you to do something.

    If they attempted to put it as a clause in the agreement it would be unenforceable as it is not a right the landlord has, and so again the above would be true (something that is unenforceable is meaningless).
    Why would it be unenforceable? Why could the landlord not argue it was a term of the contract?
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    The payg meter would have been installed under the landlord's name or possibly a managing agent. The meter cannot be changed without their permission. The supplier would not do it unless they made an admin error. And it will be within the terms of contract (tenancy) ie no alterations to structure or appliances without consent.

    I could change from payg to dd meter as it was specifically in the contract that the tenant is responsible for the meter whilst the landlord is responsible for the supply.

    Hope this helps you two clarify
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Prudy)
    Why would it be unenforceable? Why could the landlord not argue it was a term of the contract?
    You can't put what you want in a tenancy agreement.

    What basis could the landlord argue it is allowed if you think it could be? If you have an all inclusive agreement then that would be different.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by los lobos marinos)
    The payg meter would have been installed under the landlord's name or possibly a managing agent. The meter cannot be changed without their permission. The supplier would not do it unless they made an admin error. And it will be within the terms of contract (tenancy) ie no alterations to structure or appliances without consent.

    I could change from payg to dd meter as it was specifically in the contract that the tenant is responsible for the meter whilst the landlord is responsible for the supply.

    Hope this helps you two clarify
    The meter is property of the electricity company and will be under the name of whoever pays the bills. Landlords can no more stop their removal than they can stop the electric company fitting one where there is not one to start with to recoup debt from a tenant who has arrears (happens to landlords all the time and they can't stop it as you can find easily).

    You might think they could stop you, but they would be screwed legally as they will be admitting to interfering with the new legal rights given to people to freely change suppliers (and a new supplier can remove the old meter without permission even if you owned the house, so I am not sure how you think a landlord can stop it), and also admitting to causing you to have to pay more for bills.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mabrookes)
    The meter is property of the electricity company and will be under the name of whoever pays the bills.
    Since you are talking about payg in each rented room then that is not correct. When the landlord converts a property in to a house of multiple occupation (HMO) and installs payg meters through the supplier into each room the meters will be supplied under the landlord's name. He/she will receive an annual statement under his/her name for each meter supplied. The landlord is responsible for the meter.

    ______________________

    (Original post by mabrookes)
    Landlords can no more stop their removal than they can stop the electric company fitting one where there is not one to start with to recoup debt from a tenant who has arrears (happens to landlords all the time and they can't stop it as you can find easily).
    This is a separate issue. In this instance the landlord has a DD meter installed for use of the tenant. The tenant is now responsible for the meter. The DD and account will be in the name of the tenant. In this scenario most tenancy agreement in part two of an agreement includes
    2.4 To arrange immediately with the relevant supply company for all accounts for water, gas, electricity, telephone, and television licence (where applicable) at the Property to be addressed to the Tenant in their own name and to pay all charges for these.
    If the tenant subsequently changes to payg then that is their choice in this situation. It is polite but unnecessary to inform the landlord unless the structure of the building is to be changed. The payg meter would be under the name of the tenant and the tenant is responsible for this meter. The tenant would not have to put the dd meter back when vacating the property unless this had been part of any agreement between landlord and tenant.

    Source: Tenancy Agreement Service
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by los lobos marinos)
    Since you are talking about payg in each rented room then that is not correct. When the landlord converts a property in to a house of multiple occupation (HMO) and installs payg meters through the supplier into each room the meters will be supplied under the landlord's name. He/she will receive an annual statement under his/her name for each meter supplied. The landlord is responsible for the meter.

    ______________________

    This is a separate issue. In this instance the landlord has a DD meter installed for use of the tenant. The tenant is now responsible for the meter. The DD and account will be in the name of the tenant. In this scenario most tenancy agreement in part two of an agreement includesIf the tenant subsequently changes to payg then that is their choice in this situation. It is polite but unnecessary to inform the landlord unless the structure of the building is to be changed. The payg meter would be under the name of the tenant and the tenant is responsible for this meter. The tenant would not have to put the dd meter back when vacating the property unless this had been part of any agreement between landlord and tenant.

    Source: Tenancy Agreement Service
    Everything I said was actually based on the idea that it was just a meter installed from the company as normal (with the tenant paying the bill), I forgot about it being seperate rooms .
    We don't know what kind of agreement they have, it probably will be this but could be rented as a house like a lot of student houses are.

    I would like to see the actual arrangement as having meters in each room is a very strange setup for a student house - but you are pretty much right if that is how it is set up and if it is set up that way then I did mention that if the landlord is paying etc it would be different to what I said.
    • 5 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    You'll get charged £50 for replacing a 'smart card' payg meter with a credit meter. It'd be years till you saved that much on the difference in tarrif unless you run a lot of electric heating off it.
    Find out where the hot water's coming from too cos that's another potential electricity gobbler.
    • Thread Starter
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Water is included in the rent. It's only electricity to my room I'll be paying for (excluding lights).
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    You've been given a lot of shoddy advice here sadly. While many posters may not have heard for them, it's not totally unheard of for an area of the house to have a separate meter you need to top up yourself. It's most likely to come up if you live in an annex and your LL wants to know exactly what electricity you're using so you pay your fair share.

    Thing is, this meter is likely NOT administered by the electricity company, your LL will probably be named on the main bill that will cover all electricity usage for the house and will recover the money for this from your sub meters.

    The important things to check with this sort of meter arrangement are:
    That it is only linked up to electricity used in your room. Houses can be wired up in all sorts of ways, you need to turn everything off and check the meter doesn't still increase, if it does, you're paying for more than your own usage.

    Secondly, the LL is responsible for setting the rate on the meter, however, they're only entitled to set the rate at the same rate they are charged by the elec company. This can be harder to work out because likely the meter will only charge at one rate while the electricity bill may have a standing charge and different units charged at different rates, the rate charged by your submeter is required to match (as closely as possible) the rate charged to the LL. You can ask them for a bill or something with their tariff on to verify this if your bills end up being huge.

    As to how much your bills will be, it completely depends on what you're using! Are you sitting in all day with your huge plasma tv on? If you're sensible about what you're using, considering that it isn't going to include lights, cooker, electric shower, washing machine etc. I can't see your bill being worse than about £5 a week depending on what you do actually do in your room. My bill for my whole flat is under £10 a week in the summer and that includes all the things I mentioned.

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: March 18, 2012
New on TSR

Writing your personal statement

Our free PS builder tool makes it easy

Article updates
Reputation gems:
You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.