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advice on tmobile price change

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    I have £15 contract iPhone 3gs with t-mobile for 24 months, now its been 5months since i signed their contract, today i received letter telling me we'll increase price plan to £21 in may this year.
    what do you think is the best idea to handle this situation.
    Many thanks
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    Write them a letter or email saying that as it is a significant change in the contract to your detriment you are giving them 30 days notice of the cancellation of the contract.
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    You sure it was a 15 pound contract? T-Mobile are increasing their contracts by 3.7% which us within their contracts, but that amount is significantly more.
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    I also got the letter.

    I've just rung up and cancelled the contract - only had a few months to go so it wasn't a massive amount to pay.

    I'm fairly sure the price increase will be in line with their terms and conditions, but I cancelled based on the following principles:

    - Don't hike the price mid contract.
    - If T-Mobile have rising costs, they should have the foresight to deal with it without affecting prices mid-contract. Their failure to do so is down to shoddy management.


    The guy I spoke to tried to tell me that the letter I got was incorrect and that the price would not be increasing as steeply as the letter claimed. So presumably, if I hadn't of rung up, I would be charged the steep letter price.

    The bottom line is that it's a really cheeky thing for T-Mobile to do. I'm not against price increases if it's necessary for business sustainability, but when we make an agreement on £x per month for X number of months, I think it should be honoured.

    T-Mobile lost a long term customer in me today. There were 29 people ahead of me in the queue, so I'm sure I'm not the only one.

    If you are prepared to do it, cancel on principle. They need to realise that this way of increasing prices is not on.
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    Tell them they need to go back to school on the grounds that an approx 4% rise has turned into a 40% one.
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    (Original post by Aack)
    I've just rung up and cancelled the contract - only had a few months to go so it wasn't a massive amount to pay.

    I'm fairly sure the price increase will be in line with their terms and conditions, but I cancelled based on the following principles:

    - Don't hike the price mid contract.
    - If T-Mobile have rising costs, they should have the foresight to deal with it without affecting prices mid-contract. Their failure to do so is down to shoddy management.
    You go, sticking to your principles by paying off the remainder of the contract.:rolleyes:
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    mine is going up only by like 93p, but thats after i pay for my last monthy bill before renewing. My plan is to haggle like a bitch for my next phone

    And if all else fails, i'll move to o2 :wizard:
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    (Original post by James82)
    You go, sticking to your principles by paying off the remainder of the contract.:rolleyes:
    What other choice do I have that doesn't result in a bad credit rating? Not really worth it for 13 quid, is it?
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    (Original post by Aack)
    What other choice do I have that doesn't result in a bad credit rating? Not really worth it for 13 quid, is it?
    Uhm, that's the whole point of a principle. Surely you'd have been better off seeing the contract out till the end, at least then you would have gotten something for your £13.
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    (Original post by James82)
    Uhm, that's the whole point of a principle. Surely you'd have been better off seeing the contract out till the end, at least then you would have gotten something for your £13.
    No - what would the principle in that be?

    I cancelled my contract the day they sent the letter to make a stand against it. Carrying on with my contract wouldn't really be saying anything to them.
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    (Original post by Aack)
    No - what would the principle in that be?

    I cancelled my contract the day they sent the letter to make a stand against it. Carrying on with my contract wouldn't really be saying anything to them.
    Because cancelling the contract and paying it off to the end is making a stand? Making a stand would have been sending them a letter along the lines of my original reply to the OP in post 2.
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    (Original post by James82)
    Because cancelling the contract and paying it off to the end is making a stand? Making a stand would have been sending them a letter along the lines of my original reply to the OP in post 2.
    Which would have achieved diddly squat as it's well within their terms and conditions.
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    (Original post by Aack)
    Which would have achieved diddly squat as it's well within their terms and conditions.
    If it's within their terms and condition then what principle are you upholding? If you're not happy with the terms and conditions don't accept the contract.
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    (Original post by James82)
    If it's within their terms and condition then what principle are you upholding? If you're not happy with the terms and conditions don't accept the contract.
    Because all mobile phone service providers have it within their T's and C's.

    The difference is, the other providers don't hike the price mid contract (to my experience). T Mobile does.
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    I'm with T Mobile and when my contract expires I think I might try a smaller network like Giffgaff.
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    (Original post by Aack)
    Because all mobile phone service providers have it within their T's and C's.

    The difference is, the other providers don't hike the price mid contract (to my experience). T Mobile does.
    Perhaps you should read terms 7.1.4, 7.2.3.2 and 7.2.3.3:

    7.1.4. We can increase any Price Plan Charge. We will give You Written Notice 30 days before We do so. The change will then apply to You once that notice has run out.

    7.2.3. A Cancellation Charge won’t apply if You are within the Minimum Term and:
    7.2.3.1. Our entitlement to operate the Network ends at any time; or
    7.2.3.2. You are a Consumer and the change that We gave You Written Notice of in point 2.11.2 or 7.1.4 above is of material detriment to You and You give Us notice to immediately cancel this Agreement before the change takes effect; or
    7.2.3.3. The change that We gave You Written Notice of in point 7.1.4 is an increase in Your Price Plan Charge (as a percentage) higher than any increase in the Retail Price Index (also calculated as a percentage) for the 12 months before the month in which We send You Written Notice and You give Us notice to immediately cancel this Agreement before the change takes effect.
    So if your charge has increased by more than 3.7% (http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/key-figures/index.html) you can cancel your contract.
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    (Original post by James82)
    Perhaps you should read terms 7.1.4, 7.2.3.2 and 7.2.3.3:



    So if your charge has increased by more than 3.7% (http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/key-figures/index.html) you can cancel your contract.
    The information you posted bears no relevance.

    And you're missing the point entirely.
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    Simply change your part in the contract, as easily as they can, by ending it.
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    (Original post by Aack)
    The information you posted bears no relevance.

    And you're missing the point entirely.
    Why does it bear no relevance? The OP had an increase from £15 to £21, you claimed you also got that letter, so I'm assuming you got a similar increase, therefore you both have the right to cancel your contracts.

    What is the point you are trying to make?
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    (Original post by Snagprophet)
    Simply change your part in the contract, as easily as they can, by ending it.
    Exactly, the OP and Aack are both entitled to end their contracts according to the T&Cs they agreed to. But apparently Aack has made a stand against the mighty corporation by paying off the end of his contract.

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