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How valuable is a History degree?

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    (Original post by victoryshinesonus)
    Serious?
    Yes, History is an incredibly valuable degree.
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    (Original post by Agenda Suicide)
    .
    He wasn't attacking humanities, he was making an argument in favour of studying them for their own sake.
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    As long as you don't want to go into something really mathsy or sciencey then history won't hold you back at all.

    It will give you loads of transferrable skills as will any other top humanities degree like philosophy or english lit which employers will love.
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    (Original post by dean01234)
    History is much less valuable than economics, but still a semi-traditional subject so not a complete waste of time like degrees such as music or knitting.

    But at 9,000 a year I don't think I would study history on its own, maybe as a join honours or something...
    you are an idiot
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    (Original post by non)
    How would you compare actuary to accountancy? For pay and hours?
    But isn't the Maths tht you are doing is really complicated and I don't know how you are surviving. Did you do Maths at a level?
    I'm afraid I don't know a lot about accountancy. I would personally imagine that actuarial is better for both, but it would depend greatly on the company. Also, I am hugely biased because I love my job!

    I am only doing the first three exams right now, so somewhere down the line perhaps I might struggle more. In fact, I expect to! People are very supportive at work though and I have a few tutorials which I find really help. Failing isn't the end of the world because you can retake, and many people fail a few on their way. I have found it tough, but I really do think that if I had practised better time management early on it wouldn't have been so bad. I did do maths A level though (you can't really become an actuary without it), and I was freaking good at the subject throughout school.

    The everyday job does not involve a huge amount of maths, at least not in pensions which is my area. I think insurance is more technical, not least because many pensions actuaries are consultants (like me!).
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    Jelkin, I find your posts quite insightful. I've tried for an actuary role and looked at the exams and some of the maths in it are 2nd and 3rd year uni level questions. However you say you do more the consultancy side of things in your role. Perhaps that may be why I wasn't successful in my application, because I didn't express more my people skills.

    Best of luck in your exams btw!
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    HUGE!! I thought the same thing when I was asked to do Advanced History. But what I found out is that a language is required and it's as big as economics. There's archaeology, earth science, teaching (huge money/oppurtunity there), special ops, great for writing books...I might be able to go on but I hope that's satisfactory.
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    (Original post by Jelkin)
    Also, I am hugely biased because I love my job!
    Just out of interest, could you be more specific about what exactly you love about your job?
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    At least as valuable as any other degree independent of more context/elaboration.
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    I'm a history student so clearly biased!

    But I want to say that whether you study history or economics you will still acquire transferable skills in whatever employemnet you choose to take. History degrees are no picnic- they require a very large amount of reading and writing. I go to a touniveristy which has been named 2nd in country for history, but I think in most places its the same- so let me tell you I have to read at minimun- 4 articles per seminar (5-6 seminars a week- articles between 20-50 pages) pluss a large amount of written work- (in my second year and done 15 essays at around average 2,500 mark) which all require 10-12 items of reading (whole books mostly) per essay. History at degree level is very differnet to A level. It's a transference to a huge focus on historiography from the 'what happened' at A level- then to working first hand with primary sources which is something you recieve training to do. The misconceptions about history degrees come from people who don't study history and think they know what a history degree entails.
    Some transferable skills of history degrees are;
    The ability to time manage and meet deadlines
    ability to synthesise a large amount of data into a succeint logical argument
    excellent reading and writing skills
    excellent debate/argument skills

    Although the focus is on history it still incoperates awareness of interdisciplinary approaches, cos history is rarely just history anymore- ie politics, sociology, anthropology, psychology and historical varieties of economics.

    So to summerise- choose a degree that you will enjoy for 3 years- its an intence period of study and if you hate it you will be very unhappy and are unlikely to do well. History is not vocational but it has lost of transferable skills whcih are well respected by employers.
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    (Original post by Epica)
    If they studied Economics and learned some basic theory, then maybe this country wouldn't be in such a financial mess.
    The best economists did not predict the mess we are in nor will they ever get us out of it
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    (Original post by crocker710)
    He who controls the past controls the future.

    History isn't about knowledge of the past; it's about how you apply it to the future. Look at the current cabinet; how many of them studied History or subjects linked (politics/philosophy)?
    Yes, and also notice how many earned their degree, whatever it may be, at Oxbridge. I see no logic behind your claim that studying history is what got them into power; I'm seeing a far more common factor here.
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    (Original post by Agenda Suicide)
    History opens doors.

    People seem to assume the study of the past is only relevant to the past.

    The skills you gain are invaluable for lots of jobs and it develops your argumentative, analytical and overall skills that become useful in every day life.

    Many history graduates go on to work in law, politics, the civil service, estate agents, museums, teachings and a surprising amount also go into working with money. (I still have no idea why this is, ps Gordon Brown, George Osborne. Guess what they studied).


    So yeah, don't listen to all that piffle. History is a great traditional subject, very employable, very useful and at the same time very fun if you like it.
    This. Many high-flying civil servants have been hoovered up upon completing history degrees. If you want to you could always take extra modules in economics if you wanted, as most uni's offer this.

    <3 x
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    (Original post by Kerny)
    The best economists did not predict the mess we are in nor will they ever get us out of it
    It isn't about predicting, but trying to control the situation.
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    (Original post by see-are)
    you are an idiot
    care to elaborate?

    I will elaborate on my point.

    men's incomes are boosted 43% by an economics degree, but women's are boosted 63%.

    And the rate of return on buying a degree in history is 8.8%, reasonable (like I mentioned in my original post) however under the average rate of return for any degree which is 12.1%.

    Not to mention the fact that mnay CEO's, investors, Economists, market research analysts will have a degree in Economics.

    While someone who works as a historian, archivist, secondary school teacher is more likely to have a degree in history.
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    (Original post by Cochrane)
    Troll?

    Seriously, disregard this piffle.

    Would you please explain this?

    Why is anything that I said in my post wrong?

    And why do you call my post piffle when all you have for evidence is your opinion.
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    (Original post by dean01234)
    care to elaborate?

    I will elaborate on my point.

    men's incomes are boosted 43% by an economics degree, but women's are boosted 63%.

    And the rate of return on buying a degree in history is 8.8%, reasonable (like I mentioned in my original post) however under the average rate of return for any degree which is 12.1%.

    Not to mention the fact that mnay CEO's, investors, Economists, market research analysts will have a degree in Economics.

    While someone who works as a historian, archivist, secondary school teacher is more likely to have a degree in history.
    You chat out of your arse, honestly. This is a 2012 article.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-edu...ties-graduates
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    (Original post by dean01234)
    History is much less valuable than economics, but still a semi-traditional subject so not a complete waste of time like degrees such as music or knitting.

    But at 9,000 a year I don't think I would study history on its own, maybe as a join honours or something...
    History is a semi-traditional subject?!:confused::rolleyes: My personal opinion is that if you are only doing undergraduate, an economics degree is far more beneficial, as my link said that employers prefer specialised employee's(e.g. Masters+). However you said history is your passion, and if really is what you love the most I say go for it, you'll regret it later in life if you don't.

    TC: Are you sure you don't want to do a PG? Maybe you'll change you mind when you come to the end of your degree. I would take a look at this linke:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2010...degree-careers
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    (Original post by dean01234)
    care to elaborate?

    I will elaborate on my point.

    men's incomes are boosted 43% by an economics degree, but women's are boosted 63%.

    And the rate of return on buying a degree in history is 8.8%, reasonable (like I mentioned in my original post) however under the average rate of return for any degree which is 12.1%.

    Not to mention the fact that mnay CEO's, investors, Economists, market research analysts will have a degree in Economics.

    While someone who works as a historian, archivist, secondary school teacher is more likely to have a degree in history.
    where are your stats from?
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    (Original post by victoryshinesonus)
    You chat out of your arse, honestly. This is a 2012 article.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-edu...ties-graduates
    Economics is technically a humanity.

    so saying that

    "60% of UK leaders have humanities, social science or arts degrees" doesn't dismiss my point...

    a quote from your article.

    Get your facts straight and don't just read the headline.

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Updated: May 10, 2012
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