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People in poorer parts of Britain to be paid less

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    (Original post by Left Hand Drive)
    How much do MP's earn? This should be the first wage to be cut!
    Around £60k.

    Quite low.
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    (Original post by Iron Lady)
    Oh come off it.

    Stop listening to the lies your parents feed you.

    They're hardly disgusting. Socialists on the other hand...
    Didn't know Baroness Thatcher was on TSR...
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    (Original post by LookIt'sPete)
    A house is much cheaper up north than down south...
    There's a reason for that. The houses in the south are usually of better quality and in much nicer area. So someone living in a grim part of Salford could be working hard to earn more money so they can move to a nicer house in a nicer area with better services but now they won't be able to.

    This just makes it harder for people who are trying to get out of poverty. A job isn't like benefits. It shouldn't be based on how much you need but how hard you work to earn it.
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    Anyone that doesn't understand the subtext of the article is frankly an idiot.

    The root of this is ignorance and immaturity - and total lack of awareness of real life.

    A "poorer" part of the country is.....Gainsborough, although it is more or less a self-contained town. In Gainsborough, house prices have maybe tripled over the last 15 years to a whopping £25,000 for a small flat or cottage.

    Anywhere within 10 miles of the M25, no matter how rich or poor you are, it is very unlikely that you will find a property for less than four times that amount - £100,000.

    London weighting does not come close to addressing that - yet National pay bands and scales mean that a public sector worker (say a teacher or nurse) in Gainsborough is paid relatively much more than the exact same role in London. The largest single cost in the South is always housing - in the Gainsborough example, bizarrely it might not be. A person's car could easily cost more than their house.
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    (Original post by Iron Lady)
    Around £60k.

    Quite low.
    More the people being effected by this. 60K is not low...
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    Much more up my street, haha.
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    (Original post by LookIt'sPete)
    A house is much cheaper up north than down south...
    First of all, some houses are cheaper up North, not all houses. Secondly, a house is the biggest purchase you'll probably make in your life, I'm talking about the smaller ones, for instance food, holidays cars etc. All of which are I believe the same price up North as down South, this leads to people doing identical jobs, for the same country having different standards of living. imo this can't be good.
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    (Original post by Iron Lady)
    Around £60k.

    Quite low.
    How is 60k low? :confused:
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    (Original post by scriggy)
    These plan's won't give more pay to anyone, they'll just give some people much less. It essentially translates as pay cuts for everyone outside the South East of England.

    Withdrawing significant amounts of pay from significant amounts of people in areas with already fragile economies is a recipe for disaster IMO.
    True, but it's hardly a secret that the government needs to save money. They couldn't justify making a nationwide pay cut because that could put some people living in expensive areas into poverty. But people in the same jobs in cheaper areas are relatively well off and maybe they can afford a pay cut.

    Although I'd have thought that no one will actually get a pay cut, it's just that their pay won't increase at the same rate it would have done before.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    True, but it's hardly a secret that the government needs to save money. They couldn't justify making a nationwide pay cut because that could put some people living in expensive areas into poverty. But people in the same jobs in cheaper areas are relatively well off and maybe they can afford a pay cut.

    Although I'd have thought that no one will actually get a pay cut, it's just that their pay won't increase at the same rate it would have done before.
    Well they're talking about freezing wages until they fall in line with the private sector, so with inflation that translates into a pay cut.

    But yeh, don't get me wrong I can see the logic behind it, it's just the timing and the motivation behind it that sits uneasily with me. I'm pretty skeptical as this certainly isn't the first time this government has made decisions that disproportionally effect the poor and widen regional divisions.
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    (Original post by laura130490)
    How is 60k low? :confused:
    When you consider the weight of an MP's responsibilities, it's lower than you would expect.
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    I think an issue with this is that it's going to discourage people from moving to poorer areas as they will essentially be 'trapped' and struggle to move to a richer area later, limiting overall economic mobility.

    I want to become a teacher after university, probably with Teach First. How on earth are they going to get people to apply for the Northern regions if those will mean they get paid less? Why would I stay in Leicester, if a 20 mile move to Nottingham would see me several thousand pounds more?

    This idea completely fails to take into account population mobility: it's as if Osborne actually wants to see an even bigger and more insurmountable rich-poor (more like poor-middle class) divide than there already is.
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    (Original post by najinaji)
    When you consider the weight of an MP's responsibilities, it's lower than you would expect.
    They are still within the top 5 or so percent of the country no?
    How much would you pay them?
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    (Original post by Left Hand Drive)
    I remember before the general election TSR was chalk full of tories. Nowadays there is a bit less of them. I hope they see now the disgusting party they voted for
    oh please grow up.
    there is nothing wrong with the tories, those rabid socialist tyrants, on the other hand i can only assume you worship.
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    (Original post by Clip)
    Anyone that doesn't understand the subtext of the article is frankly an idiot.

    The root of this is ignorance and immaturity - and total lack of awareness of real life.

    A "poorer" part of the country is.....Gainsborough, although it is more or less a self-contained town. In Gainsborough, house prices have maybe tripled over the last 15 years to a whopping £25,000 for a small flat or cottage.

    Anywhere within 10 miles of the M25, no matter how rich or poor you are, it is very unlikely that you will find a property for less than four times that amount - £100,000.

    London weighting does not come close to addressing that - yet National pay bands and scales mean that a public sector worker (say a teacher or nurse) in Gainsborough is paid relatively much more than the exact same role in London. The largest single cost in the South is always housing - in the Gainsborough example, bizarrely it might not be. A person's car could easily cost more than their house.
    This is a very good point. I think its an area of economic research that is growing in popularity.

    If London public sector wages were less competitive compared to outside options, it isn't beyond reason to hypothesise that the relative quality of worker will be lower in London (and other high wage areas) if public sector wages are on a fixed national scale. The actual analysis is more complex than that, but its an interesting idea nonetheless.
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    (Original post by najinaji)
    When you consider the weight of an MP's responsibilities, it's lower than you would expect.
    Well... no not really. MPs who get paid that amount generally don't have an awful lot of say in terms of what actually happens. So the extent of their responsibility isn't that vast.

    The ones who do actually have some real responsibility. (The Prime Minister, and the other cabinet minsters etc.) are paid significantly more. So for a job where you don't have much say in what actually goes on, and therefore don't have that much responsibility I'd say it's pretty damn good salary, and a fair bit more than what they deserve for the job they do.
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    (Original post by Cheese_Monster)
    As sceptical as I am about the Coalition, always take the Daily Mail as a source with a pinch of salt. Just look at the comments on their website, such fickel readership.
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/20...al-changes-pay
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    (Original post by Left Hand Drive)
    More the people being effected by this. 60K is not low...
    (Original post by laura130490)
    How is 60k low? :confused:
    £60k is an average income (depending on where you live).

    As najinaji said, an MP has a lot of responsibilities. Giving them a pay cut would make them even more inefficient.
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    (Original post by cl_steele)
    oh please grow up.
    there is nothing wrong with the tories, those rabid socialist tyrants i can only assume you worship.
    Tell me to grow up then do exactly what I did..
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    (Original post by Iron Lady)
    £60k is an average income (depending on where you live).

    As najinaji said, an MP has a lot of responsibilities. Giving them a pay cut would make them even more inefficient.
    Where in the country is £60k an average income? The average income is something like £25k. Yes that have responsibilities and that is reflected in their salary of £60k which is a heck of a lot of money.

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