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A Question About Oxford

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    I would like to have a major in mathematics (possibly economics) and a minor in languages. I know I've asked before if that's possible at Oxford University,but each time I asked I recieved different answers. How does it work?
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    Oxford doesn't offer any Major-Minor degrees and they don't offer any degree programmes which combine Maths and Languages or Economics.
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    You can do a degree in mathematics, economics & management, OR languages. You can't do major/minors, or take modules in other departments. However, if you want to learn a language you can take extracurricular classes at the language centre regardless of degree.
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    Thanks!! I'm glad that's settled! What about working on two degrees at once? Is that a possibility?
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    (Original post by Dreamer1257)
    Thanks!! I'm glad that's settled! What about working on two degrees at once? Is that a possibility?
    No not at all!

    At any UK University and certainly not at Oxford! The work level would be too great. And there would be issues like lectures and seminars clashing and exams as well. Universities wouldn't let you study for two degrees side by side at the same institution and you can't study at two institutions at the same time.

    However, if you're interested in doing Languages a lot of Universities offer opportunities to take courses in Languages alongside other degrees and even take them for course credits. York do that, as does Exeter and Oxford offers language courses for their students but they have to be paid for separately.
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    That didn't even cross my mind about clashing schedules! How long does it take to finish a degree usually? In the states it's about 5 years for a master's degree.
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    (Original post by Dreamer1257)
    That didn't even cross my mind about clashing schedules! How long does it take to finish a degree usually? In the states it's about 5 years for a master's degree.
    3 years for a BA/BSc with honours in England/Wales
    4 years for a MA/Msc with honours in Scotland which is the equivelant to the BA/BSc level in England and Wales
    The MA qualification is also automatically awarded at Oxbrdge a year after graduating at the bachelor level.

    The MA's above are not however graduate level masters, merely a convention.

    sometimes English universities add in an extra study year abroad or out on work placement to specific degrees making them 4 years in total.

    then graduate studies take 1-6 years depending. ie. one year for a taught MA/MFA/MSc/MRes followed by research or professional doctorate of 3 years or so.

    other professional qualification study after taking the first degree might be needed in some subjects such as architecture or teaching or law.

    Oxford undergaduate degrees are three years long with three terms in each year of eight weeks or so per term.

    Oxford offer some joint study degree programmes but not in the subjects you mention. There is PPE for instance - Politics, Philosophy and Economics.
    Other universities also offer joint study programmes or even FCH (Combined honours) programmes which allow the taking of up to three subjects in a more USA style where the subjects are allowed to be weighted differently according to preference ie 20/30/50 split or 30/35/35 or 70/30 etc Traditionally though a degree is concentrated on a single subject.
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    (Original post by catoswyn)
    3 years for a BA/BSc with honours in England/Wales
    4 years for a MA/Msc with honours in Scotland which is the equivelant to the BA/BSc level in England and Wales
    The MA qualification is also automatically awarded at Oxbrdge a year after graduating at the bachelor level.

    The MA's above are not however graduate level masters, merely a convention.

    sometimes English universities add in an extra study year abroad or out on work placement to specific degrees making them 4 years in total.

    then graduate studies take 1-6 years depending. ie. one year for a taught MA/MFA/MSc/MRes followed by research or professional doctorate of 3 years or so.

    other professional qualification study after taking the first degree might be needed in some subjects such as architecture or teaching or law.

    Oxford undergaduate degrees are three years long with three terms in each year of eight weeks or so per term.

    Oxford offer some joint study degree programmes but not in the subjects you mention.
    Other universities also offer joint study programmes or even FCH (Combined honours) programmes which allow the taking of up to three subjects in a more USA style where the subjects are allowed to be weighted differently according to preference ie 20/30/50 split or 30/35/35 or 70/30 etc
    What is a MFA/Msc...? I'm a bit lost...
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    (Original post by Dreamer1257)
    What is a MFA/Msc...? I'm a bit lost...
    After attaining the undergraduate bachelor degree which is usually awarded as a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science (BA/BSc) according to the nature of the subject you have taken it is then possible to take graduate level studies.

    The next level after the Bachelor degree is called Masters. It usually lasts for a year. Again this level is awarded depending on the nature of the subject so Master of Arts, Master of Science (MSc) etc. MFA is Master of Fine Arts and includes performance based study, MBA would be Master of Business Arts, MRes is Master of Research and can be taken in most subjects whether they are arts or science based. MPhil is a Master of Philosophy which is often taken by people in preparation for study at the next level again which is Doctor of Philosophy (DPhil or PhD). The term philosophy does not mean the literal study of philosophy unless this IS your subject. It is merely a convention to indicate a research masters or doctorate in any subject.

    Many people choose MPhil or MRes if they want to advance to the next level which involves producing original research but you can carry on with further study if you have chosen one of the other master's courses too. The Master's degree can be either based on a taught course or on a research path.

    The final level is the Doctorate and upon completing it you can be called Dr... whatever your name is.... It takes at least three years. Thats the end unless you get to be a Professor somewhere in the course of an academic career or want to do further professional training of some kind.

    You can exit of course at any point along the way ie after your bachelor level is very common or after the masters degree. There is no requirement to take your graduate studies at the same place you took your undergraduate degree. So for instance some people do their first degree at say Durham and their graduate degrees at Oxford or in the USA for instance.

    Phew... there are actually lots of pathways and awards after obtaining the first degree so this isn't comprehensive, just the most common things people do.

    Precis:

    3 years for bachelor degree
    1 year for masters degree
    3 years plus for doctorate

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    (Original post by catoswyn)
    The MA qualification is also automatically awarded at Oxbrdge a year after graduating at the bachelor level.
    :nope:

    The MA is awarded 21 terms after matriculation. So four years after a 3 year course or 3 years after a 4 year course :yes:
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    Lol okay I think I got this. Thanks so much!! I'd probably have chosen all the wrong choices lol!
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    :nope:

    The MA is awarded 21 terms after matriculation. So four years after a 3 year course or 3 years after a 4 year course :yes:
    Sorry. My bad! Thanks for that.

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    (Original post by catoswyn)
    Sorry. My bad! Thanks for that.

    That's alright. Wish it were the way you'd said it though. Then I'd have my MA already
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    (Original post by Dreamer1257)
    Lol okay I think I got this. Thanks so much!! I'd probably have chosen all the wrong choices lol!
    I suppose the first thing to do is to try to find 5 universities with undergraduate courses you like. One of the five is allowed to be Oxford or Cambridge. You don't have to pick five... that's just the maximum allowed. If you have Oxford or Cambridge in your choices then you have to apply earlier than otherwise (usually by Oct 12th or so the year before you wish to enter university) So check your dates and so forth. UCAS process the applications for all universities in the UK so check their site for full details of what is involved in preparing your application. Its all actually easier than it sounds!

    Good luck

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    (Original post by catoswyn)
    I suppose the first thing to do is to try to find 5 universities with undergraduate courses you like. One of the five is allowed to be Oxford or Cambridge. You don't have to pick five... that's just the maximum allowed. If you have Oxford or Cambridge in your choices then you have to apply earlier than otherwise (usually by Oct 12th or so the year before you wish to enter university) So check your dates and so forth. UCAS process the applications for all universities in the UK so check their site for full details.

    Good luck

    October 15th :yes:
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    (Original post by Dreamer1257)
    I would like to have a major in mathematics (possibly economics) and a minor in languages. I know I've asked before if that's possible at Oxford University,but each time I asked I recieved different answers. How does it work?
    To add more confusion to the system, Oxbridge do things differently to others.

    Firstly at the undergraduate level, it's not possible to apply to both Oxford and Cambridge (unless you intend to read Music). Not sure why that's the case.

    An MA (Oxon / Cantab) is not a masters degree. It's awarded to someone who graduated from Oxford or Cambridge with an undergraduate degree and upon payment of a small sum (and waiting a few terms) automatically get "upgraded" to MA. It's sounds unfair and even the director of admissions at Cambridge, Geoff Parks, has said he personally thinks it's meaningless and should be eliminated.

    As for a PhD, the ones at Oxford (and York I think) are called DPhil. There are other degree programmes, such as EngD, which is a doctorate in engineering.
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    (Original post by smileatyourself)
    To add more confusion to the system, Oxbridge do things differently to others.

    Firstly at the undergraduate level, it's not possible to apply to both Oxford and Cambridge (unless you intend to read Music). Not sure why that's the case.
    Can't apply for Music at both.

    The only cases when you can apply to Ox and Camb are if you've already got a degree or I think there's some instance with organ scholarships when you can, but I'm not entirely sure on that one.

    Unless the organ stuff (I think it was organ...) comes in when applying for Music... Someone must know the answer on here!
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    (Original post by Poppyxx)
    Can't apply for Music at both.

    The only cases when you can apply to Ox and Camb are if you've already got a degree or I think there's some instance with organ scholarships when you can, but I'm not entirely sure on that one.

    Unless the organ stuff (I think it was organ...) comes in when applying for Music... Someone must know the answer on here!
    You can apply to both if you are applying as an organ scholar. Some Oxbridge colleges will specify that the organ scholar must be a Music student.

    Aside from that, there's nothing to say that you can apply to both Oxford and Cambridge if you wish to read Music :nah:
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    You can apply to both if you are applying as an organ scholar. Some Oxbridge colleges will specify that the organ scholar must be a Music student.

    Aside from that, there's nothing to say that you can apply to both Oxford and Cambridge if you wish to read Music :nah:
    Thought this was the case. just wasn't sure if there were more conditions to it.

    and I thought you'd know the answer!
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    (Original post by Poppyxx)
    Thought this was the case. just wasn't sure if there were more conditions to it.

    and I thought you'd know the answer!


    I think I'm the most active muso on here :yep:

    I have got a life though. Promise :ninja:

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