Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey there Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Anybody that has ever been to Glastonbury Festival

This thread is sponsored by:
Announcements Posted on
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I need some help with a math project I'm currently working on. No I did not made a mistake and posted this thread on the wrong forum.

    The project consists on the amount of people going to the festival, how many tents there are, tent sizes and camping area. Since I haven't had the privilege to go to Glastonbury, yet, I wonder if anybody with the experience of it (or of any other festival of the same type) to answer a couple of questions which would be of a lot of help.

    I know there are different camping areas, and most people bring their tents. Does the whole area destined for camping, fills up to its capacity, or is there a big space to walk and sit to watch the concerts? What are the average tent sizes people bring (by that I mean of people capacity, e.g. 2 person, 5 person)?
    For example if there is a tent with the capacity for 5 people, do 5 people sleep inside or only 2 or 3 so they can be more comfortable?

    Thanks in advance.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    There are designated campsites, which take up most of the site (mostly around the North and South of the main stage area), with areas taped off for paths and in front of stage areas. Although the campsites are given names, it's more for orientation since there aren't really any boundaries between campsites other than a few hedgerows. There is no arena for the stages, so the stages are scattered throughout the site with no barriers between stage and campsites. Generally on the first day there is tape around the stage area and lots of signs so that no one camps where they shouldn't, and then these are taken down once the music starts and there are enough tents so it's pretty obvious where the lines are.

    Most people bring a 3 or 4 person tent. Some bring 6 or 8 people tents, a few crazy people have 1 or 2 person tents. Some people take big tents to store loads of stuff inside and camp luxuriously, some because they have a large group camping together. Mix of everything really, there's no trend that everyone follows and no rules on how full a tent has to be. I'd assume most people take a tent with 1 or 2 persons more than required though (especially since tent capacity never considers space for bags). I have seen a lot of couples with MASSIVE tents though.
    • 6 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ADBwriter)
    I need some help with a math project I'm currently working on. No I did not made a mistake and posted this thread on the wrong forum.

    The project consists on the amount of people going to the festival, how many tents there are, tent sizes and camping area. Since I haven't had the privilege to go to Glastonbury, yet, I wonder if anybody with the experience of it (or of any other festival of the same type) to answer a couple of questions which would be of a lot of help.

    I know there are different camping areas, and most people bring their tents. Does the whole area destined for camping, fills up to its capacity, or is there a big space to walk and sit to watch the concerts? What are the average tent sizes people bring (by that I mean of people capacity, e.g. 2 person, 5 person)?
    For example if there is a tent with the capacity for 5 people, do 5 people sleep inside or only 2 or 3 so they can be more comfortable?

    Thanks in advance.
    Glastonbury is different to other festivals such as Leeds because with Glastonbury you remain on site the entire time whereas with Leeds there is a separate area for camping, as in you have to leave the music site by a specific time each night.

    You're not allowed to camp directly in front of any stages at Glastonbury or just anywhere you want, there are dedicated camping areas such as for stewards, families and then just regular campers. A lot of tents that are used are pop ups as they are easiest to put up and take down quickly and these are usually two-man tents. However, other people take really large tents too, ones that sleep 6-7 people. I would say that most of the tents are at full capacity if not having more people in them than designed. I would also say that the camping areas are pretty full to capacity, although there may be more space further away from the hub if you are willing to walk but it is fairly cramped with an even distribution.

    Hope this helps
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DemolitionLovers)
    Glastonbury is different to other festivals such as Leeds because with Glastonbury you remain on site the entire time whereas with Leeds there is a separate area for camping, as in you have to leave the music site by a specific time each night.

    You're not allowed to camp directly in front of any stages at Glastonbury or just anywhere you want, there are dedicated camping areas such as for stewards, families and then just regular campers. A lot of tents that are used are pop ups as they are easiest to put up and take down quickly and these are usually two-man tents. However, other people take really large tents too, ones that sleep 6-7 people. I would say that most of the tents are at full capacity if not having more people in them than designed. I would also say that the camping areas are pretty full to capacity, although there may be more space further away from the hub if you are willing to walk but it is fairly cramped with an even distribution.

    Hope this helps
    Thank you very much. One last question. What more or less would you say is the space between tents?

    With that I think I will be able to make a good project once I get all the numbers. The only problem is that I have to work with the information from '05, when there were more attendants than tickets sold. Why do you think this happened? (150000 attendants and only 112500 tickets)
    • 6 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ADBwriter)
    Thank you very much. One last question. What more or less would you say is the space between tents?

    With that I think I will be able to make a good project once I get all the numbers. The only problem is that I have to work with the information from '05, when there were more attendants than tickets sold. Why do you think this happened? (150000 attendants and only 112500 tickets)
    It really depends, nearer paths and stuff the tents are practically on top of each other whereas if you walk a little bit further out the tents are say half a metre to a metre apart.

    Well security used to be pretty lax, it was possible to climb over fences and stuff to sneak your way in without paying Although I'm not sure that accounts for such a large number of attendants without tickets!
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ADBwriter)
    With that I think I will be able to make a good project once I get all the numbers. The only problem is that I have to work with the information from '05, when there were more attendants than tickets sold. Why do you think this happened? (150000 attendants and only 112500 tickets)
    The last year with significantly more attendants was 2000 - 200,000 when 100,000 tickets were sold. After that they built the super wall which holds most people out.

    There's always people wanting to get in - when there's a will there's a way. There's a number of tried and tested methods - getting so many people to jump over at once that security can't stop them all, bribing someone who works at a festival to take their bags in and then hopping the fence while security turn a blind eye, slipping your wristband off and giving it to a friend (you now have to show your ticket with your photo on as well as your wristband if you leave and re-enter the festival grounds). Most years there's even someone who tries to parachute in, but security can see them coming a mile off and prepare. In the last few years the rules have become much stricter to try and reduce the number of fencehoppers.
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Thank you so much for your help!
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Don't use Glastonbury, it has an extremely diffuse arrangement with tensts almost everywhere. Whereas Reading s confined by the railway on one side and the river on the other, giving clean defined camping areas, which will be much easier to work with.

    The industry standard, The purple guide, suggests allowing 23.25 metres squared for each tent, which is around 5mx5m. Cheap tents mean that more and more people are camping by themselved, but within +/- 5% either way most festivals are arranged by number of people / 2.5 (average of 2.5 per tent) x 23.25 metres, giving you an amount of space required roughly.
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pwn4g3_P13)
    Don't use Glastonbury, it has an extremely diffuse arrangement with tensts almost everywhere. Whereas Reading s confined by the railway on one side and the river on the other, giving clean defined camping areas, which will be much easier to work with.

    The industry standard, The purple guide, suggests allowing 23.25 metres squared for each tent, which is around 5mx5m. Cheap tents mean that more and more people are camping by themselved, but within +/- 5% either way most festivals are arranged by number of people / 2.5 (average of 2.5 per tent) x 23.25 metres, giving you an amount of space required roughly.
    Thanks, but unfortunately the assigment specificly tells you to work with Glastonbury and gives you the date of 2005, so I'm working with a map from that time.
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Svenjamin)
    The last year with significantly more attendants was 2000 - 200,000 when 100,000 tickets were sold. After that they built the super wall which holds most people out.

    There's always people wanting to get in - when there's a will there's a way. There's a number of tried and tested methods - getting so many people to jump over at once that security can't stop them all, bribing someone who works at a festival to take their bags in and then hopping the fence while security turn a blind eye, slipping your wristband off and giving it to a friend (you now have to show your ticket with your photo on as well as your wristband if you leave and re-enter the festival grounds). Most years there's even someone who tries to parachute in, but security can see them coming a mile off and prepare. In the last few years the rules have become much stricter to try and reduce the number of fencehoppers.
    Another question... are there any recreational tents or activities that take place inside the camping areas?
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ADBwriter)
    Another question... are there any recreational tents or activities that take place inside the camping areas?
    There are recreational tents in the arts & crafts area to the south east. Lots of different activities and classes, everything from wooden spoon painting to learning how to knit to full on stone-sculpting tutorials and crafting with greenwood. The simpler things are free (like knitting and spoons), but most of it you need to pay for. The prices are pretty reasonable though (I think it's £10-15 for an hour for even the more expensive courses).

    There's also the greenfields for hippy activities. Meditation, herbal medicine, spirit cleansing, fortune reading etc.

    In the Park Area to the south west, there's a jamming tent with various instruments (piano, a few guitars, a piano, drums, tamborine etc.) and songbooks.


    These are their own areas though. Generally the campsite areas are big blocks dedicated to camping, although you do need to walk through campsites from the main stage area to get to a few of the areas (such as park stage and john peel stage). These areas are more like mini arenas scattered around the campsite area, rather than activities in the campsites themselves. For example, if the Park Stage is busy, security can close off the Park area so no more people can enter it. It's difficult to describe in words, but pretty obvious if you look at it on the site map.

    Attached Thumbnails
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	map2008.jpg 
Views:	10 
Size:	301.2 KB 
ID:	138693  
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Thanks, that explains a lot.

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: March 29, 2012
New on TSR

So how did you do?

Come into the GCSE forum to share your grades

Article updates
Useful resources

Quick link:

Unanswered festivals and live events threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups
Reputation gems:
You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.