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How to prove to an interviewer you will be commited to spend a long time in a job?

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    I was employed in my first full time job for a year before the post was made redundant and found employment pretty much straightaway and have been in the new job for around 3 months. I don't like the new job and would like to leave but will this look like I'm not committed/a job hopper?
    How would you explain in an interview without the interviewer thinking 'I'm not going to employ this person if they are going to leave after 3 months!'.

    I want to be committed to a job and grow with a company but this role hasn't been what I expected - how to explain this in an interview/applications though?
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    You need to be honest, because eventually it will catch up with you. Perhaps say the firm didn't match your ambitions and you wanted to go into a more challenging environment, as that's when you feel you're working best, when you're under pressure. Obviously if this was a large MNC you will struggle to explain why you left, as pretty much all large firms have a similar culture, all looking to make big bucks.
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    become a good lier.
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    (Original post by Future_Dr)
    become a good lier.
    What reason would you give?! It's very difficult to give a justifiable reason for leaving a job after 3 months, especially if it's a grad job or something serious, well it must be a serious job if OP is asking for advice otherwise he wouldn't bother putting it on his CV.

    They will probably check your reason out when they phone for a reference...no point in lying, it'll just catch up with you...unless your going for very low skilled work, which in that case, referees are never checked.
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    (Original post by victoryshinesonus)
    What reason would you give?! It's very difficult to give a justifiable reason for leaving a job after 3 months, especially if it's a grad job or something serious, well it must be a serious job if OP is asking for advice otherwise he wouldn't bother putting it on his CV.

    They will probably check your reason out when they phone for a reference...no point in lying, it'll just catch up with you...unless your going for very low skilled work, which in that case, referees are never checked.
    What?
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    (Original post by Future_Dr)
    What?
    Ha, future doctor...you'd be lucky to be a bin man with that sort of response. Good luck becoming a doctor though, I'm sure you're personality will shine through during interviews.
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    (Original post by victoryshinesonus)
    What reason would you give?! It's very difficult to give a justifiable reason for leaving a job after 3 months, especially if it's a grad job or something serious, well it must be a serious job if OP is asking for advice otherwise he wouldn't bother putting it on his CV.

    They will probably check your reason out when they phone for a reference...no point in lying, it'll just catch up with you...unless your going for very low skilled work, which in that case, referees are never checked.
    I take it that it's too soon to call it 'career progression' :confused:
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    (Original post by barnsleyjames)
    I was employed in my first full time job for a year before the post was made redundant and found employment pretty much straightaway and have been in the new job for around 3 months. I don't like the new job and would like to leave but will this look like I'm not committed/a job hopper?
    How would you explain in an interview without the interviewer thinking 'I'm not going to employ this person if they are going to leave after 3 months!'.

    I want to be committed to a job and grow with a company but this role hasn't been what I expected - how to explain this in an interview/applications though?
    I've conducted a fair number of interviews, a lot of them for trainee/apprentice positions where I definitely didn't want people moving on quickly.

    There's not a lot you can say expressly. Most people with half a brain (or less) say the same old things anyway - how committed they are, how they want to do quality work and so on.

    The "tells" are usually an aside, or not part of the main question "are you in this for the long haul?"

    Someone likely to move on quickly can often give an indication based on something like very strong outside interests, a very chequered work history (including positions like the one interviewing for) and qualifications. If someone has a degree in Biochemistry, it's difficult to accept that they will take an apprentice position as a Sky TV installer, and won't move on if something more congruent to their degree comes along. Similarly, if you are interviewing a girl (and it's usually girls) for an admin position in your sector and they talk at length about charity and do-gooding, you can be pretty sure that as soon as some cool HIV/homelessness charity in Farringdon offers her (even on less money) her feet won't touch the ground on the way out.

    I interviewed someone once for trade apprenticeship, and his CV was covered with football coaching qualifications (as hobbies) and he seemed to spend all his spare time doing it. In his interview he talked about how he loved coaching football in his spare time. We offered him the role, and he accepted but he didn't show up for his first day - I heard he took a job working at a football 5-a-side centre instead.

    Another thing to be wary of is over-ambition. It's very easy to come across as "I want to learn everything I can in a short space of time, so that I can leave here and set up on my own or go to one of your rivals" For employers - this is worse than just leaving - this is leaving and becoming competition.
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    (Original post by Clip)
    I've conducted a fair number of interviews, a lot of them for trainee/apprentice positions where I definitely didn't want people moving on quickly.

    There's not a lot you can say expressly. Most people with half a brain (or less) say the same old things anyway - how committed they are, how they want to do quality work and so on.

    The "tells" are usually an aside, or not part of the main question "are you in this for the long haul?"

    Someone likely to move on quickly can often give an indication based on something like very strong outside interests, a very chequered work history (including positions like the one interviewing for) and qualifications. If someone has a degree in Biochemistry, it's difficult to accept that they will take an apprentice position as a Sky TV installer, and won't move on if something more congruent to their degree comes along. Similarly, if you are interviewing a girl (and it's usually girls) for an admin position in your sector and they talk at length about charity and do-gooding, you can be pretty sure that as soon as some cool HIV/homelessness charity in Farringdon offers her (even on less money) her feet won't touch the ground on the way out.

    I interviewed someone once for trade apprenticeship, and his CV was covered with football coaching qualifications (as hobbies) and he seemed to spend all his spare time doing it. In his interview he talked about how he loved coaching football in his spare time. We offered him the role, and he accepted but he didn't show up for his first day - I heard he took a job working at a football 5-a-side centre instead.

    Another thing to be wary of is over-ambition. It's very easy to come across as "I want to learn everything I can in a short space of time, so that I can leave here and set up on my own or go to one of your rivals" For employers - this is worse than just leaving - this is leaving and becoming competition.
    Applicants actually say this at an interview?! How stupid! Sorry, but surely that's rule number one, don't let the employer know you're just there to use them as a stepping stone for experience/get qualifications. I.e if applying to the big 4 for auditing and ACCA, don't say to them you're leaving once you're qualified in 3 years...
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    (Original post by barnsleyjames)
    I was employed in my first full time job for a year before the post was made redundant and found employment pretty much straightaway and have been in the new job for around 3 months. I don't like the new job and would like to leave but will this look like I'm not committed/a job hopper?
    How would you explain in an interview without the interviewer thinking 'I'm not going to employ this person if they are going to leave after 3 months!'.

    I want to be committed to a job and grow with a company but this role hasn't been what I expected - how to explain this in an interview/applications though?
    You could move towns and explain you had to relocate as you're thinking of getting married or something and your girlfriend wants to settle in the new town (where hopefully the new job is......) Implying personal need to move and you are going to be such a stable person in future. Of course you'd have to have a break up or something... or marry someone but hey ho... you get what I mean.. some people do have to move to places or return to their original homeplace to be near family etc. It does always imply commitment to the new town/job too whereas the old one was just badly located. Also gives a reason to give your current employers... such regret blah blah, loved it here, envisaged myself here for the long haul... unfortunately family cirumstances now dictate... aged parents, my mad sister... so unexpected really... sad, sad... bye.

    Or you try and find a company similar but in some way better or different than your current one... always wanted to work here, something of a dream of mine, just had to apply...

    Sometimes people do just move on quickly. So long as the reason you give to the new employer for feeling the current job isn't right for you is not something that the next employer feels would be no different with them you might be okay anyway. People do understand that these things happen.

    Good luck.

    Better get going on that marriage proposal and those job applications!

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    (Original post by Clip)
    I've conducted a fair number of interviews, a lot of them for trainee/apprentice positions where I definitely didn't want people moving on quickly.

    There's not a lot you can say expressly. Most people with half a brain (or less) say the same old things anyway - how committed they are, how they want to do quality work and so on.

    The "tells" are usually an aside, or not part of the main question "are you in this for the long haul?"

    Someone likely to move on quickly can often give an indication based on something like very strong outside interests, a very chequered work history (including positions like the one interviewing for) and qualifications. If someone has a degree in Biochemistry, it's difficult to accept that they will take an apprentice position as a Sky TV installer, and won't move on if something more congruent to their degree comes along. Similarly, if you are interviewing a girl (and it's usually girls) for an admin position in your sector and they talk at length about charity and do-gooding, you can be pretty sure that as soon as some cool HIV/homelessness charity in Farringdon offers her (even on less money) her feet won't touch the ground on the way out.

    I interviewed someone once for trade apprenticeship, and his CV was covered with football coaching qualifications (as hobbies) and he seemed to spend all his spare time doing it. In his interview he talked about how he loved coaching football in his spare time. We offered him the role, and he accepted but he didn't show up for his first day - I heard he took a job working at a football 5-a-side centre instead.

    Another thing to be wary of is over-ambition. It's very easy to come across as "I want to learn everything I can in a short space of time, so that I can leave here and set up on my own or go to one of your rivals" For employers - this is worse than just leaving - this is leaving and becoming competition.
    That's interesting. I love hearing stories from the interviewer's side!
    There has been a fair few threads started by people who are interested in post school apprenticeships and so forth. Some are preparing to apply and others have been turned down after interview and are a bit worried. I bet they'd love to hear any advice you have for them if you haven't found them already. I never know quite what to say and things are so bad for people at the moment... There's also a lass posting somewhere on here today who got her first paid job in a chip shop and is being let go already poor thing.. I think she could do with some advice about interviews and things to be honest.



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    (Original post by victoryshinesonus)
    Applicants actually say this at an interview?! How stupid! Sorry, but surely that's rule number one, don't let the employer know you're just there to use them as a stepping stone for experience/get qualifications. I.e if applying to the big 4 for auditing and ACCA, don't say to them you're leaving once you're qualified in 3 years...
    Of course they don't say that - but that's how you can come across - it's a short step from enthusiasm.
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    (Original post by victoryshinesonus)
    Ha, future doctor...you'd be lucky to be a bin man with that sort of response. Good luck becoming a doctor though, I'm sure you're personality will shine through during interviews.
    Yes I will be lucky to be a bin man, don't know why you chose this to be an negative, but I rather become a doctor anyway. thanks though

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